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Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/28/2022 in Posts

  1. In your 3CM setup... set the HX Effects IN/OUT to Line Level. Now you can stop guessing about the configuration... it's matched regardless of how you set your amps loop. I'd usually set the amp loop to +4, but since you are encountering "possible" clipping, set it to -10, at least for testing. Start with a blank HX Effects patch. I don't mean turn off the effects, I mean nothing in it, not even a noise gate. If there is no clipping sound on the blank patch... slowly add one effect at a time to see where the problem begins. If the "clipping sound" is there already... then there are only a few possibilities. Try engaging true bypass mode on the HX Effects (it's in the manual) to see if it goes away. If it does, you may have a faulty HX Effects. If the problem continues in true bypass mode, the fault is likely in a cable or within the loop of the AC30. Test the loop of the AC30 by inserting a small patch cable between the send/return Don't assume your cables to the HX effects are good. Properly test each one of them. If you follow those steps, it will pinpoint the exact spot the problem arises and will take any guessing out of the equation.
    4 points
  2. In all honestly, the yellow led thing is a bit of snake oil, even because yellow/red are very transient sensitive, like any headroom range in a non linear dB scale. It's just a meter measuring input before the amp stage. Also, the original version of the manual says the yellow/amber does indicates that level is close to the hardware limit (which is true). Then people started complaining about PCs being weak, and then they added the "yellow = most realistic non-linear natural breakup characteristics", to invite users to push their preset at the output. Amber just indicate you are close to the limit of the available headroom at the converters, but doesnt mean "best tone", or speaker breakup zone. You can get amber zone, even with PCabs at volume zero, so hundred miles away from breakup. Also, good luck staying in the yellow with clean tones without injecting noise for no reason, and risking transients blowing up the speakers at higher volumes..:) From green to yellow, is all good. For compressed signals, you can stay more on the yellow, for cleans and non-guitar signals better to stay on the green. Again, just do good preset leveling, and you are good, without staring at the powercab led (also on top of the cab, so bloody annoying to control) 100% imho.
    3 points
  3. Things are very slow at work today, so I was really enjoying what looked like a potential flame war heating up between two of the most helpful posters on this forum. I gotta say, I'm horribly disapointed with the way it just kind of fizzled out. I expected better. I see murder threats on Facebook between people for far less.
    3 points
  4. Blaches? Gain staging is a necessity whether you're using a Helix to FOH or an analog pedal board and a Marshall stack with a microphone. Take any of the sample presets (or one of your own). Highlight the Output Block. Play as hard as you ever play with all gain blocks active. Turn up your Channel Volume (or the last Gain block) until the Output Block hits the red, then back off until it stays green. You now have the optimum output level for the preset. But will it sound good? Not necessarily. Gain staging means making sure that each block's output does not overload the next block UNLESS that's the effect that you're going for. When you get to the end of the signal chain repeat the above output block procedure. You now have a properly gain staged preset with the optimum output level. If the FOH person says "Your signal is too hot! Turn it DOWN!" they're probably the bartender multitasking as sound tech. They have an Input Gain control on the board and usually a PAD switch. If they don't know how to use their board, then to get through the gig you may have to assign the BIG KNOB to the output you're sending to FOH (that should usually be assigned elsewhere so that FOH gets a consistent signal) and use the BIG KNOB to compensate for the house's crappy board or the incompetence of the "sound tech". That whole thing about the overall level needing to equal the level of an empty preset is BS in theory and BS in practice.
    3 points
  5. It's so strange to me when people say "the Helix is now 7-years old so of course it doesn't sound as good as __". It's a computer running some software. I am a software engineer and I sure don't judge how well my software runs based on the pc that I wrote it with. The helix is really only as old as it's last software update, right? Am I missing something?
    3 points
  6. Why would it be disappointing? These are user forums. Users helping users. You have direct access to LINE 6 through the TICKET SYSTEM which is much easier for them to keep track of. Log into your account and open a support ticket. This was a recent WINDOWS UPDATE that started this mess, not a Line 6 update. Microsoft changed the rules, and now developers are playing catch up yet again. At least this time Microsoft provided the ability to TURN OFF their new feature for the time being.
