Jump to content


* - - - -

Audio Cables 101

cord cable wire jack plug connect

Die deutsche Version finden Sie unter der englischen
Vous pouvez trouver la version française dessous l'allemand.

Introduction
This is a primer for using audio cables, how they work, and what the common cable types are. Below are a couple of books that are excellent reference materials that expand on the subject:
Wire, Cable, and Fiber Optics for Video & Audio Engineers by Stephen H. Lampen (Aug 1, 1997) http://www.amazon.co...35303440&sr=1-2
Audio/Video Cable Installer's Pocket Guide (Pocket Reference) by Stephen H. Lampen (Jan 15, 2002) http://www.amazon.co...94&sr=1-2-fkmr1

How an Audio Cable Works
Audio cables work by sending electrical signals from one place to another. This is very similar to the way that electrical current flows from a power outlet in your house. However audio cables use much smaller voltages than a common 110 volt plug.

Electricity 101
In order for electricity to “flow” between two points you need two things: a “hot” or positive wire and a “neutral” or negative wire. This completes a “circuit” and allows the electrical signal from your instrument to your amp, mixing console or computer interface.

All standard audio cables use this basic electrical principle no matter what connector is attached to the end. This is what is happening when you plug your guitar into your amp with a ¼” guitar cable or when you connect your DVD player to your TV with an RCA plug, they both work exactly the same way.

Balanced and Unbalanced Audio Cables
I have noticed online that there seems to be a lot of confusion and long explanations about the difference between balanced and unbalanced audio cables. All most guitarists and recording enthusiasts need to know is the basic electrical difference between the two and what that means for them. I’m going to try to explain the difference in plain English as best I can.


Unbalanced cables work exactly as I just described. In a guitar cable for instance there is positive wire or “tip” which connects to the tip of the connector at the end of the cable. And a neutral “sleeve” that wraps around the wire connected to the tip. The neutral or sleeve serves two purposes: To provide a neutral conductor so that electricity can flow and to shield the positive middle wire from outside interference.


-Low impedance audio, or mic level would be 48-52 Ohms (3-pin XLR connectors, balanced lines).

-Higher (but not high) impedance audio for mixers and other distributive audio equipment instrument level is around 1,000 [between 680 to 1,800] Ohms (1/4" phone connectors, TS-unbalanced and TRS-balance lines).

-High impedance audio Mixers, other circuit applications, distribution amps and other distributive audio line level require 1,000 to 10,000 Ohms (RCA connectors, unbalanced lines).


Q: So my guitar cables and pedals are unbalanced?
A: YES, nearly all guitar equipment is.


Q: Is that bad?
A: Absolutely NOT.


Unbalanced cables can be prone to outside electrical interference over long distances. Basically the longer the cable, the less effective the sleeve is going to be at shielding the cable from outside electrical interference. Fortunately most guitar cables and patch cables are relatively short so this is usually not an issue for most musicians. A good rule of thumb for any unbalanced cable is if it’s over 10ft long and you are using it in a room or on a stage with a lot of other electrical equipment you could hear unwanted hum, buzz, or noise.

Q: What does this mean for me?
A.(1) Nobody likes to be “tied” to their amp but try to keep guitar and other unbalanced cables around 10ft or shorter for the least amount of noise and strongest signal. (15ft is usually ok, 25ft is pushing it.)
A.(2) In recording situations it’s ok to use unbalanced cables in most cases but if you want crystal clear audio try to keep them under 10ft. Also, watch out for unbalanced connections on the back of rack gear. Having an unbalanced connection near that much other gear could cause noise problems.


Balanced Cables
Balanced cables still rely on a “hot” conductor and a “neutral” conductor to carry electrical signals but they add another element to the equation: a ground. A ground is called a ground because well… it literally goes into the ground! Straight through the cable, through your balanced audio gear, through the wall to the fuse box and down a wire or pipe into the Earth. In balanced audio cables the sleeve is used as the ground. The ground or sleeve does NOT carry a signal and is NOT heard in the audio. It’s simply there to protect from unwanted noise while the hot and neutral carry the signal.


Now for the magic: the hot and neutral both carry the same signal, noise and all. Hot is flowing in a positive direction, neutral in a negative direction. Balanced audio equipment simply outputs the voltage difference between the two wires. Since the noise is represented equally on both hot and neutral it is “inverted” and cancelled out. I know this might sound complicated but what it means for you is that you can have hundreds of feet of balanced cable and still have noise free audio.

Q. What types of things use balanced audio cables?
A. Microphones and recording equipment is, or should be, balanced in most cases.


