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Uk Plug For Dt25..?


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#1 kye90

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 09:43 AM

Hi, I ordered a DT25 from a German website and it came today.  The problem is that I live in the UK and it doesn't seem to come with a UK plug...  I don't know whether the plug included is EU or USA.

On the two-pronged end, it says 16A 250v.  But on the opposite end, the end that goes into the amplifier, it says 10A 250v.

But on the actual DT25 the white sticker below the midi ports says "220 - 230 Volts"

So I'm confused as to what to do now.  Should I have got a 3 pronged UK plug with it?  I would have imagined that would be the case.

I don't know anything really about amps and volts.

 

I have another plug from my Blackstar HT Stage 100, which at the 3 pronged end says 5A 250v, and at the other end says 10A 250v.  Would that work for now..?  Please don't say yes unless you are 100% sure...

 

I've e-mailed the company I bought it from, but I was hoping to maybe get some feedback from people here in the meantime, thanks.


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#2 TheRealZap

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 09:58 AM

your blackstar cable should work... hopefully the company will send you one.


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#3 edstar1960

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 02:10 AM

Any standard amp "kettle" IEC lead will work.   Just ensure it is one with a 5A rating and NOT a 13A which is what you would use for an electric kettle!

 

If you ordered it from Thomann, then they will most likely just send you an adaptor so you can use their European supplied 2 prong mains plug in the UK 3 prong socket.   I had a similar incident with another product and that is what they did for me. 


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#4 kye90

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 03:50 AM

I have one of those converter plugs for use with a shaver, that you stick the 2 prong into so you can charge it in a UK 3 prong socket.

 

It says 'Shaver Only' on it, but I'm assuming that's because it only has a 1 amp fuse in it.  If I put a 5 amp fuse in there would that be safe to use also?

 

EDIT:

 

Thomann have replied to my e-mail and offered to send me one of these 4 options, but none of them are 5 amps like you've recommended..?

 

http://www.thomann.d..._power_cord.htm

http://www.thomann.d...owercord_3a.htm

http://www.thomann.d...ptor_eurouk.htm

http://www.thomann.d...ladaptor_uk.htm


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#5 edstar1960

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 04:33 AM

I have one of those converter plugs for use with a shaver, that you stick the 2 prong into so you can charge it in a UK 3 prong socket.

 

It says 'Shaver Only' on it, but I'm assuming that's because it only has a 1 amp fuse in it.  If I put a 5 amp fuse in there would that be safe to use also?

 

EDIT:

 

Thomann have replied to my e-mail and offered to send me one of these 4 options, but none of them are 5 amps like you've recommended..?

 

http://www.thomann.d..._power_cord.htm

http://www.thomann.d...owercord_3a.htm

http://www.thomann.d...ptor_eurouk.htm

http://www.thomann.d...ladaptor_uk.htm

 

5A fuse is standard for a guitar amp.   My DT25 ordered from a UK supplier came with an IEC power cord protected by a 5A fuse.

The fuse protects the device that is plugged in and is normally rated at a level that allows the device to take the power it needs but protect it from getting too much power if a fault occurs - so if there was a power surge then the fuse blows.

A 13A fuse is designed for devices like kettles and cookers that draw a lot of power to heat something up.  A 3A fuse is designed for devices like lighting lamps that take very little power and 5A fuses are for things like amps and TVs.

 

Options 1, 3 and 4 will work for you BUT option 2 is incorrect as it has the wrong connector for the back of the amp - the correct amp connector is shown in option 1.  

You can use a lead that has a 13A fuse in it because the amp won't draw more power than it needs BUT you run the risk of a power surge not being stopped at the plug and then blowing internal fuses in the amp and possibly damaging the internals or worse causing it to catch fire.  It is much safer to use the correctly rated fuse, so I recommend using 5A fuse for the DT25.  The first link above is for an IEC lead that comes with a 13A fuse, but it looks like it can easily be swapped out for a 5A, so I would probably go for that option and swap the fuse when it arrives.

 

Hope that clarifies things for you.  


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#6 kye90

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 01:41 PM

Thanks, I've requested the kettle plug they've offered, and I've ordered some 5A fuses off Amazon.

 

I'm using it with my Blackstar plug at the minute.  Is it normal to hear a slight 'buzz' from the tubes?  You wouldn't really notice it unless you're behind the amp with your head near the grill, but it's there.  Just want to check that it's normal...


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#7 edstar1960

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 03:38 AM

Thanks, I've requested the kettle plug they've offered, and I've ordered some 5A fuses off Amazon.

 

I'm using it with my Blackstar plug at the minute.  Is it normal to hear a slight 'buzz' from the tubes?  You wouldn't really notice it unless you're behind the amp with your head near the grill, but it's there.  Just want to check that it's normal...

 

I haven't noticed a buzz with mine but then again I have not stood behind it with my head near the grill, but mine does produce a mains hum as soon as it's switched on while still in standby, I guess that its just the transformer.  I also have a Fender Blues reissue and that doesn't make any noise when it's switched on - well none that I have noticed - neither hum or buzz.  I think all tube amps are prone to some level of "noise" and I think even the same make/models can differ between units.  Having said that, I am no expert and have not owned many tube amps, so I will leave the question for more experienced tube amp users to chime in with their answers.


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#8 ozbadman

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 11:50 AM

It says 'Shaver Only' on it, but I'm assuming that's because it only has a 1 amp fuse in it.  If I put a 5 amp fuse in there would that be safe to use also?

 

No. Do not do this. The fuse is also protecting the cable. If you try to draw 10A through a 1A rated wire, you will overheat the wire and start a fire.

 

You need to use a cable which is rated at least as high as the current your device is drawing, in this case, 10A. From what I recall, the DT25 has a fuse in it (I don't have mine here). If the DT25 has a fuse in it, there is no need for a separate fuse in the power cable, but the cable must still be rated at at least 10A.


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#9 kye90

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 02:21 PM

No. Do not do this. The fuse is also protecting the cable. If you try to draw 10A through a 1A rated wire, you will overheat the wire and start a fire.

 

There is no cable connected to this shaver converter that I mentioned.  It's just a plug head with a 1A fuse in it.  So the EU cable they sent me would get plugged directly into the back of it.  So I imagine it would be fine with a 5A fuse in it.

 

After all the hassle I'm not sure it was worth it.  I don't think the DT25 is giving me much better tones than I could get out of PodFarm.  Tomorrow I'll be working to establish just that; if they're just pretty much the same, and then the amp can go back.


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#10 ozbadman

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 03:20 PM

There is no cable connected to this shaver converter that I mentioned.  It's just a plug head with a 1A fuse in it.  So the EU cable they sent me would get plugged directly into the back of it.  So I imagine it would be fine with a 5A fuse in it.

 

The problem is the same. You have no way of knowing the current carrying capacity of internal wiring or connection blocks and could start a fire. The only guaranteed safe way is a converter plug that's rated for the voltage and current you will be carrying. Travel plug converters should be available cheaply at a local electronics shop. But again, check the ratings on the packet.


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