    3 points
  7. Just turn memory integrity off and be happy. I do work as GFX lead for a company for a living, and if I should worry about that microsoft bullsh** I couldnt work at all, since 70% of certified drivers I do use every day, are now flagged as not compliant with core isolation. Just turn the s**t off.
    3 points
  8. Has anybody noticed that Windows 11 just DISABLES the new feature and provides you with a notice... it's not DISABLING the driver. They know they changed the rules and are giving company's time to catch up. There is nothing to get uptight about.... it's the equivalent of a "bump ahead" sign.
    3 points
  9. Update. After spending two solid days with the FM9 and comparing it with my LT, I’ve sold the FM9. My main condition for it to retire my LT was simply that it had to sound markedly better. It did not. It did sound better “out of the box” as many have said, meaning its presets are better dialed in than Helix presets. For my uses, I use a handful of “core” amp tones from the Vox, Marshall, Fender, and T-Wreck families (and their boutique knock offs). When I compared the FM9 sounds (from the same families) to my core tones, they were neither better nor worse. Any differences could be compensated for quite easily via EQ or a modeled amp’s tone stack. Disclosure- I use my LT into the effects loop returns of my Bad Cat amps, which means I don’t use cabinet modeling or IR’s as I prefer “amp in a room” tones. Perhaps if I were comparing the full scope of modeling (amp AND speakers, mics, etc), I would have chosen otherwise, but for my needs, the Helix LT remains king because: · Tonally it’s every bit as good as the Fractal, at least the way I’m using it w/my amps · Obviously its UI is far superior · Built in expression pedal · Better price · The updates keep coming! · Snapshots are better than Scenes, IMO …and easier to set up …these are just off the top of my head, but the biggest reasons, again, are that the tone is on par, and snapshots. I will admit that the Helix reverbs can’t compete with the FM9’s cloud style reverbs, but hey- I’m not an ambient guitarist so that’s not a big one on my list…plus i have an Eventide H9 Max if i ever needed "more" out of a reverb. The Helix can still do some pretty great time-based tricks, just perhaps w/a bit less fidelity than FM9. So yeah, I’m staying put with Helix. I’m glad I got to try the FM9, but I’m even more glad that my LT is staying, because now I’m saving a ton of money as well as not having to deal with the headaches of learning a less user-friendly system. Sure, it would be nice to have 4 cores, vs the Helix's 2, but very seldom do i run in to the problem of running out of CPU. Sold the FM9 on CL at a profit (no, I didn’t gouge!) within 4 hours of listing it!
    3 points
  10. Hi, You’re not going to like this, but… RTM https://line6.com/data/6/0a020a411710a6112a67116f0b/application/pdf/HX Effects 3.0 Owner's Manual - Rev C - English .pdf Also available in French, German and Japanese. Pages 30 - 33 covers Snapshots, including, using, editing, and naming and colouring them. Here’s a walk through video: Hope this helps/makes sense.
    3 points
  11. This is complicated and may or may not be a known bug. Something similar has been reported but I don't recall the details. If Global Settings>Exp Pedals> "the Assigned pedal (1 or 2)" = Preset, the snapshot setting is NOT recalled, it defaults to the Exp Pedal Position. If Global Settings>Exp Pedals> "the Assigned pedal" (1 or 2)"= Snapshot, the snapshot setting is recalled. However, if you operate the Exp pedal, the Snapshot setting is forgotten. There may even be other conditions/behaviors that I didn't discover while playing around with this. Bottom line, if you want to control the parameters by Snapshot, assign them to Snapshots. That said, keep in mind that if you assign two parameters to an Exp pedal, when you operate the pedal it will set BOTH parameters to the Exp pedal position REGARDLESS of the saved values. IOW - the parameter settings are ABSOLUTE (linked directly to the PEDAL POSITION) not RELATIVE (linked to the SAVED VALUES). I may have ABSOLUTE and RELATIVE mixed up in terms of common usage, but hopefully you get the point.
