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Is it worth getting AES/EBU cable for L6 link or will XLR be good enough?
by edstar1960 on 2012-06-22 04:52:15

Just got a DT25 combo and want to try it with my HD500 and JTV59 - the doc just says to use XLR for the L6 Link control but the Line 6 video tutorial and other members on the forum say use AES/EBU cable as its better quality.

I just wanted to check what the views/opinions were from everyone who have tried both.  Does the AES/EBU cable provide significantly better sound quality or is it just a subtle improvement over using a standard but good quality XLR lead?

Thanks.



Re: Is it worth getting AES/EBU cable for L6 link or will XLR be good enough?
by Crusty_Old_Rocker on 2012-06-22 04:54:32

You just need to use XLR cables.

You won't get any improvement in "sound quality" when it comes to AES/EBU as its ones and zeros travelling in that format.

I have chained 4 DT amps using XLR without any problems.

Cheers,

Crusty



Re: Is it worth getting AES/EBU cable for L6 link or will XLR be good enough?
by edstar1960 on 2012-06-22 08:00:44

Thanks Crusty.  Of course the cable is just used for digital info to sync the HD500 and the amp and also to change the topology.  I should not have used "sound quality" to describe it. I think I used that phrase because I had just watched the Line6 Video tutorial for HD500 to DT25/50 connectivity and in that video the voice over states "for best audio results please consider using AES/EBU XLR cable".  I think what they were trying to say was for best and most reliable data communication via the cable, please consider using an AES/EBU XLR cable rather than a cheap crackly mic cable. That's my paraphrasing of course.

Good to know that XLR's will do the job fine - saves me spending another £20 or so on a new AES/EBU XLR cable that I don't really need.  Thanks!  



Re: Is it worth getting AES/EBU cable for L6 link or will XLR be good enough?
by spaceatl on 2012-06-22 08:36:06

I agree with Crusty. For most folks a good quality mic cable is fine...

I see two cases where an AES/EBU is a good idea...

1. you are 50 feet away from your amp...

2. you like the idea of having better shielding and higher termination impedance and you might use your link cables on analog mics or analog interconnects when you are not using your DT50...



Re: Is it worth getting AES/EBU cable for L6 link or will XLR be good enough?
by bartpuglise on 2012-06-22 08:48:45

I had a Mogami XLR mic cable that was not defective but I noticed a faint "feedback type whirr" when not playing. I thought it was a particular patch but it was always present nomatter what patch I used. I purchased a AES/EBU cable for $30.00 at guitar center and the "whirr" disappeared. I still use the Mogami cable for my mic. So I know other guys have had no problems with Mic cables and maybe my situation is an isolated incident but Line6 does spec out a AES/EBU (DMX) cable. Just adding my 2 cents. Rock on!!!!!



Re: Is it worth getting AES/EBU cable for L6 link or will XLR be good enough?
by edstar1960 on 2012-06-25 10:13:37

Actually I was wrong yet again - DOH - having read the L6 LINK CONNECTIVITY GUIDE it clearly says CONTROL and DIGITAL AUDIO information flows through the L6 LINK CABLE - so as long as the digital info ends up being received without losing any bits on the way then the quality should be the same but if you have an inferior cable then I guess you could lose some 0's or 1's and therefore notice an inferior sound quality or have the sound cut out or similar.  Guess the AES/EBU cable guarantees better data transmission ensuring no surprises.  I will try with a good quality XLR first but if I notice any hiccups I will go for the AES/EBU cable.

Thanks everyone for their input.



Re: Is it worth getting AES/EBU cable for L6 link or will XLR be good enough?
by TheRealZap on 2012-06-25 10:44:31

in fact line6 even makes a L6LINK cable now, you can get at sweetwater...

i've had good luck with my standard mic cables... but changing out one because of a little noise is easy enough, and i know others haven't always been so lucky.