Q. If I use a balanced cable with my guitar can I balance the signal?
A. No. The equipment you are using must have balanced connections as well.


Q. Why are balanced cables so expensive?
A. They are made with a process called “twisted pairing” which is more expensive to manufacture than unbalanced cables.


Q. If I have the choice of using balanced or unbalanced cables which one should I use?
A. In most cases if you are using balanced equipment you should use balanced cables. But if you get into a tight spot and need run something
unbalanced it’s ok as long as the cable length is short and you get no unwanted noise.

How to tell the difference between balanced and unbalanced cables:
  • The technical name for guitar cables is TS which stands for Tip (hot), Sleeve (Neutral).
  • Studio ¼” cables are called TRS which stands for Tip (Hot) Ring (Neutral) Sleeve (Ground)
  • TS Cables have one ring on the connector:
  • TRS Cables have two.
  • Any cable that has three prongs or “legs” like an XLR Cable is usually balanced.
  • Some cables are made for odd routing situations and are three “legged” on one side and two pronged on the other. These are still unbalanced.
Glossary of Cables:

Unbalanced:

TS 1/4":

Attached Image: TS.jpg

This is the standard ¼” cable seen on guitars and unbalanced recording equipment.

TS 1/8” Mini:

Attached Image: CANF11.jpg

A TS or “mono” mini plug is most commonly seen as an adapter.


RCA or Phono:

Attached Image: pRS1C-2160381w345.jpg

RCA connections are seen primarily on entry level recording equipment. They are also found on consumer products like DVD players, turntables, and older television sets.

Banana Plug:

Attached Image: bca10280-ff56-4c3c-b844-a384a2334706_300.jpg

Banana plugs are mostly used for consumer audio speaker connections.


Insert or Y Cable:

Attached Image: CMP153-medium.jpg

An insert cable splits a stereo signal into two mono parts and is referred to as a Y-Cable because it is literally shaped like a Y.


Balanced:

XLR:

Attached Image: XLR1.5-medium.jpg

XLR is the most common connection for microphones and is often referred to as a “mic cable”.

TRS ¼”:

Attached Image: CSS503.jpg
(Notice the two rings around the top of the connector.)

TRS is a balanced ¼” cable that is used in studios and live sound reinforcement to minimize noise over long distances.

TRS 1/8” Mini:

Attached Image: GHGH2025.jpg

The 1/8” “mini plug” connector is often used on headphones and other consumer sources like sound cards.

Tiny Telephone or TT:

Attached Image: TTS-102.jpg

The TT or Tiny Telephone is a balanced connection used for connections in professional patch bays.

Digital Connections:
Most digital connections use the same principles we have already discussed; they just use them in a different way. Digital cables are made to send “pulses” of current or light that can be decoded by a computer. It is VERY important to use the proper cable type with digital connections. Things like “impedance” or the amount of resistance present in the cable play an important role in how this information is sent. Just because a S/PDIF cable looks like an RCA Cable doesn’t mean the RCA cable plugged into your DVD player can handle a S/PDIF connection. You might experience strange errors and digital distortion if you use a cable that is not properly rated.


S/PDIF:

Attached Image: 419100.jpg

S/PDIF or Sony/Phillips Digital Interface is by far the most common digital connection. It uses a 75 ohm unbalanced RCA phono connection. You can use standard RCA cables if they are rated at 75ohms.

Optical or Light Pipe:

Attached Image: OPTICAL CABLE.gif

Optical or Light Pipe is a discrete multichannel digital standard developed for the ADAT. It is most commonly seen on digital audio interfaces and preamps. You may also see optical ports on high end consumer devices as an audio connection. Optical cables use pulses of light to send information. They tend to be expensive and fragile so handle with care.

AES/EBU:

Attached Image: lightning-aes-ebu.jpg

AES/EBU: is basically S/PDIF’s big brother. AES uses the same protocol as S/PDIF but it can handle more information at once. AES/EBU uses a balanced connection with XLR on both sides. When using an XLR make sure it is Type 1 (referring to pin order) and rated at 110 ohms.

BNC or Bayonet:

Attached Image: cable-cabeza-bnc.jpg

BNC is an unbalanced connection that is used primarily in professional video as an alternative to RCA. On the audio side of things it is mainly used to carry word clock information. BNC comes in 50 and 75 Ohm varieties, most audio equipment uses 75 ohm.

Multi-pin Connectors

Multi-pin connectors are usually found on high end audio interfaces and consoles, they are used as a balanced multi channel connection that saves space on the back of a piece of gear. Each pin on the connector is a discrete channel that carries audio or digital information from one point to another.

