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POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by fechart on 2012-06-11 16:28:39

Does anybody have used a Spectum Analizer to create patches on the POD HD 500?

There´s a guy on the web that uses one to create awesome patches with the BOSS GT-10, he sells them...

Check it out and listen to them:

http://www.jameslimborg.com/boss-gt-10-patches-download.html

It would be wonderful if somebody does this and shares!!!



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by mdmayfield on 2012-06-11 16:45:05

It's not the tool; it's the expertise of the person using it.

Someone unskilled at dialing in tones won't suddenly get killer sounds just by using a spectrum analyzer, though it might help avoid the absolute worst buzzy or muddy sounding tones.

Someone skilled at dialing in tones, who knows the sound they want and what frequencies to adjust to get it, might use a spectrum analyzer to get to those tones *faster* than they could otherwise, but they still could find those sound without the analyzer.

Plus, how would the author selling these patches know what they will sound like with anyone else's guitar(s) and playing technique? It's like people believe patches are somehow magical, like they are something more than what they are: just a list of numbers saying where every dial and option is set. That's all a patch is, nothing more.

It's like paying $10 for "patches" for a Fender Deluxe, and for your money, you get an emailed Word document that says stuff like:

WICKED BLUES TONE - Gain 5, Bass 3, Mids 6, Treble 5

SUPER SHRED METAL - Gain 10, Bass 9, Mids 3, Treble 6

Not a good investment if you ask me.



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by jameslimborg on 2012-06-11 17:11:59

Hello Fechart,

The spectrum analyzer that I use is in the Creamware TripleDAT version 2.53 software; It's a 64-band spectrum analyzer [You can see it in the video below].  I bought that software around 1996; and Creamware filed bankruptcy around 1998; I was told all of the Tech. guys that worked at Creamware left; and now the company is called Sonic Core (Their website is sonic-core.net).  The Creamware TripleDAT 2.53 software only works with old computer systems running Windows 95/98/ME [I am running Windows ME], Creamware hardware [I am using the Creamware TDAT16 PC audio card which connects to a Creamware A16 (AD/DA converter) with 4 fiber-optic cables, and works best with certain PC computer motherboards (I am using a MSI K7 Master MS-6341 motherboard).  It would be very difficult finding the old Creamware software and hardware that I use today. 

I have tried a lot of the free spectrum analyzers available on the internet and none of them display accurate information; They are all useless [At least to me; I wouldn't be able to get any use out of them].  But I can tell you how to test a spectrum analyzer to see if it is as good as the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer that I use; Watch my video below; Specifically watch my Van Halen Eruption audio sample in the video below; Now notice after the first chord (which is A) and the next note that I slide up to... the next 2 notes notice how they pop up on the spectrum analyzer at 187Hz and 208Hz [That is the kind of detail I need to see]; Now, go to my website here: http://www.jameslimborg.com/boss-gt-10-patches-download.html and download ALL of my audio samples [There is a link on my website that allows you to download all of my audio samples in one .zip file]; Now listen to my Van Halen Eruption audio sample through any spectrum analyzer you want and see if it also kicks up at 187Hz and 208Hz like the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer does in my video for my Van Halen Eruption audio sample; I have not found any spectrum analyzers that do.  Now in addition to that... I also need each frequency band to have 3-groups of lights (green on the bottom, yellow in the middle, red at the top); And I need each of those groups of lights to have individual lights so I can see exactly how far each frequency goes into the green, yellow, red areas!  That is very important; A lot of spectrum analyzers I have found on the internet fade from one color into the next making it very difficult for me to see exactly how high each frequency is going in volume.  Another important feature with the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer is that it has 64-individual frequency bands (rather than just 16 or 32) and it displays each of the 64 individual frequencies along the bottom in yellow from 20Hz all the way up to 20kHz; Some spectrum analyzers don't even show you the frequency numbers along the bottom (making it impossible to know what frequency is doing what).  I have talked with Sonic Core (who use to be Creamware) and they said they could make a 64-band spectrum analyzer (as a plugin for music recording software) as good or better than their old Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer because they have high-resolution technology these days; But before they spend a year or so creating such a device they have to find a way people cannot steal their software; They don't want to spend a year or so making a new 64-band spectrum analyzer and have people steal it and post it on the internet for free; which is what happens to a lot of software; So, This could mean that Sonic Core will never get around to making a new 64-band spectrum analyzer. 