    3 points
  12. I think the Helix sounds just as great as FM9, or Kemper. The reason people still have doubts is IMHO: 1. Past reputation of Line 6, the various Spider models, the people who tended to use those amps and the type of crappy music those people used to make with those amps. It's like Subaru Imprezza -- it's a great reliable car and actually pretty safe, however it's driven by people who are predominantly d-bags, so it gets that reputation of a d-bag car. (it also gets crashed a lot more than other cars because of the street racing, inspired by Fast and the Furious). 2. Great difficulty to get your familiar tone and feel out of the box. My setup was basically a DS-1 and a Fender amp in the analog world. I could not find a decent distortion block that would interact with my volume knob the same way as the real thing for about a week. Once I dialed in my basic sound, the rest was very easy. I now have 60 presets that I have dialed in. In reality Line 6 gear has been used on countless recording sessions and live performances. Even going back to Pod HD-500 being used by Steve Howe as far back as 2013. Good enough for him, good enough for me. From several review videos, it is evident that FM9's stuff sounds great out of the box, compared to the Helix. Their blocks just work right away the way they should. I bet you if I take a DS-1 emulation and drag it into my chain on FM9, it'll sound exactly like the real thing. On the Helix, the "Deez-1" sounded and felt absolutely nothing like the real thing: it had weird sag, it did not clean up with the volume knob, it had hiss. I've watched Steve Sterlacci's videos about Fractal vs. Helix, and Fractal's "scenes" are way more complicated to set up than what the Helix offers with snapshots, for example. But in terms of tone, multiple people said that everything just works, factory presets are great and all that. I think Line 6 can learn a thing or two from them. I love the sound options of the Helix, what worries me a little is the build quality as I've had an issue with the volume pedal, etc. But then again, I've seen people complained about the USB jack dying on their FM9. Everything is cheap Chinese printed circuit board stuff nowadays. I have my Nord Electro 2 from 2006 for example -- still works absolutely great, nothing is misfiring, all switches work just fine.
    3 points
  13. Additional ways to save DSP if you're committed to this approach: Instead of trying to cram in two amp/cab blocks try using seperate amp and cab with one cab shared between the two amps. Then, you can have the cab on the second processor with the two amps on the first processor and utilize @rd2rk's ideas about running in parallel if you like (which, FYI, I also prefer over the same path but your mileage may vary). Or, you could have one amp on the first processor and the second amp and cab on the second processor. The point is those are your most DSP intensive blocks right there so try to break the workloads up. An even better idea (IMO) might be to see if you can find an amp that can do both sounds you're trying to achieve, and use snapshots to change their parameters (i.e. adjusting drive, treble, channel volume, etc. with the push of a button). To me, this is usually where I found what I need and it saves way more DSP.
    2 points
  14. I wouldn't use two of the same block, IMO/IME it's a waste of DSP. If you're worried about losing your settings, export the preset to a backup folder. Amps use a lot of DSP. Each Path - 1A and 2A - is supported by it's own processor. The only time I use two (or even three) amps is when I'm trying to get both (or all three) channels of an amp into a single preset. I'll usually (depending on the other FX involved) put CH1 and CH2 in parallel paths with an A/B Split on PathA and the third channel with cab/IR on PathB with the time based FX (delay/reverb). The reason for putting the two amps in parallel is that leaving them ON and using the A/B Split to route the signal makes switching quieter. For some reason the noise I'm referring to doesn't happen when the third amp is on PathB. I use a regular FS to route CH1/CH2 and a Snapshot to bypass those and activate CH3. There's probably other ways, but that works for me. At any rate, the point is to split the DSP load between the two processors/paths, making more amps/FX available within the paths' DSP limitations. If you bought your Helix new then there should be a Hex Key in the box to adjust the bolt on the right side of the exp pedal.