Most guitarists and home recording enthusiasts won’t run into these connections too often because they are mainly used in recording or live sound equipment that is very expensive.

D-Sub/DB25:

Attached Image: 800px-X21-15pin-D-Sub-connector-0a.jpg

D-Sub is a family of connectors used on computer devices and comes in multiple pin configurations. The most common D-Sub connection is the one found on the back of VGA computer monitors. It is not uncommon for companies to use D-Sub to carry audio on high end peripherals because the connectors are common and relatively inexpensive.

Elco/Edac:

Attached Image: 305275.jpg

Elco and Edac (which in many cases are interchangeable) are large multi pin connectors that can have as many 120 pins. They can be heavy and have an actuating screw that holds the male and female connectors in place.

TDIF:

Attached Image: TDIF-5m-big.jpg

A proprietary type of 25 pin D-Sub that was created by Tascam. It is found on a wide variety of professional recording equipment as an alternative to the ADAT standard.


Audio Kabel für Beginner

Einführung:
Dies ist ein Leitfaden zur Nutzung von Audio Kabeln, wie diese funktionieren und welche die gebräuchlichsten Arten sind. Hierunter finden Sie zwei Bücher, die das Thema Audio Kabel exzellent behandeln: (Achtung, Englisch)
Wire, Cable, and Fiber Optics for Video & Audio Engineers von Stephen H. Lampen (1 Aug, 1997) http://www.amazon.co...35303440&sr=1-2
Audio/Video Cable Installer's Pocket Guide (Pocket Reference) von Stephen H. Lampen (15 Jan, 2002) http://www.amazon.co...94&sr=1-2-fkmr1

Die Funktionsweise eines Audiokabels:
Audiokabel versenden ein elektrisches Signal von einem Punkt zum anderen. Dies ist dem normalen Stromfluss wie aus der Steckdose Zuhause sehr ähnlich. Audiokabel benutzen jedoch sehr viel kleinere Spannungen als die Normale 230 Volt Steckdosen-Spannung.

Elektrizität:
Damit Elektrizität zwischen zwei Punkten fließen kann, braucht es zwei Dinge, einmal eine positive Leitung und eine neutrale Leitung. Wenn man beide hat kann nun ein elektrischer Kreis entstehen, der ein Signal vom Instrument an Ihren Verstärker, Ihren Mixer oder den Computer weiterleitet.
Alle standart Audiokabel benutzen dieses Grundprinzip der Elektrik egal welcher Anschluss an das Ende angeschlossen ist. Dies geschieht, wenn Sie z.B. Ihre Gitarre an Ihren Verstärker mit einem 6.35mm Kabel anschließen oder wenn Sie Ihren DVD Player anhand eines RCA Steckers mit Ihrem Fernseher verbinden. Beide funktionieren genau auf diese Weise.

Symmetrische und asymmetrische Audiokabel:
Im Netz entstehen oft Verwirrung und ewige Erklärungen was das Thema symmetrisch und asymmetrisch angeht. Alles was Gitaristen und Aufnahme-Enthusiasten kennen müssen ist der grundlegende Unterschied zwischen beiden und was das bedeutet.

Asymmetrische Kabel funktionieren genu so, wie bisher beschrieben. Im Gittarenkabel (6.35mm – ¼") gibt es somit die positive Leitung, die Spitze und die neutrale Leitung, den Schaft, der sich um die Leitung legt, die an die Spitze angeschlossen ist. Das Neutrale dient hier zwei verschiedenen Zwecken: Erstens dient es als neutrale Leitung um einen Stromfluss erst möglich zu machen und zweitens schützt es die positive, mittlere Leitung vor außenliegenden Interferenzen.
  • Audio niedriger Impedanz: Der Mikrofon-Pegel liegt zwischen 48 und 52 Ω (3 Pin XLR Stecker und symmetrische Verbindungen)
  • Audio höherer Impedanz (aber nicht hoch), für Mixer und andere verteilende Audiogeräte. Der Instrument-Pegel ist hier ca. 1000 Ω (genauer: zwischen 680 und 1800 Ω).
(6.35mm Telefonstecker, TS ("tip"= Spitze "sleeve"= Schaft) asymmetrisch und TRS ("tip"= Spitze "ring"= Ring "sleeve"= Schaft) symmetrisch)
  • Audio hoher Impedanz für Mixer, Schaltkreise, verteilende Verstärker oder andere verteilende Audiogeräte. Line-Pegel benötigt 1000 bis 10000 Ω.
Also sind meine Gitarren Kabel und Pedale asymmetrisch?
Ja, fast jedes Gitarren Equipment ist asymetrisch.