I hope someday someone makes a 64-band spectrum analyzer as good as the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer that I use today; All the spectrum analyzer that I have tried to date are useless because they do not display accurate information [Do the test I mentioned above to see for yourself].



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by jameslimborg on 2012-06-11 18:35:44

There is some truth to your comment, "It's not the tool; it's the expertise of the person using it.".  I would not be able to copy guitar sounds consistantly well (or nearly as accurate) if I did not use the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer.  The 64-band spectrum analyzer shows me exactly where to set each of the 64 frequency bands (from 20Hz up to 20kHz);  I simply view the guitar sound I am trying to copy through the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer (like the intro to Van Halen, You Really Got Me for example) over and over and while doing so memorizing a few frequencies at a time how high (in volume) they are bouncing;  Then with my guitar (using a similar guitar sound) I record myself playing the same chords/notes (for the intro to Van Halen, You Really Got Me for example) and then view my guitar playing through the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer; I then adjust the Graphic/Parametric EQ's on my guitar sound so my guitar sound moves all 64-frequency-bands at the same volume level.  The perfect effects processor would have a 64-band Graphic EQ, but to date none do; So I have to do the best I can with a 10-band Graphic EQ in the BOSS GT-10; And sometimes I need to do more adjustments but can't because the effects processor I am using won't let me; For example, For my Van Halen Eruption patch I needed to push up another frequency but couldn't because I ran out of Parametric EQ frequencies that I could edit; So I was not able to copy that guitar sound as well as I would have if I had a 64-band Graphic EQ to work with.  I hope someday their is an effects processor that can listen to one sound (the sound you want to copy), and then you play the same guitar chords/notes with your guitar (using a similar guitar sound) and it will automatically set the full-resolution (128-band or more) graphic EQ where it should be so your guitar moves all the frequencies at the same volume levels (making your guitar sound really close to the original guitar sound you wanted to copy).  So, I think this part (viewing the guitar sound you want to copy through a spectrum analyzer, then viewing your guitar sound through the spectrum analyzer and making adjustments to the Graphic/Parametric EQ so your guitar sound moves all the frequencies at the same volume level) could be done by anyone; It's just very time consuming; It takes me at least 3 to 29 hours to copy the frequencies (1 to 3 days work; usually 1 day); Because I can only adjust a few frequencies at a time, making little adjustments, checking, checking again, making more adjustments until I get the frequency volumes just right; It's a very slow process; You really have to want to copy a guitar sound to go through all this effort and time.  Then after successfully copying all of the frequency volumes, a person does need some expertise (and a good ear) to add all of the effects (chorus, reverb, delay, pitch shifter, etc.).  I often have to do some research on the guitar sound I am copying before I attempt to copy it; For example, When I made a patch for Van Halen, Pretty Woman I didn't know what effect Eddie Van Halen was using on his guitar for that song; I learned on the internet it was chorus; Before researching that I thought maybe it was Flanger; So a person does need some expertise on the sound he/she is copying; and have a good ear when applying the right amounts of reverb, delay, chorus, phaser, flanger, pitch shifter, etc.  And I don't consider myself having the best expertise for copying guitar sounds; I am able to copy guitar sounds really well because I am the only person using a Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer to copy guitar sounds with; I do have experience writing, recording, producing my own music... and that helps when it comes to knowing if I need to add reverb (what reverb settings), delay/chorus/pitch-shifter/etc. (and all the settings for those effects).  The perfect person for copying guitar sounds would be a professional producer and guitarist; I have experience with both, but I am not a professional producer; I have only produced my own original music.

It is impossible for any-person to copy all of the frequencies accurately of a guitar sound without a spectrum analyzer.  There are nearly 20,000 individual freqencies from 20Hz all the way up to 20kHz/20,000Hz; Good luck knowing where each of those frequencies should be without a spectrum analyzer; If you have ever tried to copy a guitar sound you will know how frustrating it can be trying; You get it kind of right, but not, and the next day it doesn't sound nothing like you had hoped; You can't do it without a spectrum analyzer; You may get some of the more noticeable frequencies higher in volume as they should be, but most of the frequencies you will not get where they should be without a spectrum analyzer.  One example; For one of the BOSS GT-10 patches that I made the spectrum analyzer had me push all 9 out of 10 Graphic-EQ frequency bands down as far as I could go (-12dB) but push the 16kHz frequency as high as I could go (+12dB); I would never know that I had to do that to capture the guitar sound I was trying to copy. Another example: Sometimes I have to push up a certain frequency as high as I can go, but that is not high enough so I have to select the same frequency using a different Parametric EQ and push up that same frequency even more; I would never know to do that without the spectrum analyzer telling me that frequency needed to go much higher.