    2 points
  15. Maybe (are you ready for this?) it's gaining weight because of too much feedback.
    2 points
  16. Of course it is! Have you ever seen an audio equipment where green flashing on a input meter means something bad? :) No led at all or most of the time, means your input it's too weak, and too close to the noise floor, so if you pump the volume on the PC to bring back some signal, you will end with lot of hiss/noise from the floor. Green means you are far enough from noise floor and far from clipping. Yellow means you are reaching the ceiling of the input stage and headroom is very narrow, red means you cross it, and the input stage is being overloaded. Powercabs are more like studio monitors than a guitar amplifier, so it's better to stay away from clipping both analog and digital sections. BTW, that "yellow led theory", never been about quality of the tone (even Sadities never really wanted to said that imho), but a matter of "perceived" volume and sound pressure available from the powercabs, when people needs more, for any reason. I would say, in a perfect scenario, with a fat and busy high gain preset (properly leveled at the amp stage and at the output), the yellow peaks would just be a natural consequence. But forcing all presets to peak in the yellow (which does represent a very narrow dB range close to the headroom ceiling), it's a plain nonsense because guitar can be either hugely dynamic signal (jazz, blues, finger picking etc...) or super normalized and compressed signal (high gain, compressors, metal rythm etc..). That wide spectrum of tones, it can't all be forced to blink the yellow. That's a laughable goal at best. 100% imho, as always.
    2 points
  17. I sure did... I've created IR's from every setting in the JD Aura and my favorites from the standard Fishman Aura. It works 100% and it saves me from carrying around extra gear. I used Voxendo Deconvolver (free version) and followed their basic instructions. Create 13 MONO Tracks in the DAW. Start by recording a 12 second sweep... Deconvolver gives you the signal, just record it in the DAW. Set the pedal so the only thing you are capturing is the effect tone... no blend, no added compression, etc... etc... Play the Sweep tone you created back into the pedal, and record it's output on a separate track NOTE: The two sweeps should be identical in start time, end time and length. They just sound different and appear on their own tracks. Repeat this process for each setting on the pedal Export the original sweep as the "ORIGINAL FILE" Export each of the other sweeps... Run those files through Deconvolver to create the IR Trim the IR to the correct length. I used SoundForge for this, but you can use Logic as well. I believe I exported the final to 48/24... but don't really remember for sure. All I know is they sound just like the pedal did.
    2 points
  18. After years of owning and using a Helix, and making all sorts of mistakes along the way, and learning from those mistakes, I'd like to share the following. This is not a "one size fits all": Be sure to have the "big dial" output volume set at at least noon. Balance the output from patch to patch by either looking at the meters on the board channels, or using a dB meter in the room (if you have more than IEMs or headphones). Use the board gain to get the signal to just begin to touch yellow. Early on, I was screwing up by having that big dial output volume set at about 9 o'clock. What that did was it cause me to set too much output in all of the individual blocks in the chain, and on the XLR outs, in order to get adequate volume out of the Helix. See, each block has its own output level and when you start jacking them all past 0 db, crap stacks up. The result can be digital "artifacts". This was not noticeable in my IEMs, or in stage monitors, but sounded really bad in the PA. It sounded like clipping, most notable on the cleaner sounds. Easy fix, but somewhat elusive. The other big screw up that I had been doing was that I was putting a limiter in front of my amp models. This practice started years ago. I found that I could use the limiter to either under drive or overdrive what was going into the amp. But really the result of doing that is that you lose the dynamics that you can get out of how hard or quietly you play the guitar. I'm pretty sure I started doing that simply because of the amp models that I selected to begin working on patches. Sure, there might be songs that require that up front compressor sound, but I'm describing how to optimize sounds that don't. A lot has changed since that time. Most of what has changed was that I've found the time to deep-dive into almost all the available amp models. Another thing that changed was Line6's introduction of better amp models. In the early days, I was just too anxious to get going. I compromised with a "close enough". Lesson learned: if the amp model doesn't sound right initially, pick a different one! Take your time, but beware of this MOST IMPORTANT POINT; the guitar going into the front end makes a *world* of difference on the back end. IMHO, this makes more difference than almost anything else. I have a Variax, so I was able to quickly