Ist das schlecht?
Nein...

Asymmetrische Kabel sind anfällig für Interferenzen von Außen über lange Distanzen. Im Grunde, desdo länger das Kabel, desdo weniger effektiv ist der Schaft im Schützen des Kabels vor elektrischen Interferenzen. Zum Glück sind die meisten Gitarren- und Patchkabel relativ kurz, was bedeutet, dass es hier meist kein Problem gibt. Als Faustregel gilt: Das asymmetrische Kabel sollte nicht länger sein als 3 Meter sein, wenn Sie es in einem Raum oder auf der Bühne benutzten mit viel elektrischem Material in der Nähe. Wenn es länger ist kann es sein, dass Unerwünschtes wie Brummen, Rauschen und Krach auftaucht.

Was bedeutet das für mich?
  • Niemand will an seinen Verstärker gebunden sein, trotzdem sollten Sie versuchen das asymetrische Kabel unter 3 Metern Länge zu halten um möglichst wenig Krach zu erhalten und ein starkes Signal zu haben. (4,5m ist meist noch ok und 7.5m ist grenzwertig)
  • In Aufnahmesituationen ist es meist in Ordnung asymetrische Kabel zu benutzen, wenn Sie aber kristallklaren Ton haben wollen versuchen Sie die Länge der Kabel unter 3 Metern zu halten. Außerdem sollten Sie auf asymetrische Verbindungen auf der Rückseite des Racks achten. Wenn ein asymmetrisches Kabel in der Nähe von so viel Material ist kann ein Rauschen entstehen.
Symmetrische Kabel:
Symmetrische Kabel benutzen immer noch den positiven und negativen Leiter um das elektrische Signal zu tragen aber hier wird ein drittes Element hinzugefügt: Die Masse. Die Masse geht durch das Kabel, in Ihr symmetrisches Gerät, durch die Wand, den Sicherungskasten und in den Boden. Bei symmetrischen Kabeln dient der Schaft als Masse. Die Masse trägt KEIN Signal und kann nicht im Ton gehört werden. Die Masse dient einzig und allein der Abschirmung vor ungewollten Geräuschen während positiv und neutral das Signal transportieren.

Welche Geräte benutzen symmetrische Audiokabel?
Mikrofone und Aufnahmegerät sind, oder sollten, in den meisten Fällen symmetrisch sein.

Wenn ich ein symmetrisches Kabel mit meiner Gitarre benutzen, kann ich das Signal symmetrisch machen?
Nein, das Gerät muss auch immer symmetrisch sein.

Warum sind symmetrische Kabel so teuer?
Symmetrische Kabel werden mit einem speziellen Verfahren hergestellt, das "Twisted Pairing" oder auch "Aderverdrillung".Dieses Verfahren ist teurer als die normale Herstellung wie bei asymmetrischen Kabeln.

Wenn ich die Wahl habe symmetrische oder asymmetrische Kabel zu benutzen, welche benutze ich dann?
In den meisten Fällen sollten Sie bei symmetrischen Geräten auch symmetrische Kabel benutzen. Wenn Sie aber mal unbedingt ein asymmetrisches Kabel benutzen müssen, ist das in Ordnung sofern es nicht zu lang ist und Sie kein unerwünschtes Krachen bekommen.

Wie kann ich ein symmetrisches von einem asymmetrischen Kabel unterscheiden?
  • Der technische Name für Gitarrenkabel ist TS, was für Tip (= Spitze), das Positive und Sleeve (= Schaft), das Neutrale steht.
  • 6.35mm (1/4") Studio Kabel werden TRS gennant, für Tip (= Spitze), das Positive; Ring, das Neutrale und Sleeve (= Schaft), die Masse.
  • TS Kabel haben einen Ring auf dem Stecker.
  • TRS Kabel haben zwei Ringe.
  • Kabel, die drei Zinken oder Beine haben, wie ein XLR Kabel, sind meist symmetrisch.
  • Manche Kabel werden für sehr spezielle Routing Situationen hergestellt und haben drei Beine an einem Stecker und zwei am anderen. Diese sind immer noch asymmetrisch.
Glossar der Kabel:

Asymmetrisch:
TS 6.35mm (1/4"):

Attached Image: TS.jpg

Dies ist ein standart 6.35mm Kabel wie bei Gitarren und anderen asymmetrischen Aufnahmegeräten.

TS 3.5mm (1/8") Mini:

Attached Image: CANF11.jpg

Solch ein TS oder Mono Mini Stecker wird meist als Adapter benutzt.

