VARIAX SOUND SAMPLES


HD Electric Guitars


T-Model

Based on* 1960 Fender Telecaster Custom

The Fender® Telecaster® put the solidbody electric guitar on the map in 1950—revolutionizing the sound of music. Artists including Keith Richards (“Brown Sugar”), George Harrison (“Let It Be”) and Andy Summers (“Roxanne”) have favored these guitars.

Leo Fender’s Telecaster, originally known as the Broadcaster, was the first commercially successful solidbody electric guitar and has been in continuous production for over fifty years, powering the Nashville sound and a long list of rock and jazz guitar luminaries. Note: The neck pickup position of this model, like the original, has a very “deep” sound and the tone control is bypassed.

Spank

Based on* 1959 Fender Stratocaster

The hugely popular Fender Stratocaster can be heard on hits by legendary guitarists Jimi Hendrix (“Foxy Lady”), Stevie Ray Vaughan (“Pride and Joy”), Eric Clapton (“Layla”) and many others.

Considered a radical departure when introduced in 1954, the Stratocaster influenced electric guitar design more than any other single instrument—and its distinctive comfort-contoured body, bolt-on neck and versatile electronics have become industry-standard features. Our model takes one slight liberty—unlike the original instrument, the tone control works on the bridge pickup, too.

Lester

Based on* 1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard

You’ve seen and heard Les Paul guitars in the hands of many iconic guitarists including Jimmy Page (“Black Dog”), Slash (“Welcome to the Jungle”), Pete Townshend (“Baba O’Riley”) and others.

Gibson’s first solidbody electric design was a collaboration with popular guitarist and recording pioneer Les Paul. Unlike the easy-to-manufacture Fender® designs, the Les Paul retains the carved top and set neck construction of their hollowbody models. The original series was a commercial failure and discontinued in 1961, but a resurgence of popular interest led to its reintroduction in 1968.

Special

Based on* 1955 Gibson Les Paul Special

With its aggressive punchiness and woody character, the Les Paul Special is a favorite of Bob Marley (“Buffalo Soldier”), Billy Joe Armstrong (“American Idiot”) and Paul Westerberg (“Kiss Me On The Bus”).

The Special was added to the Les Paul line in 1955 as an intermediate step between the utilitarian Junior and more luxurious Standard. A second P-90 provided greater tonal options—and helped make the Special a favorite of reggae legend Bob Marley. Our model is based on the original single-cutaway version.

R-Billy

Based on* 1959 Gretsch® 6120

With a distinctive look that often incorporated an iconic “G” branded on the front and bright colors, the hollow design of the Gretsch 6120 made it crunch and project for Brian Setzer (“Stray Cat Strut”), twang for Duane Eddy (“Peter Gunn” theme) and spank for Eddie Cochran (“Summertime Blues”).

The 6120 was the first of several models that Gretsch developed with country guitar whiz Chet Atkins, and is usually associated with the “twangy” sounds of players like Duane Eddy, Eddie Cochran and Brian Setzer. Our model is equipped with Filter’tron™ hum-canceling pickups.

R-Billy

Based on* 1956 Gretsch Duo Jet

With a distinctive look that often incorporated an iconic “G” branded on the front and bright colors, the hollow design of the Gretsch 6120 made it crunch and project for Brian Setzer (“Stray Cat Strut”), twang for Duane Eddy (“Peter Gunn” theme) and spank for Eddie Cochran (“Summertime Blues”).

Gretsch introduced this series in 1955. Though called a solidbody by Gretsch, the Jet series actually has internal hollow chambers that contribute to its light weight and resonant tone. It was the favorite instrument of Cliff Gallup, original lead guitarist for Gene Vincent’s Blue Caps. The guitar we modeled had DeArmond® pickups and a Melita bridge.

Chime

Based on* 1966 Rickenbacker® 370

Often sought after by players that seek to blend vintage and modern sounds, Rickenbacker guitars helped shape some of the most iconic tracks of the last 100 years, played by Tom Petty (“Refugee”), John Lennon (“Help”), and Peter Buck (“Orange Crush”).