try all sorts of variations. Use the right guitar and the right pups. If you can't afford this luxury, at least pick the right pup. So, back to the earliest problem, by starting with the wrong amp model, and a lot of copy and paste later, and I had a real mess. If your 'template' sucks in any way, you'll be hosed as you use it for a starting point build for the next Patch. At a crucial point, I meticulously removed the limiter from every single patch, and changed amp models, if needed. I also chose to put a compressor on the back side of the speaker sims, which is much more akin to the way that things would be done in the studio. This helps to ensure that the post signal never causes clipping on the mixer channel. I went through every patch and set all blocks to zero at their individual outputs. I set the XLR outputs to zero. I also added to every patch a 10 band graphic equalizer, post amp/speaker, and cut everything by about 7 dB from 500 Hz and lower. That's not the guitar's "space" in the mix. That eq makes things sound way better. I was also screwing up by not using the master volume of the amp model to regulate the output of each preset and its Snapshots. Instead I was using the XLR output volume, which, like anything else in the Helix, you can set per each Snapshot in a preset. Due to the aforementioned issues, some of these output volumes at the XLR out were ridiculously high. That right there can cause clipping at the mixer. I now use the amp's Channel and Master to control the overall output levels. I went through every single patch and used these improved techniques to balance the outputs to be just barely hitting yellow bars on the mixer. Only the lead breaks are allowed to go into the yellow bars solidly. So, the right pup, straight to the right amp model, to a separate cab, to an IR, to a 10-band EQ, to a compressor (usually 4:1), to delay, to a verb, to the XLR. Set all blocks outputs to zero. Use the amp Master and Channel volumes to balance Patch/Snapshots to all the other Patch/Snapshots. And a final tip; if the IR has a high cut, set it to 4K, and set the high cut on the speaker cab at 4K as well. These are my lessons learned. Maybe they'll prevent you from stumbling like the drunk I parodied?
    2 points
  19. In general a global bump isn't a great move, unless your tone palette (in terms of transient dynamic and volume pressure) isn't moving to much between presets. BTW, isn't about powercabs. IME, it's all about sending "vivid" signals out of the Helix, no matter the monitors. For some reason people seems obsessed to keep load of headroom, producing extremely weak output for no valid reason. If you balance your presets to stay solid and closer to the headroom ceiling (without breaking it), you are good with any monitoring system. Of course it also depends on the tone; a super glassy clean tone has LOAD of transients, so it does need more headroom... but from overdrive to high gain, keeping load of headroom is just a waste (and a problem for speakers that needs proper pressure to sound as they should).
    2 points
  20. Hi, It would help to know what HX product you are wanting to “Send” from? For example: Helix floor and Rack units each have 4 x 1/4” mono Send jack sockets Helix LT use 2 x 1/4” mono Send jack sockets HX Stomp and Stomp XL both use a 1/4” stereo Send jack socket. HX Effects uses 2 x 1/4” mono Send jack sockets Then on your mixer input - are the inputs 1/4” Mono, XLRs, or does it have a dedicated stereo 1/4” insert? Anyhow, if you connecting 1/4” Mono pairs to Mono (TR to TR)in then regular guitar cables will suffice - you know what they look like. If it is Stereo out to 2x Mono in you need a TRS to 2x Mono TR cable. Likewise, if the Sends are going to XLR you will need a similar cable - Stereo TRS to 2x XLR, or 2x Mono TR to 2x XLR. Some examples: https://www.amazon.com/DISINO-Microphone-Unbalanced-Interconnect-Dynamic/dp/B083P6S976/ref=sr_1_2?crid=2C8JFPJTH4BJ8&keywords=TR+1%2F4+Jack+to+XLR&qid=1663713768&sprefix=tr+1%2F4+jack+to+xlr%2Caps%2C227&sr=8-2 https://www.amazon.com/DISINO-Y-Splitter-Unbalanced-Quarter-Adapter/dp/B083QKRNVC/ref=sr_1_18?crid=1KS49KKFG3HR0&keywords=TRS+1%2F4+Jack+to+2X+XLR&qid=1663713854&sprefix=trs+1%2F4+jack+to+2x+xlr%2Caps%2C203&sr=8-18 https://www.amazon.com/Tisino-Stereo-Y-Splitter-Return-Insert/dp/B07K59P692/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?crid=3OP43XXXORVQB&keywords=TRS%2B1%2F4%2BJack%2Bto%2B2X%2B1%2F4%2BTR&qid=1663713999&sprefix=trs%2B1%2F4%2Bjack%2Bto%2B2x%2B1%2F4%2Bt%2Caps%2C175&sr=8-1-spons&th=1 Finally after having gone through all this, I am confused by your comment: “I split my signal using a IR to the send out to my mixer but want to go stereo.” An example of your preset would help here, because it is not very clear what you want to direct out of the Sends. The audio signal that leaves you regular outputs is stereo (unless you have a final block which collapses the signal to mono?). If you want to route the output of the parallel path which contains the IR from the Send socket, it will be mono (there is no stereo IR) unless it later passes through a stereo FX block. Hope this helps/makes sense - because now, I’m confused.