RCA oder Phono:

Attached Image: pRS1C-2160381w345.jpg

RCA Anschmüsse werden meist bei Einsteiger Aufnahmegeräten verbaut. Außerdem kann man diese auf Verbrauchergeräten finden wie DVD Playern, Turntables oder alten Fernsehgeräten.

Bananenstecker:

Attached Image: bca10280-ff56-4c3c-b844-a384a2334706_300.jpg

Banenenanschlüsse werden meist bei Lautsprechern für den Endkonsumenten verbaut.

Y-, Insertkabel:

Attached Image: CMP153-medium.jpg

Ein Insertkabel teilt ein Stereo Signal in zwei Mono Signale und werden Y-Kabel genannt, da es diese Form hat.

Symmetrisch:

XLR:

Attached Image: XLR1.5-medium.jpg

XLR Kabel werden meist für Mikrofone benutzt und werden so auch oft Mikrofonkabel genannt.

TRS 6.3mm (1/4"):

Attached Image: CSS503.jpg

Das TRS ist ein symmetrisches Kabel, welches in Studios und bei Liveauftritten verwendet wird um Krachen und Rauschen über lange Distanzen zu minimieren.

TRS 3.5mm Mini:

Attached Image: GHGH2025.jpg

Der 3.5mm "Mini" Stecker wird meist bei Kopfhörern oder anderen Konsumentenprodukten verwendet, wie z.B. Soundkarten.

Tiny Telephone oder TT:

Attached Image: TTS-102.jpg

Der TT Stecker wird als symmetrische Kabel für professionelle Patch-Panel verwendet.

Digitale Anschlüsse:

Die meisten digitalen Anschlüsse verwenden die gleichen Prinzipien wie die, die wir bereits behandelt haben, verwenden diese aber auf eine andere Art. Digitale Kabel senden Strom- oder Lichtimpulse, die von einem Computer entschlüsselt werden können. Bei digitalen Anschlüssen ist es sehr wichtig das korrekte Kabel zu verwenden. Impedanz oder Resistenz spielen bei diesen Kabeln eine große Rolle bei der Datenübertragung. Nur weil ein S/PDIF Kabel wie ein RCA Kabel aussieht, bedeutet das nicht, dass das RCA Kabel, welches man in einen DVD Player einsteckt auch eine P/PDIF Verbindung handhaben kann.

S/PDIF:

Attached Image: 419100.jpg

S/PDIF oder Sony/Phillips Digital Interface ist bei Weitem der gebräuchlichste Anschluss. Es benutzt einen 75 Ω, asymmetrischen RCA Stecker.

ADAT Lightpipe:

Attached Image: OPTICAL CABLE.gif

ADAT Lightpipe ist ein Audio Protokoll, welches als digitaler multikanal Standart für ADAT entwickelt wurde. Am häufigsten findet man diesen Anschluss bei digitalen Audioschnittstellen und Vorverstärkern. Diese Lichtleitanschlüsse kann man manchmal auch auf hochwertigen Verbraucher-Geräten als Audioanschluss finden. Lichtwellenkabel benutzen Lichtimpulse um Informationen zu versenden. Oftmals sind diese Kabel eher teuer und zerbrechlich und müssen daher mit Sorgfalt behandelt werden.

AES/EBU:

Attached Image: lightning-aes-ebu.jpg

AES/EBU ist eigentlich der große Brider des S/PDIF Anschlusses. AES benutzt das selbe Protokoll wie der S/PDIF Anschluss, kann aber viel mehr Informationen gleichzeitig transportieren. AES/EBU sind symmetrisch und haben auch dementsprechende symmetrische XLR Stecker an beiden Enden. Wenn Sie ein einfaches XLR Kabel benutzen wollen brachen Sie eines des Typen 1 (in Bezug auf die Stiftordnung) bei 110 Ω.

BNC oder Bayonet:

Attached Image: cable-cabeza-bnc.jpg

Das BNC ist ein asymmetrisches Kabel, welches vorwiegend bei professionellen Video Anwendungen als Alternative zu RCA verwendet wird. Was Audio angeht, wird es meist als Träger für Wordclock Informationen verwendet. BNC hat einmal eine 50 Ω und eine 75 Ω Variation, die meisten Audiogeräte verwenden aber die 75 Ω Variante.

Mehrpolige Stecker:

Mehrpolige Stecker, bzw. Multi-Pin Stecker sind meist auf High-End Audio Schnittstellen und Konsolen zu sehen. Sie werden als symmetrische Multikanal-Verbindung benutzt, die Platz auf der Rückseite des Gerätes spart. Jeder Pin ist ein separater Kanal, der ein Audio Signal oder digitale Informationen trägt.

