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Dangerous To Connect 2 L3m's And 2 L3s's Into One Socket?


Best Answer phil_m , 21 May 2013 - 06:44 AM

The actual rated electrical power consumption of the L3M and the L3S is 250W. So even with 4 connected to a single power strip, you'd be at 1000W. Assuming you have a 15A power strip, you'd still be well under the 1800W capacity. So you should be fine. Actually, using a power strip is usually a good thing to do. Assuming its fused, it gives you another level of circuit protection.

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#1 GracefulGideon

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 06:37 AM

Is it dangerous/not advised to plug all 4 of my speakers into 1 heavy duty power strip which would then simply be plugged into a wall socket? And if it is safe, is it also possible to still plug something into the 2nd input of that wall socket without tripping the circuit breaker?

Diagram below:

L3M                   L3M                  L3S                 L3S
  |                         |                        |                      |
  |                         |                        |                      |
  |                         |                        |                      |
  ---------------------POWER STRIP -------------------
                                      |
                                      |
                                      |

                              Wall Socket


thanks in advance my friends! :)


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#2 phil_m

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 06:44 AM   Best Answer

The actual rated electrical power consumption of the L3M and the L3S is 250W. So even with 4 connected to a single power strip, you'd be at 1000W. Assuming you have a 15A power strip, you'd still be well under the 1800W capacity. So you should be fine. Actually, using a power strip is usually a good thing to do. Assuming its fused, it gives you another level of circuit protection.


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#3 litesnsirens

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 07:13 AM

I did a sound gig a little over a week ago.  Everything on the stage was run off a single outlet.  Not necessarily my preference but more of a necessity based on the room.

 

I had my Monster power conditioning power strip plugged into one outlet of the wall.  From there, with a series of more power strips and extension cords there was the following;

2 L3s

2 L3t

3 L2t

1 Bose L1 model II

1 Traynor keyboard amp

2 keyboards

1 Fender Mustang amp

1 ampeg bass amp

1 Fender Floor effects pedal

2 Yorkville Led lighting modules (4 LED pars total).

 

Ran the whole night without a hitch...I'm not sure what the total draw would be on this but it worked out.


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#4 phil_m

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 07:20 AM

That is quite a lot on one circuit. I imagine, though, that most of the time the speakers aren't drawing anything near their rated wattage. The 250W rating would be at the maximum output.


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#5 NW-Harry

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 07:52 AM

That is quite a lot on one circuit. I imagine, though, that most of the time the speakers aren't drawing anything near their rated wattage. The 250W rating would be at the maximum output.

Is there some type of gadget/meter that can be connected to the wall plug that would report the amount of watts that are being used at any point it time on that plug/circuit? It would be interesting to see the watts being added up as more connections or power are added to this connection.


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#6 GracefulGideon

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 09:22 AM

Wow Phil, I definitely overestimated the power consumption of the speakers. I'm not very knowledgable in electricity so I based my error off of the L3M's being 1400w and the L3S's being 1200w. I will look online to learn more as well but is there maybe a simple explanation as to why the speakers are 1400 and 1200 watts yet actually only consume 250w of power each? I also agree with NW-Harry about whether there's a gadget out there can "report the amount of watts that are being used at any point it time on that plug/circuit".
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#7 dboomer

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 09:59 AM

Let me see if I can answer a few questions here ...

Amplifiers never develop their full continuous power when playing music. It depends on the material (live being the least demanding and recorded being the most) but typically music will only drive an amp to about 1/8th of it's continuous rating. It will however drive it to it's full peak rating so the peak rating is really a better indicator of amplifier sound quality in my book.

Because of this UL has manufacturers list the power needed for an amp while it is producing 1/8th power. This is the wattage requirement you see printed on gear. Sometimes subs running highly compressed music (EDM) run closer to about 1/3rd power. It just depends what the material is and how loud you are driving the system. So as a general rule you should be fine running 4 or 5 Line 6 speakers from a single breaker.

Lets talk about wall sockets. Typically the standard Edison wall socket (USA) is a 15a socket (garden variety wall socket). In your house it is usually attached to a 15A breaker, but in a commercial building (club, hotel, etc) it is probably connected to a 20A breaker. Always having more available than you need is desired. If you use a typical power strip it will have a 15a breaker in it, which is required by UL. So by using these strips you will never get any additional advantage if you plug into a 20a breaker because you will first be limited by the breaker in the strip.

I recommend using "quad boxes" as they do not have local breakers in them so you will likely get the benefit from a bigger breaker.

#8 phil_m

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 10:33 AM

Thank you, dboomer, for that explanation. I got the 250W off of the spec sheets for the speakers (the L3M is here, for example). I wasn't actually aware of the UL rule for speaker load ratings, but it makes sense. I often here people say "a watt is a watt", and that's true, but it depends on the actual load condition and when that will actually be seen. The acoustic side of dealing with speakers is much more complicated than the electrical side, at least when we're talking about power ratings and all that.

 

As far as the electrical load side, dboomer is correct too. Using a 15A power strip essentially acts like a bottleneck on the circuit if you're dealing with 20A breakers. If you need the extra 5A, there actually are 20A strips available. Personally, like I mentioned before, I appreciate having the extra circuit protection. The breaker at the board is really designed to protect the wire that's connected to the breaker, not necessarily the equipment downstream. Also, if you do accidentally trip the breaker in the strip, it's a heck a lot easier usually to reset that breaker rather try to find the panelboard in many venues.

 

For load monitoring, what you would need is ammeter. Ideally, you'd want one that could record peak demand over a certain time period. It would be an interesting little project to hook one up during a show to see the types of draws you get. There are a few meters I've seen that plug into a receptacle, but I think most of those are designed to measure energy, kWh. That really won't help in trying determine the peak loading of the circuit.


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#9 litesnsirens

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 05:07 PM

To be honest, I didn't even think about how much draw I was going to pull.  It was just so weird to be in a room where there so few electrical outlets.  I mean it's this really big room and I had to go into a closet behind the stage to find a single outlet.  But to be fair it held up.  I'll have to have a closer look at my Monster Power Strip, maybe it's one of those that is 20A.  It cost me $200 and it always gives me nice clean power but I have never really looked at what any of the ratings are.  I just assumed they were all standard 15A.


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#10 GracefulGideon

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 04:39 AM

wow, more than enough information and very interesting stuff as far as UL and the 1/8 power rule. Thanks so very much dboomer and Guru!

I'll maybe look into getting one of those ammeters, as that would be a cool little gadget to have when playing as various venues and just to feed my curiosity :)


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#11 dboomer

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 07:59 AM

  I'll have to have a closer look at my Monster Power Strip, maybe it's one of those that is 20A.  It cost me $200 and it always gives me nice clean power but I have never really looked at what any of the ratings are.  I just assumed they were all standard 15A.

 

If it has a 15A plug on it it will also be required to have a 15A breaker in it.  A 20A plug has one blade turned sideways and are not common.  You would probably do better using a quad box and not the power strip.  Most modern gear has regulated power supplies and doesn't benefit from external conditioning.

 

Even though the quad box will be rated for 15A there is no breaker in it so you will pick up extra current capacity when running sound equipment if it is plugged into a 20A wall breaker typical at commercial buildings. 

 

Something like this ...

 

http://www.markertek...c/SSPC-25.xhtml






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