    2 points
  21. True; the gating will only help with preventing constant low level background noise and such in IEMs, and I did not mention noise in my original post (although it is another issue to control for). I agree; for the stuff that has potential to wreck your hearing, it is hard limiting that can kick in quickly that seems absolutely critical, via the pack, board, or essentially anywhere in the signal chain. As long as it is before ear damaging levels have the opportunity to reach your ears. This made me laugh 'cos it is exactly what I was getting at. Every one of those sudden ear puncturing types of events I listed has occurred in the monitors while I have been on stage at one time or another. Scary when it is directly in your ear. Using them for long periods of time at too high a volume during "normal" usage can cause damage as well (like any headphones/earphones). I guess as you summarized so well, although IEMs are often touted as being ear preserving, used incorrectly they also have a serious capacity for ear damage. More tips welcome from those who have the same concern when hooked up directly to the 'Matrix' :-)
    2 points
  22. It's frightening to think that IEMs are meant to protect your ears, yet might run amuck (or be misused) and permanently damage hearing. +130 dBs mainlined.
    2 points
  23. It would have helped if “your friend” had said what piece of HX gear this happened with, what computer system he is using, and the version of firmware he was updating from and to. The Factory Reset and Safe Boot procedures are different for each product. Find the list of Reset/SafeBoot options here: https://helixhelp.com/tips-and-guides/universal/reset-options I have said many, many times in these threads that I intended to stopped giving the instructions on how to recover from a failed update, so this time I suggest that you simply go to the main section of this Helix forum and type “Boot Error: Entered update mode” into the Search panel in the top right of the menu. From the results you will probably find one of the many previous lists of instructions posted by me, and many other users, who repeatedly supplied the solution on prior occasions. Hope this helps/makes sense.
    2 points
  24. I don’t use IEM, never got on with them at all, but I do get the point you make. Although, I wouldn’t expect a gate to help with the sound of a dropped mic, a live cable being jacked in, or feedback (I have read of an instance this accidentally happening in a studio and causing complete mayhem) - surely that sort of sudden signal burst passing the threshold would open a gate allowing the potentially damaging sound through. From what I have read about IEM, most receiver packs contain a built-in limiter, but a hard limiter on the mixer should be a big help. Other than that I wonder what sort of protection is available to stop people becoming like Brian Johnson of AC/DC.
    2 points
  25. Hi, First up, re: “lightly touching” footswitches to have them react is perfectly normal - they are capacitive footswitches. See page 7 of the HX Stomp Owner’s Manual. Second - using GarageBand with your Stomp. Connect it to your MacBook Air using a USB cable, and connect your powered monitors with the TRS cables to the 1/4” Output L/R sockets on the back of the Stomp. This should give you latency free monitoring from GB. Use the Audio MIDI Setup Utility application on your Mac to select the Stomp as your audio interface. There is a whole section in the Owner’s Manual describing the basics of using USB audio on page 55. link: https://line6.com/data/6/0a020a418962611d636e7c51b/application/pdf/HX Stomp 3.0 Owner's Manual - Rev D - English .pdf Here’s a video from the splendid Nick Hill giving the basics with an M1 MacBook Air. He is using Studio One as the DAW, but the principles described are the same. Hope this helps/makes sense.