Die meisten Gitaristen und Aufnahmeenthusiasten werden nicht sehr oft auf diese Art Stecker stoßen, da diese meist bei sehr teurem Aufnahme- und Live-Sound-Geräten verwendet werden.

D-Sub/DB25:

Attached Image: 800px-X21-15pin-D-Sub-connector-0a.jpg

Die D-Sub Steckerfamilie wird oft bei Computern benutzt und kommt in verschiedensten Pin-Konfigurationen. Der gebräuchlichste D-Sub ist der VGA Stecker, den man auf der Rückseite vieler Computer Monitore finden kann. Der D-Sub Stecker wird oftmals verwendet, da die Stecker sehr weit verbreitet und relativ billig herzustellen sind.

Elco/Edac:

Attached Image: 305275.jpg

Elco und Edac (die meist untereinander austauschbar sind), sind große Multi-Pin Stecker, die bis zu 120 Pins beinhalten. Sie können sehr schwer werden und haben eine Schraube zum Einrasten, die das männliche und weibliche Ende zusammenhält.

TDIF:

Attached Image: TDIF-5m-big.jpg

Der TDIF Stecker ist eine Art D-Sub, aber mit 25 Pins. Er wurde von Tascam entwickelt. Dieser Anschluss wird oft auf porfessionellen Aufnahmegeräten als Alternative zum ADAT Standart verwendet.


Câbles audio pour les débutants

Introduction:
Ce document explique les différents câbles audio, comment ils fonctionnent et quels sont les câbles les plus populaires. Les livres ci-dessous sont des références excellentes concernant ce sujet: (Anglais)
Wire, Cable, and Fiber Optics for Video & Audio Engineers de Stephen H. Lampen (Aug 1, 1997) http://www.amazon.co...35303440&sr=1-2 Audio/Video Cable Installer's Pocket Guide (Pocket Reference) de Stephen H. Lampen (Jan 15, 2002) http://www.amazon.co...94&sr=1-2-fkmr1
Fonctionnement du câble audio:
Les câbles audio fonctionnent en envoyant des signaux électriques d'un endroit à un autre. Ceci est très similaire à la façon dont le courant électrique dans votre maison circule. Mais les câbles audio utilisent des tensions beaucoup plus faibles que la prise 230 volt générale.

Électricité:
Afin d'électricité de circuler entre deux points, vous avez besoin de deux choses: Un fil positive et un fil neutre. Ceci achève un circuit et permet un signal électrique de votre instrument à votre ampli, table de mixage ou ordinateur.
Tous les câbles audio standard utilisent ce principe de base en électricité n'importe quel connecteur est fixée à l'extrémité. Tous ca arrivent si vous connectez votre guitare à un ampli avec un câble 6.35mm ou si vous connectez un lecteur DVD avec une TV avec une prise RCA. Les deux travaillent de la même façon.

Câbles audio symétriques et asymétriques
Il y en a beaucoup de confusion et explications longues concernant les différences entre les câbles symétrique et asymétrique. La plupart des guitaristes et enthousiastes d'enregistrement doivent seulement savoir que la différence de base électrique et ce que ca veut dire.

Les câbles asymétriques fonctionnent exactement comme décrit ci-dessus. Dans un câble guitare, par exemple, il y en a un fil positif, la "pointe" et un fil neutre, le "manchon". Le neutre sert à deux choses: Fournir un conducteur neutre pour que l'électricité peut circuler et de protéger le fil de milieu positif de toute interférence extérieure.
  • Audio d'impédance basse, ou sur "niveau microphone". De 48 à 52 Ω. (connexion XLR à 3 broches, lignes symétriques)
  • Audio d'impédance plus haute (mais pas haute) pour les tables de mixage ou autres équipement audio de distribution. Le "niveau instrument" est environ 1 000 Ω (entre 680 et 1 800).
Connecteurs jack 6.35mm, lignes TS asymétrique (jack 2 points) et TRS symétrique (jack 3 points).
  • Audio d'impédance haute pour les tables de mixage, amplificateurs de distribution et autre audio distributive. Le niveau de ligne a besoin de 1 000 à 10 000 Ω. (connecteurs RCA, lignes asymétrique)
Donc, mes câbles de guitare et pédale sont asymétriques?
Oui, presque tout le matériel de guitare est asymétrique.

Est-ce que c'est mauvais?
Non.