Though overshadowed by the success of the 12-string, the 6-string versions of Rickenbacker’s stylish models continue to be popular with players looking for something a bit extraordinary, like Ed O’Brien of Radiohead.

Chime

Based on* 1966 Rickenbacker® 370-12

Often sought after by players that seek to blend vintage and modern sounds, Rickenbacker guitars helped shape some of the most iconic tracks of the last 100 years, played by Tom Petty (“Refugee”), John Lennon (“Help”), and Peter Buck (“Orange Crush”).

Popularized by George Harrison in The Beatles and Roger McGuinn in the Byrds, the distinctive jangle of the 12-string Rickenbacker was a significant part of the ‘60s rock sound. Our model has the original Toaster® pickups.

Semi

Based on* 1961 Gibson® ES®-335

The semi-hollow sound is iconic, and can easily move from rock with Alvin Lee (“Good Morning Little Schoolgirl”) to studio pop jazz with Larry Carlton (“Kid Gloves”), and to sweet pop with Justin Hayward (“Tuesday Afternoon”).

The semi-hollow Gibson blends the tone and sustain of a solidbody with the balance and aesthetics of a hollowbody. The “woody” tone of these guitars made them popular with jazz artists like Larry Carlton and blues greats like B. B. and Albert King. Our model is based on a 1961 dot neck, with PAFs and a stop tailpiece.

Jazzbox

Based on* 1953 Gibson® Super 400

The first jazz guitars were originally known as “electric Spanish” instruments, as they were some of the first traditionally-played guitars to have electric pickups. Guitarists like Jim Hall (“Dream Gypsy”), Charlie Christian (“Stompin’ At The Savoy”), and Pat Metheny (“Travels”) have all made jazz guitars the root of their signature tones.

By the end of the 1940s, changing musical styles found premium archtops like the Super 400 to be lacking in volume. By simply adding the pickups and controls developed for its early electric guitars, Gibson created the electric version of the Super 400 in 1951. Our model is based on the version with P-90s. Check out Scotty Moore (and Elvis) playing a Super 400 in the ’68 Comeback Special.

Jazzbox

Based on* 1954 Gibson® ES®-175

The first jazz guitars were originally known as “electric Spanish” instruments, as they were some of the first traditionally-played guitars to have electric pickups. Guitarists like Jim Hall (“Dream Gypsy”), Charlie Christian (“Stompin’ At The Savoy”), and Pat Metheny (“Travels”) have all made jazz guitars the root of their signature tones.

Gibson added a sharp “Venetian” cutaway and a fancier fingerboard to the budget ES-125 model to create the ES-175. With the addition of a second P-90 pickup in 1953, this quickly became a popular and enduring choice for jazz guitarists.

VARIAX SOUND SAMPLES


HD Acoustic and Eclectic Guitars


Acoustic

Based on* 1959 Martin® D-28

The D-28 is generally considered the definitive Martin flat-top. The Dreadnought (or “D”) body combined with rosewood back and sides produces a full sound ideal for flatpicking.

Acoustic

Based on* 1967 Martin® O-18

The smaller “parlor” sized body with mahogany back and sides has a balanced tone ideal for finger-style playing.

Acoustic

Based on* 1966 Guild® F212

Guild’s jumbo-bodied 12-strings offered players the elusive combination of volume and clarity. We’ve modeled the F212 with mahogany back and rims.

Acoustic

Based on* 1995 Gibson® J-200

Easily identified by its impressive size and ornamentation, the J-200 was often played by flashy country and western artists, and was a later favorite of Elvis Presley.

Reso

Inspired by* the Coral Sitar®

The Coral Sitar® offered guitarists the ability to get the buzz and drone of a sitar without having to learn a new instrument. On this model, the tone control changes the level of the drone strings.

Reso

Inspired by* the Gibson® Mastertone Banjo

The Mastertone series was introduced in 1925 and quickly became the definitive Bluegrass banjo.

Reso

Based on* 1928 National® Tricone

The Tricone uses three 6-inch cones mechanically coupled to the bridge to amplify string vibrations. The Tricone has a smoother sound than later, singlecone resonators.