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How Can I Record A Dry Signal From Pod Hd Desktop Via Usb?


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#41 JohanSmith

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 06:27 AM

They simply told you what was possible with this gear. Period.

 

If you really believe that, you must have missed the part where people tried to convince me a not-really-dry signal would suffice for my purposes.

 

Here's something you didn't know about professional audio engineers: most of us don't know whether the Line 6 POD HD can send a dry signal over USB. Most of us give relatively little thought to the POD HD.


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#42 JohanSmith

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 06:30 AM

And this why I think you already knew the answer to begin with.

 

Something's wrong with your thinking then, but you knew that when you took a simple issue and made it your platform to give speeches about your theories on how everyone should make music.


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#43 TheRealZap

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 06:32 AM

well... the HD Pro and HD PRO X both have direct analogue out....

but most audio engineers have a SPDIF input somewhere, or else it's worthwhile to get one...

that and you can use an ABY switch at the input if you need to....

using the USB out of a pod as the sole interface doesn't seem very audio engineer like to me... especially if you plan on giving it so little thought.

 

if analog dry over usb was a concern/factor in some decision... the answer is No... so why beat up others on the forum... clear as a bell...no gray area.


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#44 smrybacki

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 06:33 AM

If you really believe that, you must have missed the part where people tried to convince me a not-really-dry signal would suffice for my purposes.

 

Here's something you didn't know about professional audio engineers: most of us don't know whether the Line 6 POD HD can send a dry signal over USB. Most of us give relatively little thought to the POD HD.

Well fabulous.  Except I gave you the straight up answer in post 3.  No sugar coating, no cajoling and no bull.  I can read and had no problem understanding people's intent here.  It's good you are a professional audio engineer I guess, but your people skills are so miniscule, an electron tunneling microscope would have trouble locating them.  Frankly at this point, I wouldn't walk across the street to lollipop on you if you were on fire.


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However you play music using whatever gear you may choose that day-- the JOY of making it is the heart of it.

 


#45 JohanSmith

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 06:37 AM

Those are all good questions concerning the sample rates I've tried 16 and 24 and as far as I can tell they both sound good for what I do with them, but I'm always open for learning about these things.

 

It's like this: If you have 16-bit and 24-bit versions of the same thing, and you play them on your speakers, you probably will not hear a difference. But if you process them heavily, adding distortion and other FX, you will hear a big difference in the results. If you start with 16 bits and process it heavily, the results will include tons of noise.

 

This is why just listening isn't always a good way to decide whether something is right for your purposes, and the math underlying the sound is important.


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#46 JohanSmith

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 06:40 AM

... most audio engineers have a SPDIF input somewhere, or else it's worthwhile to get one...

 

I'm one of the audio engineers who has had no recent use for SPDIF, but I still have every need for high-fidelity audio processing; so now you know that not all audio engineers have SPDIF.

 

 

... using the USB out of a pod as the sole interface doesn't seem very audio engineer like to me... 

 

Really, and why does it seem that way to you? I was trained here:

 

https://ccrma.stanford.edu/

 

I've worked for Intel and Creative Labs. Were Stanford, Intel, and Creative Labs all mistaken to consider me an audio engineer, since I don't have SPDIF? What do you know about audio engineering that Stanford, Intel, and Creative Labs don't know?


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#47 TheRealZap

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 06:48 AM

I'm not going to get into a member measuring contest with you... 

you need to quit assuming that noone here knows anything....

(we all have our strengths etc... and i have a resume as well...)

ok... so you don't have SPDIF....

guess what... i think you've identified a need for it.

 

 

I'm one of the audio engineers who has had no used for SPDIF, but I still have every need for high-fidelity audio processing; so now you know that not all audio engineers have SPDIF.

 

 

 

Really, and why does it seem that way to you? I was trained here:

 

https://ccrma.stanford.edu/

 

I've worked for Intel and Creative Labs. Were Stanford, Intel, and Creative Labs all mistaken to consider me an audio engineer, since I don't have SPDIF? What do you know about audio engineering that Stanford, Intel, and Creative Labs don't know?