Les câbles asymétriques peuvent être vulnérables pour les interférences électriques sur longues distances. En général, si le câble est plus long, le manchon sera moins efficace à protéger le câble des interférences électriques externes. Heureusement, la plupart des câbles de guitare et câbles de raccordement sont normalement courtes donc ce n'est généralement pas un problème pour la plupart des musiciens. Règle générale: Si le câble est plus long que 3 mètres, et vous l'utilisez avec beaucoup de matériel électrique dans une chambre ou sur une scène, vous pouvez entendre bruits, bourdonnements ou rumeurs indésirables.

Qu'est-ce que ca veut dire pour moi?
  • Personne n'aime être "lié" à l'ampli mais essayez de na pas utiliser des câbles plus long que 3 mètres pour le signal plus fort et stable. (4,5m est normalement ok mais 7,5m sera habituellement trop de distance.)
  • Dans les situations d'enregistrement, c'est bien d'utiliser des câbles asymétriques dans la plupart des cas mais si vous voulez du son limpide, essayez d'avoir des câbles sous 3m. Faites attentions aux connexions asymétriques en arrière du rack. Si vous avez beaucoup d'autre matériel près d'une connexion asymétrique peut causer des problèmes de bruit.
Câbles symétriques
Les câbles symétriques toujours utilisent un positive et neutre pour générer un signal électrique mais ils ajoutent un troisième élément: la terre électrique. La terre est appelé terre parce que elle va via le câble et votre matériel symétrique dans le mur, la boîte à fusibles dans la terre. Pour les câbles symétriques, le manchon est utilisé comme terre. La terre n'a aucun signal et ne peut pas être entendu dans l'audio. La terre protège seulement des bruits indésirables.

Maintenant, la magique: Le positif et le neutre transportent le même signal, tous le son et les bruits…. Le matériel symétrique uniquement sortie la différence de tension entre les deux. Car le bruit est représenté également sur les deux, il est inversé et annulé. Ca veut dire que vous pouvez avoir centaines de mètres de câble symétrique et toujours avoir du audio sans bruit.

Quel matériel utilise des câbles audio symétriques?
Microphones et matériel d'enregistrement sont, ou devraient être symétriques.

Si j'utilise un câble symétrique avec ma guitare, est-ce que je peux faire le signal symétrique?
Non, le matériel vous utilisez doit être symétrique également.

Pourquoi est-ce que les câbles symétriques sont si chers?
Ces câbles sont produits de façon "paire torsadée", ce procès est plus cher que la production normale du câble asymétrique.

Si j'ai la possibilité d'utiliser des câbles symétriques ou asymétriques, lequel dois-je utiliser?
Dans la plupart des cas, si vous utilisez du matériel symétrique, vous devez utiliser des câbles symétriques. Mais si vous devez une fois utiliser un câble asymétrique, c'est bon à condition que le câble soit court et vous ne recevez pas du bruit indésirable.

Comment est-ce qu'on fait la différence entre les câbles symétriques et asymétriques?
  • Le nom technique des câbles guitare sera TS: "Tip" (pointe: positive) et "Sleeve" (manchon: neutre)
  • Câbles studio 6.35mm seront des câbles TRS: "Tip" (pointe: positive), "Ring" (anneau: neutre) et "Sleeve" (manchon: terre)
  • Les câbles TS ont un anneau sur le connecteur.
  • Les câbles TRS ont deux anneaux.
  • Les câbles avec trois dents, comme un câble XLR sont habituellement symétriques.
  • Certains câbles sont produits pour des situations de routage bizarres. Ils ont trois broches à un connecteur et deux broches sur l'autre. Ces câbles sont asymétriques.
Glossaire des câbles:

Asymétriques:

TS 6.35mm:

Attached Image: TS.jpg

C'est le câble standard pour les guitares et pour le matériel asymétrique d'enregistrement.

TS 3.5mm Mini:

Attached Image: CANF11.jpg

Ce connecteur Mono ou TS est le plus souvent considéré comme un adaptateur.

RCA ou Phono:

Attached Image: pRS1C-2160381w345.jpg

Les connecteurs RCA sont vus principalement sur ​​l'équipement d'enregistrement d'entrée de gamme. Ces connecteurs sont également sur les produits de consommateur, comme le lecteur DVD, les plaques tournantes ou plus vieux télévisions.

Fiche banane:

Attached Image: bca10280-ff56-4c3c-b844-a384a2334706_300.jpg

Les fiches banane sont principalement utilisées pour les connexions des haut-parleurs du consommateur.