Me being the author of BOSS GT-10 Patches by James Limborg... I didn't know how well my patches would work for other people; I did the best I could to make my patches sound best for everyone; Including, NOT using a guitar amp, but instead using my Event 20/20bas studio monitors which have a full and flat 20Hz to 20kHz frequency response; I knew that if I wanted the BOSS GT-10 or any guitar effects processor to be able to copy ALL guitar sounds it had to support ALL frequencies [Guitar amps do NOT support all frequencies, but instead only support from about 150Hz to 5,000Hz... So that means with a guitar amp you won't hear the low-bass 20Hz to 100Hz frequencies or the high-treble 7,000Hz to 20,000Hz frequencies).  I am copying studio guitar sounds which have been recorded using a microphone, compressed (which brings up the low-bass 20Hz to 100Hz and high-treble 7,000Hz to 20,000Hz frequencies), and produced by a producer (which will increase low-bass/high-treble frequencies sometimes as well); I personally like stereo studio-recorded guitar sounds better than mono-LIVE guitar sounds [For example: The intro to Van Halen, You Really Got Me has the guitar in the left-speaker allowing you to hear the reverb really well in the right-speaker; That alone is a cool effect].  So as long as someone uses full and flat (20Hz to 20kHz) frequency response speakers (Examples: powered studio monitors, PA speakers, headphones, home stereo system, computer audio system, keyboard amp), and use the same pickup-setting my patches will sound as they should.  I have had a lot of people buy my BOSS GT-10 patches and 99% of those people are happy; I did have a couple people that were not happy because one person bought one of my acoustic guitar patches thinking it would make his electric guitar sound like an acoustic guitar (even though it said that that patch was for an acoustic guitar); and another person was not happy because he was using a guitar amp [On my website it says not to use a guitar amp with my BOSS GT-10 patches]; Every guitar amp has its own unique sound; And that means every guitar amp will change my BOSS GT-10 patches differently; So my website says NOT to use a guitar amp and instead use some powered studio monitors, PA speakers, keyboard amp (or two keyboard amps placing them 10' apart for a full stereo effect), high quality home stereo system, headphones, computer audio system; Basically anything you would connect a CD player to you should connect a guitar effects processor to (if you want your guitar effects processor to be able to copy ALL guitar sounds).  For a test, connect a CD player to a guitar amp and then compare how that sounds to connecting the same CD player to some studio monitors, or PA speakers, headphones, keyboard amp, home stereo system, computer audio system; You will NOT like the sound of the CD player through a guitar amp as well as you will through some studio monitors, or PA speakers, headphones, keyboard amp, home stereo system, computer audio system because a guitar amp changes the sound (because guitar amps do not have a full or flat frequency response; as I mentioned above).  My ability at copying guitar sounds is magical due using the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer allowing me to copy guitar sounds so well; Having sold a lot of my BOSS GT-10 patches and having nearly all of my customers happy and satisfied means what I am doing is working; And that is what keeps me making more patches for people to use.  I consider all of my favorite guitar sounds magical; And copying them makes my guitar sound magical as well; It's awesome.  I wish more people would copy guitar sounds as I have been doing (with a 64-band spectrum analyzer); First, the world needs to create a 64-band (even better a 128-band) spectrum analyzer as good as the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer that I currently use.

When someone buys one of my BOSS GT-10 patches via PayPal, I get an email that says someone purchased a BOSS GT-10 patch; I then email the person the BOSS GT-10 patch file (not a Microsoft WORD document); That person can then import that BOSS GT-10 patch file into their BOSS GT-10 and all of the parameters and settings for that 1-patch are instantly in their BOSS GT-10 to enjoy.  People who buy ALL of my BOSS GT-10 patches I email them one .mid file which contains all of my BOSS GT-10 patches; They can then import that one .mid file into their BOSS GT-10 and all (currently 164) patches are installed into their BOSS GT-10 almost instantly (rather than importing 1 at a time).  These patch files can be saved onto your computer and/or cd for backup purposes.