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#48 Brazzy

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 07:17 AM

https://ccrma.stanford.edu/

 

I've worked for Intel and Creative Labs. Were Stanford, Intel, and Creative Labs all mistaken to consider me an audio engineer, since I don't have SPDIF? What do you know about audio engineering that Stanford, Intel, and Creative Labs don't know?

 

I hope you got some good info out of all this, but in hindsight I think you should warn people of the level of education you have so you don't wind up with people like me (amateur) trying to help you (put it in a signature or in your posts). Even if I strayed off the topic a bit you should be able to exclude the info that doesn't concern you and keep going on the straight and narrow especially considering your education on the subject. You could probably help many people with the knowledge you have. I even apologized in public. I will try not to give opinionated examples in the future.

 

Thanks for the info about the differences of 16 and 24 bit samples. It's much appreciated.


Edited by Brazzy, 23 April 2014 - 11:07 AM.

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#49 JohanSmith

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 02:41 PM

I'm not going to get into a member measuring contest with you... 

 

Probably a good idea, so why did you try to start with this:

 

... doesn't seem very audio engineer like to me...


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#50 JohanSmith

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 02:42 PM

in hindsight I think you should warn people... (put it in a signature or in your posts).

 

and I think some people here should put in their sig-line that when they say 'dry' they don't really mean dry.


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#51 v_pilk

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 01:58 AM

POD HD desktop converts the analog signal it receives at the guitar input into digital by utilizing the A/D converter onboard - I very much doubt the unit has 2 separate A/D converters for USB and SPDIF. For a DAW/computer to record the guitar signal (no matter dry or processed) the signal has to be digitized at some point, hence no way to avoid A/D conversion. Hence, it is not correct to call an A/D converted guitar signal "not truly dry". It is truly dry - the only difference is that one is "analog dry", the other is "digital dry", and both are "truly dry".

 

That's the A/D conversion referred to in the post with the "truly dry / not truly dry" discussions (the digital signal is converted back to analog to be routed to the L/R outs and headphones out only).

 

Both USB and SPDIF carry the digital signal so I guess the actual difference between the "dry over SPDIF" and "dry via L or R channel path over USB" is that the first is like as direct as possible in the POD HD and the second is passing through the amp sim / FX processing chain with all FX set to "no FX" or ie "bypassed", which may or may not affect the original quality of the already digitized dry guitar signal and also maybe affected by a potential crosstalk from the other channel path that has amp sim and FX turned ON. I don't know how significant or negligible this crosstalk is, or wether it is there or not but it may be there, potentially. Hope that helps clarify things, and definitely please feel free to correct me if I made a mistake anywhere in here :)


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#52 Brazzy

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 06:28 AM

POD HD desktop converts the analog signal it receives at the guitar input into digital by utilizing the A/D converter onboard - I very much doubt the unit has 2 separate A/D converters for USB and SPDIF. For a DAW/computer to record the guitar signal (no matter dry or processed) the signal has to be digitized at some point, hence no way to avoid A/D conversion. Hence, it is not correct to call an A/D converted guitar signal "not truly dry". It is truly dry - the only difference is that one is "analog dry", the other is "digital dry", and both are "truly dry".

 

That's the A/D conversion referred to in the post with the "truly dry / not truly dry" discussions (the digital signal is converted back to analog to be routed to the L/R outs and headphones out only).

 

Both USB and SPDIF carry the digital signal so I guess the actual difference between the "dry over SPDIF" and "dry via L or R channel path over USB" is that the first is like as direct as possible in the POD HD and the second is passing through the amp sim / FX processing chain with all FX set to "no FX" or ie "bypassed", which may or may not affect the original quality of the already digitized dry guitar signal and also maybe affected by a potential crosstalk from the other channel path that has amp sim and FX turned ON. I don't know how significant or negligible this crosstalk is, or wether it is there or not but it may be there, potentially. Hope that helps clarify things, and definitely please feel free to correct me if I made a mistake anywhere in here :)

 

Sounds about right to me and I think you did a great job of explaining it without coloring it, lol. :)


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#53 v_pilk

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 09:06 AM

Thank you :)


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