Re: Is it worth getting AES/EBU cable for L6 link or will XLR be good enough?
by dagnabbit on 2012-07-05 16:22:29

If you're into building cables, try building a cable for the L6 Link using CAT5e ot CAT6 Ethernet cable.  An AES cable is transporting a digital signal, and CAT5e specs fall within AES standards.  I think the spec is 656 feet (200 meters) limit for asychronized signals and 1312 feet (400 meters) limit for synced signals.  I don;t know what the L6Link spec is, I imagine it's async (since there's two different types of data being transported).  There's a paper written at the AES site (but they make you pay $20 for it) at http://www.aes.org/e-lib/browse.cfm?elib=10275, but it basically comes down to:  good quality twisted pair data cables work well for AES/EBU use (L6Link, DMX lighting/effects control, etc).

I guess it's easy enough to go buy a L6 Link cable- you really can;t go wrong there, unless you need a longer length of cable (I do on some gigs).  Building your own with CAT5e cable would let you build much longer cables than anyone has in stock, and a LOT cheaper.

I'll post the pinouts/connections as soon as I get home.

In fact, I'm thinking of wiring up XLR-to-RJ45 adapters that will let me use regular Ethernet network cables- If I keep two or three of different lengths in my gig bag, then I'm prepared for just about any situation and I'll only have to create two XLR adapters (one male, one female).



Re: Is it worth getting AES/EBU cable for L6 link or will XLR be good enough?
by spaceatl on 2012-07-05 18:57:50

110 Ohms termination resistance...CAT5 is normally 100 Ohms...pretty close, but you might need a termination resistor and a shield to make it proper...



Re: Is it worth getting AES/EBU cable for L6 link or will XLR be good enough?
by JazzTubaist on 2012-11-02 18:20:48

Crusty_Old_Rocker: You won't get any improvement in "sound quality" when it comes to AES/EBU as its ones and zeros travelling in that format.

WELL Crusty - theorethically you are right - but in the real world, things seldom are that simple!

My father and I are both tuba players, double-bass players and Hi-Fi-enthusiast - and have (along with other enthusiasts) been experimenting A LOT with different cables both for our instruments and for our HI-FI-equipment. Changing the cable only can be like suddently playing a total different bass, changing the sound from being mediocre, to sounding like a world class bass - and the only thing happened was a change of cable.

The "its just ones and zeroes" argument equals the comments and respons we hear from electricians, when telling them we experiment and test the power-cords for our equipment too. They look at us in dissbelief, nod their heads, and explains us that it is impossible that changing the power cord should have ANY influence on the sound what so ever (it's just 230v./50Hzt power no where near the signal source, they say).
Yet - some month ago we tested the power cords replacing the "normal" power-cords with some in the 2-300$ area (yeah you did read right ;-) - and in a blind-test we independedly heard and described the excact same things happening: Just by replacing the power-cords the clearnes and the perspective in the music opened up drastically and e.g. in this recording: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qr_TpjfbZZ4
the bassoon suddently changes from "sitting somewhere in the ensemble" to be located a certain spot in the sound-picture 1½ meter in front of the speakers!

(the bassoon is hardly hearable on this youtube-version, but it doubles (playes unison with) the double-bass)

We are not even talking signal-cables here - merely the power-cords leading the power from the wall-outlet to the Hi-Fi-Equipment - so Crusty (and others ;-)) - be carefull before telling people the cables doesn't matter! :-)

The last thing to mention is that higher prize not ALLWAYS equals better sound - it often does, but a couple of 100$ cables sometimes beats a couple of 400$ cables by knock out. ;-) And sometimes it depends on what you are after. The EAS/EBU cables supports the high frequencies better its said, so the overtones defining the body-sounds of different instruments are better supported, and should give a clearer, well defined and more open sound - but if you are more to a heavy bassy and volumeous sound - maybe they are not the right choice.

You simply has to compare them and choose the ones sounding better.
(Ask your supplyer for permission to "try them out" - and try away!) :-D




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