For some people it is not a good investment; But for others it is.  Not everyone likes Van Halen, Boston, AC/DC, or music that I have made patches for; If you must have the same studio guitar sound as Eddie Van Halen, then the closest you will get is with my BOSS GT-10 patches.  I hope someday more people copy guitar sounds using a spectrum analyzer and I hope people can copy guitar sounds better than I can; I just want to influence other guitarists to copy guitar sounds as good or better than I can using a spectrum analyzer; Some people don't care about having the same sound as Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Eddie Van Halen, Stevie Ray Vaughan, etc.  But I do; And many other guitarists do as well; Most guitar effects processors do not come with awesome sounding patches; It's like making a coffee machine, but selling it with low-quality coffee; Sometimes people like my patches because it gets them closer to the sound they want; not so much because they wanted that specific artists guitar sound, but they wanted a sound that was closer to what they wanted... and then they can change it to exactly what they wanted. 

Anyways; I hope this information helps some people.



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by mdmayfield on 2012-06-12 06:42:18

Well, it's a free country; good luck with your business of selling patches.



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by phil_m on 2012-06-12 06:47:25

Holy wall of text, Batman!



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by jimsreynolds on 2012-06-12 11:58:46

Not half!  James, you really need to break that badboy up.  I am sure you are making some blinding points  there but my brain simply refuses to let me try and read your post, as it stands.   Paragraphs are your friend !!



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by cgtrox on 2012-06-12 22:44:42

Nice job bro! I like the Boston, Eagles and Van Halen ones best. I know it's a lot of work to do what you did, kudos man. Nice playing on the samples, too!

cgtrox



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by jameslimborg on 2012-06-12 22:59:56

Thanks; I can only copy guitar sounds using the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer if I have just the guitar sounds I am copying (without any other instruments; drums, other guitars, vocals, bass guitar, keyboards, etc.).  I had the guitar tracks for most of the Van Halen and all of the Boston songs; That is why they turned out so well; But I did not have the guitar tracks to Van Halen Unchained or Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love; So I will be updating those patches someday soon (now that I do have just the guitar tracks for those songs; I should be able to copy the sounds to those songs much better now).



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by killergege on 2012-06-13 03:58:41

I hope someday their is an effects processor that can listen to one sound (the sound you want to copy), and then you play the same guitar chords/notes with your guitar (using a similar guitar sound) and it will automatically set the full-resolution (128-band or more) graphic EQ where it should be so your guitar moves all the frequencies at the same volume levels (making your guitar sound really close to the original guitar sound you wanted to copy).

A recent update of the Axe FX II added a feature that looks a lot like that. Not sure it is a "128-band or more" EQ but it seem to do a pretty good job.

And it works like you explain : make a "basic" tone, sample a guitar sound from a "clean" (with no other instruments) recording, play the same chords with your guitar => the Axe FX changes the parameters of the tone to match the recording.

It seems really impressive !



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by jameslimborg on 2012-06-13 16:10:57

Hello Killergege, Yes, I saw the demo of that feature; It appeared to copy the one clean sound they used as an example well from what I remember; I cannot afford that device to try it out; They should show examples of that feature with a variety of different guitar sounds to show how well it works; I know the effects (reverb, delay, chorus, etc.) would have to be added after the device copies the frequencies; and a person would have to use their ear to add those effects [I do not know if it is possible for a device to automatically add the necessary effects or not).  I would also want to see for myself using my Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer to see how closely it is copying the guitar sounds; A machine like this could have a full-resolution frequency analyzer (meaning it would adjust all frequencies from 20Hz up to 20,000Hz and not just 64 or 128 individual frequencies).  I use a 64-band spectrum analyzer (which separates all 20,000 frequencies into just 64-frequency bands), and the BOSS GT-10 has a 10-band Graphic EQ; So I am adjusting only 10-bands in the BOSS GT-10 Graphic EQ when copying guitar sounds; as well as adjusting 4 individual frequencies using two Parametric EQ's in the BOSS GT-10 as well; And most of the time I can get the frequencies really close to where they need to be; not perfect, but really close.  The perfect setup for me (copying guitar sounds manually) would be a 128-band spectrum analyzer and a guitar effects processor with a 128-band Graphic EQ (or at the very least a 64-band spectrum analyzer which is what I use now, but with a guitar effects processor that has a 64-band Graphic EQ instead of just 10-bands like the BOSS GT-10 has); The problem with just a 10-band Graphic EQ is that when I move 1 of the 10-bands it moves a bunch of OTHER frequencies I did not want to move; so it becomes a battle to get ALL the frequencies where I need them; Lots of extra time spent molding the frequencies to where they need to be.  So a device with a full-resolution frequency analyzer could copy guitar sounds perfect and faster.



