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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/05/2022 in Posts

  1. I find the ongoing discussion more laughable as the years go on. I can't tell you how many times I've listened to a guitar player talk about how he won't use any digital crap, nothing but a trusty pedal board into a tube amp. When I look at their board it often has 2 or 3 Strymon's on it. I love breaking the news to them :) It certainly took mixing & mastering engineers many years to come to grip with the change. The transition was painful but (IMO) once people caught up to the technology I find I do prefer a "well produced/engineered" DDD recording. Yes... yes... yes! The technology is fine, it's the abuse of the technology that is to blame. Guitar players are not immune to this.... for some reason guitar players intuitively know that they can't turn every effect on their monster pedal board on at the same time, yet with a modeler many lose all control then often claim modelling doesn't sound good.
    2 points
  2. Hi, If you know the dimensions of the washer - overall diameter, hole diameter and thickness, plus the material (steel, nylon) then you should be able to pick up replacements from any hardware supplier. Fleabay and Amazon have bulk packs, so you never need run out. Hope this helps/makes sense.
    1 point
  3. One of the models in the Dynamics section is called Autoswell. I would start with that.
    1 point
  4. Back in the 80s/90s when CDs first came around, we had similar discussions (and then again when MP3 came around). As far as CDs go, I always found AAD to sound better than DDD. And today's bland mainstream music, I don't blame the digital. I blame all of the uber processed recordings - every auto-tuned note synchronized to a computerized timing clock. All while compressors/limiters make the volume for each note exactly the same. No amount of - "let's put it on vinyl" will make it sound any better. So, while not completely related, it is not unrelated to your question. You just have to look at all the factors, not just one. Because they all have a role in the final output. Even the L6 stuff, some people say they get better tone using it with a tube amp (but then they go and record on a computer). So, in that instance, it is the last stage of tone that brings out the 'warmth' for them. Change the speaker to get a little 'extra'. Everything else is that same bland digital that they hate, but the tube amp they like. How do they capture the tube amp warmth on a computerized recorder, is anyone's guess. Using myself as an example, I never used a tube amp. Once I 'completed' building my [previous/old] rig, it was all microchips. Nothing like today's digital experiences, but certainly not analog. But no one ever told me I was too digital/processed. No one ever told me my tone was lacking. They either liked what they heard or they didn't. *specifically a Peavey Bandit 65, two ART SGE Mach II, and a Rocktron Pro GAP (the black and red model).
    1 point
  5. I'm not sure what you're asking. To call a Snapshot from Stomp Mode, in CommandCenter you assign the Snapshot to a FS.
    1 point
  6. Success! I'm happy to report that my Line 6 'Won't Go' is now a Pod Go again!!! :) Support suggested I load the firmware offline from a Flash file that is available from the same location as all the other stuff; firmware, updater, edit etc. So I downloaded the flash file and tried loading it using updater and in update mode (power on whilst holding down page> (right) on the Pod Go) At first the same thing happened - it started to load but then crashed. I changed to a different PC (which didn't work yesterday whilst online) and it worked straight away in offline mode! Happy days. NOTE: If you are logged in to your account, updater doesn't mention 'offline mode' but you need to choose the 'local file' option at the start/top of the list - you then locate the downloaded flash file on your computer - it's a .hxf file - in my case it was in my downloads folder. If you are not logged in to your account, updater gives you the option to work offline. Since then, I have done a factory restore (hold down C & D buttons and turn on) which means I can see all the new stuff in v1.3, and I have loaded my backup with my user patches in tact, plus some IR's that I purchased awhile ago. Everything working and sounding great. Faith restored Thanks for all your help with this - it wasn't much fun, but I got there in the end!!
