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Loose Model Knob On Brand-new Jtv-59


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#1 xpanmanx

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 09:43 PM

Greetings,

 

If you've seen my other thread, you know I've just brought home my new tobacco-burst JTV-59 from Guitar Center.  It's less than 8 hours old.

 

As I was experimenting with the virtual capo, I found that the model selector knob was loose.  The whole shaft seems to be wiggling around, not just the knob.

 

I opened up the cavity and it seems that this 1/2" square housing on the back of the knob is loose.  The same square part on the back of the alternate tuning knob is rock-solid.

 

I don't want to simply go back to the store and exchange the guitar because 1> they had only one tobacco-burst model in stock, and 2> I was planning on having a lot of fun at this weekend's gigs with my new toy.  GC also doesn't seem to have a tobacco-burst model anywhere except for ship-to-store with a 3-5 day lead time.

 

If Line 6 would send me the replacement part, I'm sure I could install it.  If a replacement is necessary.  It looks like a really easy job.

 

Or maybe GC could send another guitar to a store near me for an exchange.

 

I'm pretty patient with this kind of thing.  As long as everyone's working together.

 

Has anyone else encountered this problem?  If so, how did you solve it?

 

Thanks --


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#2 clay-man

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 01:55 AM

If it is loose, all I can think of suggesting is stuffing a piece of paper between the side of the hole and the part where the knob hangs on to tighten the space between it.


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#3 xpanmanx

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 05:04 AM

Thanks, clay-man ....


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#4 xpanmanx

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 09:48 PM

I called Line 6 today. After about 40 minutes in the phone queue, I spoke with a support rep who was at first skeptical of the idea that a customer could service a day-old JTV-59. After much discussion, he put me on hold for about 10 minutes, and when he came back, he told me that he'd spoken with a repair tech and ....

.... what I needed to do was to remove the encoder cavity cover, then unscrew the two small silver screws on either side of the model encoder bracket. Next, remove the model knob and gently push the encoder shaft to pop the assembly out of the guitar. Invert the encoder assembly and remove the two small black screws which fasten the LED circuit board to the assembly, then remove the LED board itself. Don't disconnect any wires. With the encoder assembly hanging loose, and the LED circuit board detached from the assembly, the shaft nut can be tightened with a 12mm wrench. Add a little LockTite Blue for security. Reassemble and rock on.

This took me about 15 minutes. Done, and happy.
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#5 spmartin

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 11:20 AM

As always, I am astounded by the poor level of quality control for a guitar that costs $1,400. You never hear of this with PRS SEs or even Fender Squiers, and they are much less expensive. Is there anything more disheartening than getting a NEW guitar home and having a problem with it??


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#6 phil_m

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 11:52 AM

As always, I am astounded by the poor level of quality control for a guitar that costs $1,400. You never hear of this with PRS SEs or even Fender Squiers, and they are much less expensive. Is there anything more disheartening than getting a NEW guitar home and having a problem with it??

 

I wouldn't say you never hear about it from those other brands. It's odd you bring up the PRS SEs, because the Variax is actually made in the same factory as those. It's just with added complexity, there's more things that could go wrong. So that means there's more to look for in the way of problems, and it means that there's more that could possibly slip through.

 

It's interesting, I was at a training session/factory tour last week for my work at one of the largest theatrical lighting and controls companies in the world. You've undoubtedly seen their products if you've ever gone to a rock concert or Broadway show. They do most of their manufacturing in the US still, and they actually do a lot of testing on their products before they leave the factory. But even then, they said, "we make electronic equipment, and we know we will have failures sometimes. It just happens." A certain failure rate is simply unavoidable when you're dealing with mass production.


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#7 xpanmanx

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 04:10 AM

Academic discussion of failure rates generally leads to the consensus that a very low percentage is acceptable.  When the discussion becomes practical, it rubs a nerve.

 

You guys probably noticed this in the OP: "I'm pretty patient with this kind of thing.  As long as everyone's working together."

 

For such an easy repair, if Line 6 had insisted that my guitar be taken to a service center, it would be back on the hanger at GC, and I'd be playing a new Taylor 314 and getting by on my trusty Tele.

 

Believe me, I understand the complexity of the instrument and the likelihood that a sufficient care must be taken to avoid cascade failure. 

 

Fortunately for all involved, Line 6 rose to the occasion and directed me through the repair in the comfort of my own living room :)


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#8 toneman2121

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 07:29 AM

Academic discussion of failure rates generally leads to the consensus that a very low percentage is acceptable.  When the discussion becomes practical, it rubs a nerve.

 

You guys probably noticed this in the OP: "I'm pretty patient with this kind of thing.  As long as everyone's working together."

 

For such an easy repair, if Line 6 had insisted that my guitar be taken to a service center, it would be back on the hanger at GC, and I'd be playing a new Taylor 314 and getting by on my trusty Tele.

 

Believe me, I understand the complexity of the instrument and the likelihood that a sufficient care must be taken to avoid cascade failure. 

 

Fortunately for all involved, Line 6 rose to the occasion and directed me through the repair in the comfort of my own living room :)

what is the repair


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I'M SO HAPPY!


#9 Dark-Star

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 11:20 PM

xpanmanx,

 

Good, you fixed it. I remember the inquiry. Sorry he took a while on the phone with you, it took me a few minutes to show him how it's done, so that he could explain it to you. And it only took about 15-minutes, good. Glad it worked out. Way to go.

 

 

-The Tech


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#10 evanteatum

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 09:38 PM

SAME thing just happened to mine- Now cant access the MODELED Guitars / cant Custom save - Brans new JTV59 ! Gig Friday w/ Beatles cover project NEED THIS guitar !
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#11 theoptimizers

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 11:36 AM

I returned a new Black JTV-59P last week because it had a loose selector switch and a flaw on the neck.

Customer service is good, but QC seems lacking.
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#12 evanteatum

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 07:51 AM


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#13 davidb7170

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 05:57 PM

Can you take the model knob off the shaft on the top of the guitar and get at any nut on the front of the unit? Maybe it can be tightened from that side? You probably can't engage your models because the knob hits the surface of the guitar top because it retreats into the body slightly when you press it down. Just a thought. Others -- chime in here.

 

Dave


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