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by jimsreynolds on 2012-06-14 04:43:16

Thing is, even with spectrum analyser and the knowhow to use it:  EQ on the Pod is a bit of a blunt instrument (as may have been mentioned once or twice in the past).  The best you could do is EQ in the ballpark of the sweet spots revealed by the software and that kind of defeats the point right?

How do you factor in dynamics with the spectrum analyser as a tonebuilding tool?  I mean that is the one of the big challenges with modelling in the first place and part of the sell for the HD, AxeFX etc?  I guess maybe it is effective on a high gain tone where things are compressed by the gain but surely it can't really be that effective with the mid/lower gain tones can it?

(sorry - having a glass half empty day !)



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by mazuwa on 2012-06-14 06:05:46

Same to different pickup dynamics, strings, wood behavior, etc, and you can only compare same playing technique / artist with same dynamics.

And how about modulation sounds, wah.sound, etc.? (e.g. comparing time of opened wah with closed wah). 

But you can transfer sounds from one device you own to another device (don't be too perfect). So you know about the sound setup. Of course you choose comparable amps / sounds. You may e. g. record your unprocessed guitar to stay as precise as possible, then process the sounds from your two devices, record it, and finally let them compare to find out the curves and peaks.

For me it is sufficiant to find just a similar sound.

Example: Original peak at 2.5 khz +6db: My Pod offers a slider at 2.2 khz. Then compare the result again with your old sound to get sure what has changed! Finally listen to it with your ears, do some little modification and forget about the analyser!



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by jameslimborg on 2012-06-14 15:44:32

jimsreynolds, The Roland BOSS GT-10 has a 10-band Graphic EQ (30Hz, 60Hz, 125Hz, 250Hz, 500Hz, 1kHz, 2,5kHz, 4,1kHz, 8kHz, 16kHz) so I first use that, and then the EQ section has a Parametric-EQ that lets me adjust 2 individual frequencies by scrolling through a list of frequencies and selecting the frequency that is closest to the one I want to adjust; The problem is it skips a bunch of frequencies (not allowing me to pick the exact frequency I want to adjust); so sometimes I cannot select the frequency I need to adjust; and so I have to pick a frequency that is next to it; End result is the patch I make does not sound as good as it could have with a full-resolution Parametric-EQ.  After adjusting 2 individual frequencies in the EQ section I can add another Parametric-EQ to the FX1/FX2 section and adjust another 2 individual frequencies (if I need to).  So, with the BOSS GT-10 (guitar effects processor) I can adjust 10 frequency bands using the Graphic EQ, and 4 individual frequencies (using the Parametric-EQ in the EQ and FX1/FX2 sections).  So my question is... What EQ-ing options do you have in the Line 6 POD HD (500/1000/PRO)?  Yes, You would do the best you can do getting the frequencies where they should be; That is what I do with the Roland BOSS GT-10; Often times I cannot get it perfect because the limitations of the Roland BOSS GT-10 not having a 64-band Graphic EQ and not letting me pick any frequency I want with the Parametric EQ's (or letting me move more than just 4 individual frequencies; Sometimes I need to move more than just 4 individual frequencies, but I can't because I only can move 4 individual frequencies with the BOSS GT-10).  So you just get the frequencies as close as you can to where they should be; Then at least you know you did the best you could with the guitar effects processor you are using to get that sound you wanted.

