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G90 Transmitter Pack - Battery Compartment Size


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#1 paulmapp8306

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 08:09 AM

Hi.  Just picked up a G90, and used the Duracell AAs that were included.  I had ordered some rechargeable batteries for the pack - however they dont fit ... the diameter of the battery is too thick for the transmitter. They are hiogh capacity batteries mind (one is 2900 MaH the other make I already had ate 2600 MaH)

 

Standard AA battery sizes are 14.5mm thick - and the rechargeable's are just about in that tolerance - however the Duracell's are nearer 14mm dead - and there a tight fit.

 

I have 3 makes if rechargeable's, and there all too thick (though some are thinner than others).  Some could be pushed in, but you wouldnt get them out again - some wont even push in.

 

So - a couple of questions.

 

1.  Why isnt the pack designed so that all AA batteries that conform to the maximum 14.5mm specification for AA batteries will fit.

2.  What make's and capacities of rechargeable battery will actually fit into the transmitter.

 

I dont want to keep buying different rechargeable's until I find ones that are suitable.

 

Many thanks

 

 


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#2 RonMarton

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 01:02 PM

Aaargh !

I've seen many instances of exactly the same issue with other brands of beltpack, other appliances and things like MagLite (or MagLite style) torches.

Sadly, even successive orders of the same model of AA rechargeable that initially fitted have subsequently yielded a battery too fat to fit, so just because one pair of (say) Eveready Energizers, Sanyo Eneloops or Tenergy Centuras fits now, there's no guarantee that those from another (supposedly identical) blister pack will also fit.

To my mind there's also a far more vital issue with regard to using rechargeables (or lithiums) in wireless systems that feature battery "fuel gauges", like your G90 ...and that is that they mostly indicate "full" right up to within about a minute of "collapse", at which point the "gauge" drops to "half", then the "one hour to go, DANGER !" warning flashes for only a few seconds before shutdown.

With this in mind, plus the excellent battery economy of Line 6 systems and the cheap prices of bulk packs of genuine Energizer and Duracell alkaline AAs from reputable, high volume outlets, I generally stick to whichever of those is "cheaper on the day".

I'd heartily recommend this strategy over possibly developing a twitch from repeatedly glancing over the shoulder at the "battery" LEDs while playing. :)
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#3 toneman2121

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 04:49 PM

http://www.batteryst....com/index.html

 

generally, rechargeable batteries, except alkaline, are less than 1.5vdc. line6 likes 1.5vdc in there devices so i guess the design the battery compartment specifically for batteries with dimensions that are rated 1.5vdc. that would be my guess.


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I'M SO HAPPY!


#4 BigChas52

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 06:34 PM

I second RonMarton's comments.  I did find rechargeable batteries that fit in the transmitter, albeit snugly, but I was dissatisfied with the performance.  I found that alkaline batteries lasted longer and gave more reliable readings as to battery life left.


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#5 paulmapp8306

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 12:44 AM

Ill see how it goes.

 

I sneeked into a supermarket - and tried 3/4 sets of batteries to see what fits.  Both Duracell 2000MaH and Energiser 2300 MaH batteries fit.  I picked up the higher rated energisers.

 

They are 1.2v - as are pretty much all rechargeables and they work OK.  They initially showed 720 minutes on my belt pack (low power setting) where as Duracell alkaline showed 900 when new. I had a rehersal last night and after that (2 hour rehearsal, but didnt have the pack on all the time) it showed 640 minutes.  That seems about right - but Ill monitor.  It doesnt bother me what the actual time I get out of the batteries are, as long as its enough for a set no problem, as Ill just recharge them post gig/rehearsal,  and Ive never had a device with a "fuel gauges" before.  Im sure its useful but its not a must have.

 

Anyway - I also ordered a 24 pack of Duracell alkaline - which cost the same as the 4 rechargeable's. I can use either batteries in other devices so Im not out of pocket as such.  If the rechargeable's prove to last long enough for my use - and the gauge is at least roughly acurate on lower power Ill stick with them.  If not I have plenty of normal alkaline's and Ill use them.

 

Thing is - I use the belt pack at home as well as gigs/rehearsals as my room isnt large, and the cable gets under chair wheels, rapped around my legs etc and its very annoying. given I play on average 4-5 hours a day, alkalines - even in bulk packs and given the decent life in the transmitter - will get expensive.  Thats around 1 pair every 2 days, or one bulk pack every 3-4 weeks.


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#6 RonMarton

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 02:15 AM

Sounds very much like the "horses for courses" situation, doesn't it ?

