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Is It Possible To Put Xdv-30 & 35 Recievers In A Rack ?

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#1 Reason413

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 01:33 PM

Hey all,    I was wondering if there would be any issues with securing the XDV 30 and 35 Recievers to a Rack Shelf and keeping them ina rack during use.. Ive seen people do it with Shure PGX units and some of the lower end sennheisers, and with these being 2.4 Wifi, I am thinking I can get away with this...   any ideas?  


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#2 RonMarton

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 04:55 PM

...with these being 2.4 Wifi, I am thinking I can get away with this...   any ideas?  

 

Just one …and I doubt it's what you want to hear... :lol:

 

I'd be VERY reluctant to have any metalwork (at all) around the enclosed receiving antennae that are built in to either or both of these units, both of which are designed to stand on top of existing cabinets, or directly adjacent to a performer, in order to operate (really well) via a clear "line of sight" from their "partner" transmitter/s.

 

There'd be no harm in trying what you have in mind, but success would really surprise me, ...given that the higher the frequencies being used, the less RF systems actually "forgive" in terms of their signals arriving via less direct paths.

 

The Shure PGX and Sennheiser G-series to which you refer both operate in RF bands that can be loosely described as "half GHz", whereas the XD-V systems frequencies run nearly five times higher in the 2.4 GHz ISM band, ...as you know.

 

Now here's where RF propagation "around corners" really is truly and weirdly counter-intuitive…  :wacko:

 

While that higher operating frequency definitely DOES grant many other advantages, (particularly when used for the transmission of digital data) it follows that the length of the radio "waves" employed by XD-V systems' are roughly one-fifth the length of the waves used by the other systems you've mentioned, so they are much less likely to "wrap around" metallic obstacles such as rack hardware.

 

To us, that simply means "more dropouts" are highly likely whenever the XD-V30's and/or XD-V35's inbuilt receiving antennae are enclosed in the manner you're considering. 


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#3 Reason413

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 05:40 PM

Yes, they are normally on the table to the side of the stage or on the table directly in front of the stage along with the mixer... Im just trying to have to spend less time unpacking and packing things up....  I guess I should be happy with the way my rig is right now  lol 

 

my built in effects processor on my Behringer 1832fx went bad... any signal that goes through it on Aux 2 is distorted and " crackly"  so I found that if I use the Aux 2 Send to an outboard effects processor ( Lexicon Alex ) and back through Aux 2 Return, the built in processor gets ignored....  

 

my next addition is going to be outboard 31 band EQ's for my mains ( MAckie Thump TH15s) and use the built in 9 band EQ for he monitors..... 

 

Im getting there LOL 


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#4 RonMarton

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 10:16 PM

...my built in effects processor on my Behringer 1832fx went bad... any signal that goes through it on Aux 2 is distorted and " crackly"  so I found that if I use the Aux 2 Send to an outboard effects processor ( Lexicon Alex ) and back through Aux 2 Return, the built in processor gets ignored...  

 

It's just possible that you may be able to repair your Xenyx 1832's internal fx problem yourself, if you have both the physical space to "lay bits out" and the time to try.

 

My experience has been that one of the more common causes of that type of failure has been internal components such as chips, sub-boards and/or multi-pin connectors not remaining fully "seated" after having received "bumps" on the road.

 

Getting to them generally starts with careful disassembly of the side "cheeks", rear panel and bottom plate, making sure of careful "step by step" photography, documentation and "laying out" of retaining screws, along with all of the associated metalwork and fastenings, …to guarantee the success of subsequent re-assembly.

 

Once "inside", a gentle "squeeze" to re-seat every connector, card and component may reveal one that's come loose.

 

In this case I'd be paying particular attention to those around the Fx unit's own separate "Fx Send" level knob, "DSP Effect" numerical display and its associated bar-graph LEDs.


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