Dynamics is the compressor; That is also very important; With the 64-band spectrum analyzer I view the loudest and quietest notes and I can see how loud and quiet they go; Then I adjust the Compressor so when I play those same guitar parts my playing also goes as loud and quiet as the guitar sound I am copying.  For Jazz patches I may have the compressor OFF (because Jazz and Classical musicians play with lots of dynamic range; from very quiet to very loud; Clean sounds usually need a lot more compression than distortion sounds do (from what I've learned making BOSS GT-10 patches).  I try to use the least amount of Compression that I can because compression brings up the noise (buzzing, hissing sounds); I also try to have compression up loud enough for the right amount of sustain; So I use a combination of what I see in the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer (how high each frequency goes when I strum a loud chord/note, how low in volume each frequency goes as the note/chord fades out or when playing quietly) and what I hear (noise, hiss, sustain).  I knew that if I was going to use one guitar multi-effects processor to copy ALL guitar sounds (Jazz, rock, country, etc.) I needed an effects processor that had the most dynamic range (least amount of compression); The VOX Tonelab and Line 6 POD HD all had way too much compression (even with the Compressor turned OFF); The Roland BOSS GT-10 had the most dynamic range so I stayed with the Roland BOSS GT-10.  So, Using the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer also helps me set the compression amount [as I mentioned above]; Doesn't matter what tone (clean, crunch, full distortion) the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer shows me the volumes of all the frequencies from 20Hz to 20kHz when a note/chord is struck hard/loud, shows me the volumes of all the frequencies when that chord/note fades out, and shows me the volumes of all the frequencies when a person is playing quietly; So it's a combination of making changes in the Compressor effect and then viewing my playing with that Compression setting through the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer to see if my guitar playing is moving the frequencies the same as the guitar sound I am trying to copy.  If the compression amount is too low the note/chord will fade out too quickly (going too quiet); I can see this in the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer; It looks like this... all the frequencies may hit the right amount of volume when I strike the note/chord, but then the volume of all the frequencies immediately fall down quickly (not holding the volume well because there isn't enough compression). 



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by spikey on 2012-06-14 16:00:48

Sounds pretty awesome sauce to me james altho a bit over my paygrade.

Thank you for sharing your wisdom here, in an otherwise "blunt" Line-6  world...



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by jameslimborg on 2012-06-14 16:32:36