 

At this point, the multiple cries of "oh yeah !" (or something similar, from the many guitarists agreeing with your comments about being hamstrung by cabling) are audible all the way to Australia. 

 

I'm largely finding that those players who still resist wireless mainly do so because they fear a change to their tone and expression, such as is forced by the processing in most other systems, ...specifically those systems that require such processing (in a not entirely successful attempt) to overcome their vastly inferior transmission technology.

 

It's great that you've both found and shared a rechargeable solution ...and is also further proof that every situation demands consideration on its own merits, without any prejudice.

 

Another instance is my own "single use" purchase of expensive lithium batteries that I employ whenever guaranteed all-day endurance is needed from my Line 6 beltpacks, such as when I encase them first in disposable nitrile rubber gloves for water resistance ...and then fasten them into belts that are swapped between rugby referees.

 

The battery gauge then becomes irrelevant in much the same way as it seems to be for your rehearsal and practice sessions.


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#7 paulmapp8306

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 04:29 AM

Change in tone doesnt bother me (not that their is one) - as I use an Axe-FX2 rig, so the whole sound is a processed one.

 

My only gripe with the G90 - it knocks all my WiFi off - meaning I cand be online at the same time.  A pain if Im YouTubing or downloading files from Dropbox while practising.  Ive played with channels, and the best I get is the G90 on Ch1 and my Router on Ch 13 (the highest available).  With the transmitter on low power - I can still get internet access to work if I move away from my desk by a meter.  I cant surf easily but can do file transfer, play youtube etc.

 

I need more channels available on 2.6Ghz - or a 5Ghz capable Wifi system (the router and extender are both capable - my laptop isnt and no idea about tabs/phones/ipods).


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#8 RonMarton

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 07:53 AM

That 5GHz option would indeed be the simplest, unless you can easily replace your laptop's WiFi with a long USB or ethernet connection.

 

The most "future-proof" option, however, would be via an XD-V75 receiver (maybe borrowed ?) that you'd use as an "updater" to re-flash both your G90 receiver and its companion TBP12 beltpack with the latest firmware, which would not only grant you access to more options, but also access to Line 6's newer RF2 scheme of frequencies.

 

That RF2 scheme was specifically created with a view to enabling full interoperability "in and around" WiFi set-ups such as yours.

 

The main "snag" is that it's best to run the whole "Line 6 Monkey" online update process via a broadband set-up with no nearby WiFi, Bluetooth or other 2.4GHz radiation.

 

Aside from Line 6's "how to" videos via YouTube, here are three excellent step by step documents that'll give you a fuller picture:

 

http://line6.com/support/docs/DOC-2645

 

http://line6.com/support/docs/DOC-2583

 

http://line6.com/support/docs/DOC-2650

 

Alternatively, you may be able to arrange for (or bribe) your friendly local Line 6 representative to perform the updates for you. 


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#9 paulmapp8306

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 09:07 AM

Ill look into those options.

 

As an update to the lifespan of the rechargeable's.

 

Energiser 2300 MaH batteries show 640 to 720 minutes available when fully charges (no doubt due to the 1.2 not 1.5v they supply).  Standard Duracell Alkaline batteries show 840-900 minutes.  Thats  3 hours or so less expected life from the rechargable's.

 

The battery "life" reading seems fairly accurate though until around 320 minutes - thats on full power, where the life decrease's by 20 minutes every 20 minutes (or so) as expected.  It then only too a further hour for it to drop to 100 minutes.  I didnt run it all the way down - as this is the point where Id replace the batteries anyway - and certainly wouldn't start a new set.

 

Based on that - the useful lifespan from a set of fully charged batteries would seem to be around between 5 and 6 hours - against the nearer 14-15 hours of the standard Duracell Alkalines.  For me thats reasonable, as I can run 4 batteries - always having one set in the transmitter and a second fully charged set available to able for changes during breaks.  I cant see me ever needing 5 hours continuous use with no access to replacement batteries.  I would always carry at least one pair of Alkaline batteries anyway - in case the rechargeable's stopped holding their charge (as they get older).  How long it will take for this to happen is anyones guess at present - but Ill monitor this and post my findings down the line - probably several months at least.


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#10 RonMarton

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 11:32 AM

As a long-term user of rechargeables, you probably know this anyway, but for others who may not...

  • They almost never deliver their maximum capacity until they've been "cycled" a few times.
  • It's wise to arrange for their initial discharge to be "all the way", followed by an immediate full recharge.
  • A repeat of one of those deep discharge and full recharge cycles is advisable roughly once a month and
  • 1000 to 2000 discharge cycles would seem to be a typical lifespan, dependent on such things as ambient temperature and actual workload. 

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