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Electric guitar EQ
by anouchirvan on 2012-11-30 05:19:27

Hi

I use POD Farm2 with my Line 6 USB UX2 interface. I like the FX but whatever FX I put on the Electric Guitar, I have a problem to have lower strings as well as higher strings sound good simultaneousely.

That is, when I tweak the sound/FX to have a good sound on bass strings (say 3rd to 6th strings), then the lower 1st and 2nd strings sound too high, too metallic or crystaline.

On the other hand, when I make it to have a good sound on 1st and 2nd strings, the bass strings sound too boomy.

This worsens when I add some distortion; that is the 1st and 2nd strings' sound are so ear-penetrating that I have to lower the volume!

Can any EQ settings and/or other tricks get around this problem ?



Re: Electric guitar EQ
by hulbert on 2012-12-01 02:57:46

Hi,

   Here's the eq setting I set for all my electric guitars - in the  4 band EQ in pod farm I use -   -4.7db at 50hz, 9.5db at 100hz, -3.8db at 550hz and -5.6db at 9.0khz

I keep that on that and then adjust the amp etc.

This might not suit your personal choice, but I settled on that after trying to get overdriven/distorted amps to sound better. I wanted to get rid of the 'fizzy' sound.

God bless,

David



Re: Electric guitar EQ
by anouchirvan on 2012-12-02 22:54:32

Thank you very much David.

I'll try your settings and see.

In the mean time, someone told me to look into the distance between the pickups and the strings and actually after looking closely I had to lower the pickups a bit because they were too close to the lower strings.

I have yet to get used to this new sound; the effect is like taking some dB to hight frequencies.



Re: Electric guitar EQ
by hulbert on 2012-12-03 06:20:46

Yeah, I hadn't thought of that. I used to have same problem. I used to get booming bass strings and I'm not sure if I changed my amp's tone to stop it but I later changed my pickup height and I think I got it solved. This guitar has humbuckers in the bridge position and single coil pickups in mid and neck positions, so I put my humbucker up closer to the strings (sloping down to bass side) and my single coils lower - neck lower than mid so that fretted strings when played at 20th (or 21st - can't rmember how many it has) won't hit the neck pickup poles.

I tried really lowering the pickups on another guitar and I know what you mean . It really gives you a different sound and volume, and feels quite different. Having it lower allows more vibration and 'instrument' sound (that's not really totally true I suppose but I just mean more 'vibration', and having them up close makes the magnets 'pull' on the strings and so the sustain of notes is reduced because the strings are being stopped from vibrating a bit, because the magnets in the pickups are pulling at them. I use the higher up pickup for higher gain stuff especially, where I want more db  - but it just depends on what sound each person is after. I like distortion/overdrive but I also like cleaner sounds too, so I like both types. I don't use the guitar I 'really' lowered though, as it has problems.

Have fun searching for that 'sweet spot' where it sounds right.

How many pickups do you have and are they all the same type? Maybe you could try one higher and one lower etc.

God Bless,

David



Re: Electric guitar EQ
by anouchirvan on 2012-12-03 23:18:11

I feel not easy with the idea to change the pickups positions each time to get a different sound (even though I may do it). Usually the heights is fixed once for all and the FX are here to change the tone. Maybe by changing the pickups heights you have to change all your FX presets a bit since they've been adjusted with old positions.

I have an old Gibson L6-S (dated in 70s I guess) with 2 humbuckers I guess (they are covered like in Les Paul). I like the sound (I play Jazz and rock) since I'm used to during all these years but I'd like to get out of it the sound of a fender stratocaster (specially for rhythm and for overdriven lead). I know I'd better to buy a fender (still keeping my Gibson of course) but since I'm short of money I'd like to try to get that sound by playing with FX .



Re: Electric guitar EQ
by hulbert on 2012-12-04 04:47:42

Yeah. the normal strat sound is single coil pickups, and strats are lighter guitars than Les Pauls (and I suppose the L6s ) etc. so they resonate differently, but if you were really keen, you could re-wire the humbuckers so that depending on which switch position you have it set on, it will give a full humbucker tone or a sound similar to single coil pickups. You probably wouldn't want to do this though to your good guitar though, but its an option.

Concerning pickup height, yes, it wouldn't be good to have to change height each time you wanted a different tone. Yes, I think you would have to find the best height and then change your effects settings for the new position.

God Bless,

David



Re: Electric guitar EQ
by jjRocker on 2012-12-23 08:52:41

hulbert schrieb:

Hi,

   Here's the eq setting I set for all my electric guitars - in the  4 band EQ in pod farm I use -   -4.7db at 50hz, 9.5db at 100hz, -3.8db at 550hz and -5.6db at 9.0khz

I keep that on that and then adjust the amp etc.

This might not suit your personal choice, but I settled on that after trying to get overdriven/distorted amps to sound better. I wanted to get rid of the 'fizzy' sound.

God bless,

David

Thank you for the advice ! Makes it much easier to dial in a good distortion sound




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