mazuwa, Regarding pickup dynamics, strings, wood behavior, etc.; PICKUPS: The main thing with pickups is you want to use the correct pickup setting (bridge/lead, middle, rhythm/neck pickups and in single or dual-coil/humbucker modes).  So if a person is using my Van Halen, You Really Got Me BOSS GT-10 patch, they should use the lead/bridge pickup in dual/humbucker mode for that patch I made to sound its best.  There is a major difference in sound using the lead/bridge pickup vs. using the rhythm/neck pickup; And there is a major difference using a single-coil pickup vs. a dual/humbucker pickup.  So it's important to use the same pickup setting that I used for all of my patches.  My Steinberger GL7TA electric guitar has two EMG-89 pickups (EMG-89 pickups can work in both single and dual-coil modes; Allowing my guitar to sound like a Gibson Les Paul and a Fender Stratocaster/Telecaster; Not exact, but it gets me really close.).  Yes, there are all kinds of picups in this world and each one sounds a little different, but as long as you are using the same pickup setting as I was for my BOSS GT-10 patches you will be happy with the sound you are getting; I know this because I have sold a lot of BOSS GT-10 patches and 99% of the people who have purchased my BOSS GT-10 patches are really happy; The 1% consists of 2 people... One person was mad because he bought some of my acoustic guitar patches thinking they would make his electric guitar sound like an acoustic (even though next to the patch title it said that this patch was made with an acoustic guitar); and another person wasn't happy with the sound of the patches he purchased because he was using a guitar amp (My website says NOT to use a guitar amp and says to use some powered studio monitors, PA speakers, keyboard amp, home stereo system, computer audio system, headphones... anything you'd connect a CD player to; Guitar amps don't support a full or flat 20Hz to 20kHz frequency response... so guitar amps CHANGE the sound of my patches).  So yes every pickup sounds a little different, but not majorly different.  STRINGS: A new set of strings will sound brighter (more treble); An old set of strings will sound dull (less treble).  WOOD BEHAVIOR (The type of wood a guitar is made from): My Steinberger neck and body is 1 solid piece of graphite composite (not wood): The type of material a guitar is made out of will also affect its sound; But it is usually a minor sound adjustment; Usually not enough of a sound change to make a person unhappy with my BOSS GT-10 patches; None that I have heard yet.  The MAJOR changes in sound have to do with what pickup setting you are using (lead/bridge, middle, rhythm/neck pickup and in single or dual-coil mode/s), your picking-location (next to the bridge saddle, over the lead/bridge pickup, over the neck, etc.), how hard/soft you are picking [You'll get more treble picking harder I've noticed].  WAH WAH EFFECT: When copying the wah wah effect I try to find a section in the song where it is closed and where it is open and I copy both sounds by ear and by what the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer says: Check out my Brad Paisley, Ticks, Wah Wah Effect and Metallica, Enter Sandman Solo patches I made for the BOSS GT-10 here: http://www.jameslimborg.com/boss-gt-10-patches-download.html ; Both of those patches I copied the wah wah effect using my ear and the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer [I can see what frequencies are pushed way up and way down using the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer.  And then I have to use the Graphic/Parametric EQ's in the BOSS GT-10 to make the wah wah effect move the frequencies in the same way... or as close as I can get with the BOSS GT-10].  COPYING GUITAR SOUNDS: Some people don't care about copying sounds, some people want to copy a guitar sound 100% identical (I am one of these people), and some people are in-between... they are happy with something close but not perfect.  The only way to perfection (to copy guitar sounds perfectly) is using a guitar multi-effects processor that has full dynamic range (useful when copying Jazz/Classical guitar sounds) as well as full-compression abilities (useful for clean and most other sounds), and do NOT use a guitar amp (because every guitar amp sounds totally different due to not having a FLAT frequency response and instead having a unique frequency pattern and only supporting frequencies from about 150Hz to 5,000Hz so you don't get to hear the low-bass frequencies from 20Hz to 100Hz or the high-treble frequencies from 7,000Hz to 20,000Hz) and instead use an amp/speaker system that supports a full and flat 20Hz to 20kHz frequency response like some powered studio monitors, PA speakers, keyboard amp (or two keyboard amps placing them 10' apart for a full stereo effect), high quality home stereo system or computer audio system, or headphones; In addition having a 64-band (even better a 128-band) Graphic EQ and a Parametric EQ that lets you change as many individual frequencies as you want; In addition to letting a person use all of these effects at the same time: two different stereo delays, two different reverb effects (one tight reverb to simulate the room sound the guitarist was in during the recording of his guitar sound, one long reverb to simulate the reverb hall effect that may have been added to the sound as well), Eventide Harmonizer effect, phaser, flanger, chorus, pitch shifter, and all the other effects that exist.



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by jameslimborg on 2012-06-14 16:36:58

Hi spikey, Yes my BOSS GT-10 patches are expensive if you only buy 1; However they are a great deal if you buy all of them.  It takes me 4 to 30+ hours (1 to 3 days) to make 1 patch; My prices are high because they take so long to make.  I also invest 15% of what I make selling BOSS GT-10 Patches into advertising; Most recently I have been spending $4 to $5 a day on advertising my BOSS GT-10 Patches; PayPal takes around 5% as well I think.



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by hansvaneven on 2012-06-14 22:36:10

I think your patches sound very good James, and I know from experience that this takes time, for when a verion for HD500 ?

Wish the HD500 had some REAL EQ section instead of the current ones, where you need to check this website http://foobazaar.com/podhd/toneGuide/eq#effects-mid to see which freqs you are using, witrh a decent EQ section the HD500 would value x2 for me ...

cheers,

Hans

www.youtube.com/hansvaneven



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by mazuwa on 2012-06-15 04:33:33

Yes, the patches sound very close to the original and are impressive.

A GT-10 has got a 10 band eq, but to transfer to your HD500 you must compromise because of different eq strategy. Furthermore it is very difficult and a lot of manual work.

I know the new firmware of the axe fx-2 has got a tool like this.

My purpose: If it is not possible to integrate a tool like this for the HD500 firmware, it should be possible to integrate it into HD EDIT.

The editor may analyse a .wav / .aif - file sound example, and tell us how to set the given eq faders of all used eq blocks (combined, considered as a whole!) behind the amp to get as close as possible!!!!!!!!



