Jump to content


Photo

Eq Spectrum Analyzer On Ipad? And ? On Eq Non L6 Speakers


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 JeffersteinVS

JeffersteinVS

    Iknowathingortwo

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 125 posts
  • LocationBoston

Posted 23 May 2013 - 08:25 AM

Thank you in advance!

 

So I Just got my 20d a few days ago. I noticed that the eq spectrum analyzer does not show on the Ipad? does anyone know if this is a option to turn on or off? or anyplans on adding that feature? I also noticed the mute mics and mute all is not visable on the Ipad version.

 

So i have a pair or Mackie monitors and FOH. has anyone else figured out a way to EQ out nodes and trouble frequencys? are we really limited to one 6band eq unless we purchase l6 speakers?


  • 0

Complete Dream Stage./JTV-59k/HD500X/RELAY G30  Guitar Player for VelvetSkies. 90's to Modern Party Rock Boston Ma. VelvetSkiesBand.com


#2 Digital-sound

Digital-sound

    Iknowathingortwo

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 398 posts

Posted 23 May 2013 - 07:18 PM

I think we are. Would be nice to have 32 band eq for monitors and FOH. For me, it is not much of a problem on monitors, and i use a DBX for FOH. But I do understand, and I wouldn't think it would be too hard to add. But I am not a programmer.
  • 0

#3 dboomer

dboomer

    Line 6 Staff

  • Moderator
  • 2777 posts

Posted 23 May 2013 - 07:45 PM

Because the mute button is mechanical it cannot be put on the iPad app.  And it has to be mechanical as if there were a software malfunction it wouldn't work ... right?

 

While it would be possible for the RTA to show up on iPad don't expect it as you have to move a lot of data and the iPad frame rate would get so slow you'd hate it.

 

There's not much you cannot do with a 6 band PEQ that a 1/3 oct GEQ can do.  You just ned to think about it a bit differently.  When you move a couple of sliders that are next to one another they really stop being single filters and combine to become a bigger one (same as the parametric).  The Mixer just acts as the controller for the GEQ in the speakers as the electronics are actually in the speaker's DSP.  There's just no more room inside the mixer itself.



#4 JeffersteinVS

JeffersteinVS

    Iknowathingortwo

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 125 posts
  • LocationBoston

Posted 24 May 2013 - 05:45 AM

Gotcha. The goal is to upgrade to l6 speakers in the future. for now I will try the 6 band to notch out feedback frequency's


  • 0

Complete Dream Stage./JTV-59k/HD500X/RELAY G30  Guitar Player for VelvetSkies. 90's to Modern Party Rock Boston Ma. VelvetSkiesBand.com


#5 Digital-sound

Digital-sound

    Iknowathingortwo

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 398 posts

Posted 24 May 2013 - 09:50 AM

The advantage of 1/3 oct GEQ over 6 band parametric, especially when using on stage monitors, is being able to notch out a narrow (1/3oct) frequency when feedback is a problem. With a 6 band, you have just that, 6 bands or areas to notch out. But the lower you make the Q setting, the more you are going to affect your overall sound. With the feedback detection in the channel as well, hopefully it isn't an issue anyway. I know when I had a 1/3oct GEQ on my monitors, we never used it. We did fine just eqing the monitor with the parametric EQ (4 band).
  • 0

#6 ArneLine6

ArneLine6

    Line 6 Staff

  • Product Management
  • PipPip
  • 374 posts

Posted 24 May 2013 - 10:55 AM

The Q setting allows you to set the parametric eq more or less narrow. If you use a parametric eq the problematic frequency can be notched out with much more precision than with a graphic eq. Using a the precise frequency and width (Q) with a parametric eq produces much less phasing problems compared to using a graphic eq.

The graphic eq is still useful to do some quick and more coarse adjustments.


  • 0

#7 dboomer

dboomer

    Line 6 Staff

  • Moderator
  • 2777 posts

Posted 24 May 2013 - 11:57 AM

"The advantage of 1/3 oct GEQ over 6 band parametric, especially when using on stage monitors, is being able to notch out a narrow (1/3oct) frequency when feedback is a problem."

 

1/3rd octave GEQs are called that because their spacing is a third of an octave apart.  But their filters are almost an octave wide so I would not consider them to be narrow.  So when you use one to notch feedback you are likely taking out a big chunk of usuable information from your signal.  Feedback OTOH always starts out as a single frequency sine wave.

 

If you typically use more than 6 notches to tame feedback you likely have some other issues that need to be solved before using EQs.



#8 litesnsirens

litesnsirens

    Gear Head

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 904 posts

Posted 24 May 2013 - 02:39 PM

I agree with this Don, but I have another question... which you have partially answered.  This thread got me wondering about the 1/3 graphic eq's and having used them in the past I have found that using them to notch out feedback has been kind of like using a meat cleaver to do surgery instead of a scalpel.  So the question is this, while I understand the filters are every 1/3 octave, what is the shape of each of the filters, are they bell, shelf that stops abruptly at the next filter?  Just curious...  I don't need to know now that I have the M20d it's just magic...

 

And I guess another question, I have stagesource speakers so this isn't for me but if a mic is feeding back through the monitors, even if they aren't stagesource monitors wouldn't the FBS notch that frequency out?  I mean the mic is still the source right? regardless of what speaker is feeding back into it...


  • 0

#9 Digital-sound

Digital-sound

    Iknowathingortwo

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 398 posts

Posted 25 May 2013 - 09:33 AM

"If you typically use more than 6 notches to tame feedback you likely have some other issues that need to be solved before using EQs.


I completely agree. Personally, I have only used a parametric eq, and it was only 4 bands, and have not had any problems. But I have listened to many wish they had a graphic eq. Guess I was speaking for them. For us, if we still have problems with feed back after getting a decent sound in the monitor, we generally look toward the guitar player and he knows it is time to turn down!
  • 0

#10 dboomer

dboomer

    Line 6 Staff

  • Moderator
  • 2777 posts

Posted 25 May 2013 - 11:06 AM

 while I understand the filters are every 1/3 octave, what is the shape of each of the filters, are they bell, shelf that stops abruptly at the next filter?

 

 

And I guess another question, I have stagesource speakers so this isn't for me but if a mic is feeding back through the monitors, even if they aren't stagesource monitors wouldn't the FBS notch that frequency out?  I mean the mic is still the source right? regardless of what speaker is feeding back into it...

 

The exact shape of the filters will vary a bit from brand to brand but they are generally a parabola.  They do not "stop" at the next center frequency position but rather they overlap, combine  and become wider.

 

While the mic is always part of the feedback loop any/every speaker that is on is also a part.  It generally works better in practice in most situations to do the correction at the mic (assuming the speakers have already been somewhat smoothed)



#11 litesnsirens

litesnsirens

    Gear Head

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 904 posts

Posted 25 May 2013 - 02:01 PM

Thanks, that makes sense. So it would make sense for bassforlife2013 to use the FBS on the M20d to tame feedback as opposed to even fumbling with the paraEQ. I mean the FBS on this board goes in with the precision of a surgeon and cuts out just the feedback. I've never used anything better for getting rid of feedback, it leaves your sound virtually unaffected. It's one of the nicest things about owning an M20d. I don't think you could do it as well with paraEQ. Certainly not with GEQ. Using the FBS will leave the paraEQ free to shape the sound of your speakers.
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users