    1 point
  7. I'd like to add that on the Helix manual at p. 44 under "Tips for Creative Controller Assignment" it says: "To smoothly blend between the tone on parallel paths A and B, select a Split > A/B block and assign the Route To parameter to an expression pedal. By default, a heel-down position means the signal passes fully through Path A. Moving the pedal toward the toe-down position will gradually crossfade into Path B. Alternatively, assign a footswitch to control the Route To parameter, for instantly switching back and forth" "gadually crossfade" is wrong and actually it would be cool if it was a crossfader (but they can not change it in a fw update, because that would ruin many user presets) what they could do is actually add a crossfader parameter in the merge mixer block but of course we could do that by assigning level A and level B, or two gain blocks each on his path, to the same expression pedal with opposite min and max values: this also avoids the problem of sending different levels from the split to gain-related fx and amps on the two paths, because we are controlling the levels after the fx ...the potential problem I see with the use of mixer levels is that -60dB, which is the minimum value for the levels in the mixer block, is not exactly silence (by the way, why didn't they go with -120dB like in the gain block?!?) I say "potential" because the interference of a signal -60dB lower than another totally depends on the kind of sounds at stake i.e.: it coul totally be ok for two clean or two distorted sounds but maybe not for a clean vs a distorted sound
    1 point
  8. I don't fit the profile you were looking for of using an acoustic guitar solely for singer-songwriter events as I play mine in an electric rock band but I have used an acoustic with the Helix for a few songs at every gig for a couple of years now. Nonetheless, some of this may be relevant to the solo singer-songwriter scenario and it took me a couple of years of tweaking acoustic presets to come around to this current opinion(it might be different again in a couple of years, ha :-)). When I started dialing up patches for acoustic guitar for quite a while I used the tube pre, cabs, and various amp or preamp blocks such as the Jazz Rivet that I thought might be ok with an acoustic guitar, experimented with 3Sigma acoustic IRs, etc.. Although I got some good sounds that way and used those acoustic presets for quite a while I ultimately found that I preferred acoustic guitar presets with no amp, cab, or IR blocks. My recommendation for general use is to just dial up a patch with a compressor set gently, boost, gain block, a few delay, reverb, and chorus options, and various EQ blocks for molding the tone and dialing out piezo quack(if you have a piezo pickup). I find the Helix choruses have such different characters it is nice to have a couple to choose from in my acoustic presets. You can also use a second compressor like the 'LA Studio Comp' or Multi-Band at the end of your signal chain set gently so you don't destroy your dynamics. Acoustic guitars are particularly sensitive to their dynamics being crushed by excessive compression unless you are intentionally going for that sound. The only specific instructions I have for the Multi-Band is to put it at the end of your signal chain where it can act to some extent like a mastering compressor. One of the delay blocks I include in my chain is the 'Ducked Delay' to decrease the busyness during finger picked or fast strummed passages but it still adds a nice delay to the tail. I find matching the delay to the tempo and reverb to the size and type space I am in is generally helpful and sounds more realistic as you would expect. I use a couple of different delay blocks; same for the reverb. I use a compressor near the front of my signal chain. If you are using one of the compressors with attack and release times I set the 'Attack' low, e.g. 25ms; I tend to set the 'Release' parameter at 300ms or greater depending on the song's tempo. The higher release times can work well with an acoustic guitar but experiment and make sure you are not holding the compression too long on faster tunes and failing to compress subsequent peaks. You can also experiment with dialing down the 'Mix' parameter on the compressor to allow more of the initial unaffected sound through. I run my "Mix" at about 90%. Some other specific blocks I put in my preset although they are not necessarily switched on at any given time are the 'Ubiquitous Vibe; 'Trinity Chorus' (sounds great with acoustic), and the 'Kinky Boost' . Proper use of the combination of compressor, boost, and EQ blocks should get you the additional "saturation" you are looking for. I then throw in any effect in I think I might use with my acoustic. It is amazing how much you can throw into a single preset when you don't require multiple amp or IR blocks. You may want to include an acoustic IR that you can switch in now and then to change the character of your specific acoustic guitar but I generally found that I preferred my tone without it. I always have a gain or boost block set up on a footswitch for boosting leads. As many have said before, often less is more when it comes to acoustic. It is easy to overwhelm the sound of a great acoustic guitar with too much processing and it is important to let the "room" inform your block setting choices. The above is just what I found worked best for me when using an acoustic guitar with piezos via the Helix out to an FRFR stage monitor and FOH. Those using an electric guitar with piezos or Variax or other types of monitoring may want to take a different approach.
    1 point
  9. @PeterHamm is getting great tones, look at his preset configurations for ideas. Other ideas: - don't use any amps or cabinets on your guitar signal - the studio preamp is useful as your 1st block - use a 3Sigma acoustic guitar IR to get a little more wood in your tone - get your basic acoustic git tone perfected before adding any effects - add effects as needed (eg reverb, chorus, delay, etc) - the Timmy distortion works nice on acoustic guitar if needed for leads, etc - create a separate (and similar, but no IR) path for your vocal mic - you can use a small MIDI controller/mixer that has USB MIDI-out to control your mix without stooping down (for example, a Korg nanokontrol)
    1 point
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