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by Akeron on 2012-06-15 08:31:56

Just in case anyone was interested, I've found (but haven't really used yet) some free 128 band spectrum analyzer apps:

http://www.concretefx.com/DownloadFree.htm">http://www.concretefx.com/DownloadFree.htm">http://www.concretefx.com/DownloadFree.htm (Spec)

http://www.tobias-erichsen.de/graphicalAnalyzer.html">http://www.tobias-erichsen.de/graphicalAnalyzer.html">http://www.tobias-erichsen.de/graphicalAnalyzer.html



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by jameslimborg on 2012-06-15 21:17:47

Hi hansvaneven, Thanks, I worked very hard to copy those guitar sounds on my website http://www.jameslimborg.com/boss-gt-10-patches-download.html .  I can copy guitar sounds best if I have just the guitar sound (without any other instruments playing: drums, keyboards, bass guitar, vocals, other guitars, etc.); Then when I use the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer it is only showing me what that guitar sound is doing [Not what the drums, bass guitar, vocals, etc. are all doing).  I want to start over with my Van Halen Unchained and Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love patches because when I made those patches I didn't have just the guitar track; now I do; So someday I will be updating those two Van Halen songs for sure (and maybe some others; to make them sound even better).  I could literally spend a week on each patch trying to get them as best as I can, but I don't have the time or energy to do that; So I try to do the best I can in 1 to 3 days (4 to 30+ hours).  Regarding EQ-ing in the Line 6 POD HD 500/1000/PRO (or other Manufacturers products), I hope someday all companies have a real nice EQ-ing system; I'd like an EQ section that has TABS along the top (The first TAB could be an 8-band Graphic EQ, second TAB could be a 16-band, then a 32-band, 64-band, 128-band); I want each band so I can adjust them up/down in volume at least 48dB (so I have plenty of control); And then I would like a Parametric EQ that lets me change as many individual frequencies as I want (or at least 32), letting me scroll from 20Hz to 20kHz 100Hz at a time, letting me adjust each frequency volume +/- 48dB.



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by hansvaneven on 2012-06-15 22:55:06

Hi James, at least you're not allone thinking the EQ's on most guitar product are real pitas, I think they should all include at least a good 6-8 band fullly parametric EQ, but probably a 32 band graphic EQ would be nice too, anyway, keep up the good work ;)

Hans



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by jameslimborg on 2012-06-15 22:57:32

Akeron, Here is how to test those spectrum analyzers to see if they are as good as the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer that I use:

But I can tell you how to test a spectrum analyzer to see if it is as good as the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer that I use; Watch my video below; Specifically watch my Van Halen Eruption audio sample in the video below; Now notice after the first chord (which is A) and the next note that I slide up to... the next 2 notes notice how they pop up on the spectrum analyzer at 187Hz and 208Hz [That is the kind of detail I need to see]; Now, go to my website here: http://www.jameslimborg.com/boss-gt-10-patches-download.html and download ALL of my audio samples [There is a link on my website that allows you to download all of my audio samples in one .zip file]; Now listen to my Van Halen Eruption audio sample through any spectrum analyzer you want and see if it also kicks up at 187Hz and 208Hz like the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer does in my video for my Van Halen Eruption audio sample; I have not found any spectrum analyzers that do. Now in addition to that... I also need each frequency band to have 3-groups of lights (green on the bottom, yellow in the middle, red at the top); And I need each of those groups of lights to have individual lights so I can see exactly how far each frequency goes into the green, yellow, red areas! That is very important; A lot of spectrum analyzers I have found on the internet fade from one color into the next making it very difficult for me to see exactly how high each frequency is going in volume. Another important feature with the Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer is that it has 64-individual frequency bands (rather than just 16 or 32) and it displays each of the 64 individual frequencies along the bottom in yellow from 20Hz all the way up to 20kHz; Some spectrum analyzers don't even show you the frequency numbers along the bottom (making it impossible to know what frequency is doing what). I have talked with Sonic Core (who use to be Creamware) and they said they could make a 64-band spectrum analyzer (as a plugin for music recording software) as good or better than their old Creamware 64-band spectrum analyzer because they have high-resolution technology these days; But before they spend a year or so creating such a device they have to find a way people cannot steal their software; They don't want to spend a year or so making a new 64-band spectrum analyzer and have people steal it and post it on the internet for free; which is what happens to a lot of software; So, This could mean that Sonic Core will never get around to making a new 64-band spectrum analyzer.



Re: POD HD 500 - Spectrum Analyzer for making patches
by jameslimborg on 2012-06-16 00:16:16

Thanks hansvaneven, you too.




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