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What Is The Longest Time I Can Use A Dt50? 6 Hours Max?


Best Answer phil_m , 09 January 2014 - 04:03 PM

but to protect the amp from melting solderings or even worse the transformer or damaging something that can cause a risk of electric shock... If I blow a solid state there's no problem... but not a tube treasure...

 

Well, that's the thing, when these amps are tested, they're tested I imagine for running for very long periods of time - probably days, if not weeks. The solders, transformers, and other electrical are designed for continuous use. The thing that degrades electrical components is heat, and the components in the DT50 are designed to withstand the heat the amp produces for an indefinite time period. What happens with electrical equipment is that it warms up to a certain temperature, and then basically stays at that steady-state temperature until turn it off. There may some fluctuation in temperature based on how loud you're playing the amp, but it's probably not all that much.

 

Basically what I'm saying is that I wouldn't worried about playing the amp too much. It was designed to be played through. As long as you do the common sense things like use the standby switch when turning it on, avoiding turning the amp on as soon as you bring it in from a cold environment, and other typical tube amp care things, I don't think it's something you should really be worried about.

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#1 miguel_lopez

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 09:56 PM

I play for several hours a day, about 8 to 10 continuously

 

sometimes I split the playing time, 4 hours in the morning and some other 4 in the night, so I have time enought to get the amp to cool down and turn it on again for a second long time use

 

what would you say is fair enough using a tube amp continuously to turn it off in order to take care of the unit?

 

I have been searching a lot of this subject in the net but there are not forums with this topic, only about pre heat tubes and turn it off but I haven't found anything about the longest time you can use continuously a tube amp...

 

greetings

Miguel


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#2 phil_m

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 07:54 AM

There really shouldn't be a problem with using it continuously. In some ways, continuous use means less wear and tear on the components. But tubes do have a lifespan, so every hour you use it is using tube life, and eventually they'll have to be replaced. The more you use it, the faster that will happen.


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#3 miguel_lopez

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 12:16 PM

thank you very much Phil; however, when do you think it's fair enough in order to take care of an amp? and I'm not talking about the components, I know tubes have a "lifetime" but to protect the amp from melting solderings or even worse the transformer or damaging something that can cause a risk of electric shock... If I blow a solid state there's no problem... but not a tube treasure...


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#4 phil_m

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 04:03 PM   Best Answer

but to protect the amp from melting solderings or even worse the transformer or damaging something that can cause a risk of electric shock... If I blow a solid state there's no problem... but not a tube treasure...

 

Well, that's the thing, when these amps are tested, they're tested I imagine for running for very long periods of time - probably days, if not weeks. The solders, transformers, and other electrical are designed for continuous use. The thing that degrades electrical components is heat, and the components in the DT50 are designed to withstand the heat the amp produces for an indefinite time period. What happens with electrical equipment is that it warms up to a certain temperature, and then basically stays at that steady-state temperature until turn it off. There may some fluctuation in temperature based on how loud you're playing the amp, but it's probably not all that much.

 

Basically what I'm saying is that I wouldn't worried about playing the amp too much. It was designed to be played through. As long as you do the common sense things like use the standby switch when turning it on, avoiding turning the amp on as soon as you bring it in from a cold environment, and other typical tube amp care things, I don't think it's something you should really be worried about.


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Time is a train
Makes the future the past
Leaves you standing in the station
Your face pressed up against the glass

 


#5 miguel_lopez

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 08:45 PM

Thank you Phil

actually it makes sense; musicians are obsessive with practice, reharsals, long time song writing... even further: what about music fests? all day long using the same amps, all trademarks must have this authorization from forniture's laws n' stuff to let their invents be part of someone's live without risks... so now I get the idea, let's rock loud n' try to be safe anyway cuz a tube amp is not a toy, I really understand this last part...

cheerz!


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#6 gtrman100

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 03:18 PM

When playing gigs, I have a small ($8) fan that I put behind the amp to facilitate air flow to the chassis. If you are playing extended periods, I would do the same thing- heat damage is cumulative and the lower temps resulting from the improved air flow will extend tube and the amps life.


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