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Line 6 Xd-v75 Drop Outs - Unacceptable


Best Answer dboomer , 24 October 2013 - 10:58 AM

If you choose to run in RF2 mode then you will need to scan and carefully select channels ( just like other wireless systems). If you run in RF1 mode you can probably use any channels without regard to what else is running. I would advise switching to RF1.

Your router is likely interfering with your mics in RF2 mode.. Go to the full post


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#1 crowdr

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 12:11 PM

I have three (3) Line 6 units...two (2) XD-V70 units and one (1) XD-V75 unit for my lead vocalist.  All of the units are housed in a rack with other Sennheiser G300 Wireless systems.  I use a Behringer X32 Digital Mixer that is accessed by an iPad through an ASUS RT-AC66U 802.11AC Gigabit Router.

 

I am experiencing frequent drop outs when using the V75 unit that has rendered it unusable.  I have scanned channels, changed it from low to high power and back, moved the mixer and ASUS unit away from the stage to FOH 40-50 feet away and still it drops out.  The rack holding the units is always less than 20 feet from the stage and the antennas are mounted on the front.

 

Please help!


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#2 dboomer

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 08:15 PM

Which RF mode are you operating in?  Are all systems in the same mode?

 

Are your Sennheiser units IEM transmitters?  You cannot operate wireless mic receivers and IEM transmitters in the same rack even though they are in different bands.

 

Are you running your router at 2.4 or 5GHz?



#3 RonMarton

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 09:00 PM

Just complementing (and complimenting) Don Boomer's "rapid response", crowdr...

 

Without the vital information that Don's requesting, we're only guessing that you're

  1. Possibly operating your two different generations of XD-V gear in the RF frequency schemes they had on original issue, meaning that your older 70s would be running RF1 which will "tread all over" the V75 if it's struggling along in its "out of the box" (but newer) RF2 mode and/or
  2. Your router possibly operating in the (again, older) 2.4GHz band may also be giving you grief.

This document http://line6.com/sup...frequencies-r90 may also help you.


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#4 crowdr

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 07:54 PM

Which RF mode are you operating in?  Are all systems in the same mode?

 

Are your Sennheiser units IEM transmitters?  You cannot operate wireless mic receivers and IEM transmitters in the same rack even though they are in different bands.

 

Are you running your router at 2.4 or 5GHz?

I changed all of my systems to RF2 mode via my XD-V75 system.  The router operates in both 2.4 and 5GHz bands.  If there is a way to disable the 2.4GHz, I guess that I should try that.

 

My Sennheiser units are not IEM's.  They are older EW100 and 300 systems (500MHz bands).  I did not know that you could not have IEM's and wireless mic systems in the same rack, however, mine are in two separate racks anyway and they are Shure 900 systems.


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#5 dboomer

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 10:58 AM   Best Answer

If you choose to run in RF2 mode then you will need to scan and carefully select channels ( just like other wireless systems). If you run in RF1 mode you can probably use any channels without regard to what else is running. I would advise switching to RF1.

Your router is likely interfering with your mics in RF2 mode..

#6 LucianSmith

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 05:36 AM

I have four XD-V75 units and am experiencing RF dropouts with three of them.  They're currently in the default RF2 mode at high power.  They work flawlessly in an empty theatre but as soon as 300+ guests show up, everything goes to crap.  Transmitters are about 60 feet from receivers, worn on the actors' backs.  Other than the actors' bodies, there is line of sight to the receiver.

 

To make sure I understand the difference between RF1 and RF2:

 

Hypothetically I have a 2.4Ghz router and a 2.4Ghz cordless phone.  It is better to use a carefully selected RF2 channel.

 

I don't have any other 2.4Ghz equipment, but the audience members might, and might not turn them off even though we ask them to.  It is better to use RF1.

 

Is this correct?


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#7 dboomer

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 07:11 AM

Yes, unless you are in control of your RF environment you should use RF1.

#8 LucianSmith

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 09:19 AM

Thanks!


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#9 LucianSmith

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 10:33 PM

Just finished a perfect show using RF1.  Thanks again.

 

I wish you'd written the manual for these devices so I could have known this earlier!


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#10 tamezjos1

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 05:54 AM

Which RF mode are you operating in?  Are all systems in the same mode?

 

Are your Sennheiser units IEM transmitters?  You cannot operate wireless mic receivers and IEM transmitters in the same rack even though they are in different bands.

 

Are you running your router at 2.4 or 5GHz?

 

Hello I'm experiencing dropouts in my XD75 too, and I am running one Sennheiser IEM transmitter/receiver. Can you elaborate on the IEM problem please ???


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#11 Sheriton

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 01:47 AM

Putting a transmitter right next to a receiver (even if they're on different bands) can cause problems. I think Desense is the technical term - the wanted signal gets swamped by the unwanted one as it's so much more powerful due to its proximity.

Separate the radio mic receivers from the IEM transmitters (or separate their antennae if they're remote) and all should be well.


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