Câbles Y, Insert:

Attached Image: CMP153-medium.jpg

Le câble Y divise le signal stéréo dans deux parties mono.

Symétriques:

XLR:

Attached Image: XLR1.5-medium.jpg

Le câble XLR est le câble la plus fréquente pour les microphones et est souvent désigné comme un "câble micro".

Câble TRS 6.35mm:

Attached Image: CSS503.jpg
(Remarquez les deux anneaux autour de la partie supérieure du connecteur.)

TRS est un câble 6.35 symétrique utilisé dans les studios et live pour minimiser les bruits sur longues distances.

TRS 3.5mm Mini:

Attached Image: GHGH2025.jpg

Ce connecteur est souvent utilisé pour les écouteurs et autres appareils du consommateur comme les cartes de son.

Tiny Telephone ou TT:

Attached Image: TTS-102.jpg

Ce câble est une connexion symétrique pour les patchs professionnels.

Connexions digitales:

La plupart de connexions digitales utilisent les mêmes fonctions de base que nous avons déjà discutés; ces connexions seulement les utilisent dans une autre manière. Les câbles digitaux envoient des impulsions de courant ou lumière. Ce signal peut-être décodé de l'ordinateur. C'est très important d'utiliser le câble approprié pour les connexions digitales.

L'impédance ou résistance jouent un rôle très important dans la façon dont cette information est envoyée. Juste parce qu'un câble S/PDIF ressemble à un câble RCA ne veut pas dire que le câble RCA peut traiter une connexion S/PDIF. Vous pourriez rencontrer des erreurs bizarres et de la distorsion numérique si vous utilisez un câble qui n'est pas correctement évalué.

S/PDIF:

Attached Image: 419100.jpg

S/PDIF ou Sony/Phillips Digital Interface est le câble le plus commun pour les connexions digitales. Ce câble utilise une connexion RCA Phono de 75 Ω.

Câbles ADAT Lightpipe:

Attached Image: OPTICAL CABLE.gif

ADAT Lightpipe est une norme digitale développé pour ADAT. Ils sont vu plus communs sur les interfaces audio digitales et sur préamplificateurs. Parfois, vous le pouvez trouver sur des appareils haut de gamme des consommateurs comme connexion audio. Ces câbles utilisent des impulsions de lumière pour envoyer des informations. Ces câbles ont tendance à être cher et fragile, donc: Manipuler avec précaution.

AES/EBU:

Attached Image: lightning-aes-ebu.jpg

Câbles AES/EBU utilisent le même protocole comme le câble S/PDIF mais sais transporter plus d'informations en même temps. AES/EBU a des connecteurs symétriques XLR. Si vous voulez utiliser un câble XLR, veuillez vous assurer que c'est un Type 1 à 110 Ω.

BNC ou Bayonet:

Attached Image: cable-cabeza-bnc.jpg

BNC est une connexion asymétrique utilisée principalement en vidéo professionnel comme alternative pour RCA. Pour audio, ce câble est habituellement utilisé pour transporter des informations Wordclock. BNC est 50 Ω ou 75 Ω mais la plupart du matériel audio utilise la version 75 Ω.

Connecteurs multibroches:

Connecteurs multibroches se trouvent généralement sur les interfaces audio haut de gamme et sur consoles, ils sont utilisés come connexion multicanal symétrique qui économise de l'espace sur le dos d'une pièce d'équipement. Chaque broche est un canal séparé qui transporte des informations audio ou numérique d'un point à un autre.

La plupart des guitaristes et enthousiastes d'enregistrement ne trouvent ces connexions très souvent. Ces connexions sont principalement utilisées dans les équipements d'enregistrement ou de son live qui est très cher.

D-Sub/DB25:

Attached Image: 800px-X21-15pin-D-Sub-connector-0a.jpg

D-Sub est une famille des connecteurs utilisés pour les ordinateurs et est disponible dans multiples configurations des broches. La connexion la plus fréquent est laquelle trouvé sur le dos des moniteurs VGA. Ces connecteurs sont très répandu pour transporter des signaux audio parce qu'ils sont commun est bon marché.

Elco/Edac:

Attached Image: 305275.jpg

Elco et Edac sont des connecteurs multibroches larges qui peuvent avoir jusqu'à 120 broches. Ces connecteurs peuvent être très lourds et ont une vis pour attaché mâle et femelle.

TDIF:

Attached Image: TDIF-5m-big.jpg

Un type de D-Sub 25 broches qui ont été créé par Tascam. Ce connecteur se trouve sur une grande variété de matériel d'enregistrement professionnel en tant qu'alternative à la norme ADAT.


0 Comments