    2 points
  26. Received the screws I ordered and I’m happy to report that they fit perfectly.
    2 points
  27. I opened a ticket with L6 support and they provided this information regarding the case screws. They are, in case anyone else ever needs them: M2.5 x 0.5 x 10MM PHILLIPS FLAT HEAD SCREW
    2 points
  28. Use a cable vs wireless if you plan on using fuzz FX. HXS has auto Input Impedance (RTM!) Set the HXS Input and Output to INSTRUMENT (RTM!). You're running into the Fender's Instrument jack. Don't use HXS amps or cabs. You could, but you'd be running HXS amps and cabs into the Fender preamp and cab. You might like it, but... Pay attention to the gain staging of your FX. That's it! Used with a Fender TM it's just like using a traditional pedal board.
    2 points
  29. When I got the Stomp two years ago, I started here: line6.com/hx-guitar-processor/resources Then I moved over to youtube.com/results?search_query=hx+stomp and refined the search with keywords that would bring me the desired results for what I wanted to achieve. It's all there.
    2 points
  30. Part information: " Here is the part number for the footswitch LED. 18-26-0011 Full Compass does not have a listing for it, so you would need to call them or email them directly for pricing. We have them in stock, so they would be able to get one to you. " Each LED element costs $2. I just went in and ordered 4 for the future. And ordered a bunch of microswitches on Amazon as well (since they tend to fail).
    2 points
  31. That's exactly what I did. Haven't had any issues either. Slightly disappointing. I've noticed that with the Helix firmware updates. They're just suddenly there. :D
    2 points
  32. That’s some big hope! We are all simple Helix/HX product users in here. There are no Line staff here, and only very occasionally do they visit these forums - See the “sticky comment” in the black banner stripe at the top of this page entitled “Welcome to the Line 6 forums!” If you really need to attract the attention of someone who actually works for Line 6, then your best option is over in the Digital and Modelling Group area on TGP, or the Helix Family group on Facebook. https://www.thegearpage.net/board/index.php?forums/digital-modeling-gear.53/ https://www.facebook.com/groups/428105950706417 Oh, yeah - You will need to get used to the idea that you will only ever find out about when something “drops” after it has happened. Hope this helps/makes sense.
    2 points
  33. For the time being, leave Window's 11 Core Isolation Memory Integrity feature OFF!
    2 points
  34. Always give priority to the workstation goal before the windows update. Common rule for DAWs or graphics workstations is to hold system updates, unless it's really necessary. Never let Windows to just auto update overnight.
    2 points
  35. The 8 snapshots are already assigned to footswitches. You can see them when you enter Snapshot Footswitch mode (see manual pg 15). You can also assign a Snapshot to a Footswitch in Stomp mode, but to understand what that means I suggest you start by reading the manual. There is also great flexibility in the Global Settings for Footswitches (pg. 68).
    2 points
  36. 2 points
  37. 'But after hitting a Snapshot, all 3 switches change which is confusing (especially when playing live)...' This is probably what I was talking about in my previous post. You need to make the SAME footswitch assignments under EACH snapshot that will have a footswitch assignment. What is happening is when you first go into Command Center, snapshot one is selected by default, so while under that, if you assign 'Crunch', 'OD', and 'Distortion' to the Footswitches like in your photo, those assignments ONLY exist when you are using snapshot one. As soon as you hit 'OD' which lets say is 'Snapshot 2', the other footswitches will change to a random value because you haven't actually defined how snapshots should mapped under snapshot 2. You only defined it under snapshot 1, but once you hit the OD or DIST snapshot, you're no longer using snapshot one. I wish line 6 would add a checkbox in command center that says something like 'apply to all snapshots' so you could tell the helix this footswitch assignment should be applied to all snapshots, but for right now, you need to manually define each assignment under each snapshot you plan on using. I've had my Helix for about 2 1/2 years now. By and large this forum has been very friendly and helpful.. Just ignore the RTFM posts, they don't reflect the majority of people that contribute here. The manual while good, I find was written to better serve people who have used the product for some time as opposed to being a 'teaching how to use Helix' type manual. I feel it's more of a reference manual than true 'user's guide'.
    2 points
  38. Nobody from L6 hangs out here. Submit new feature ideas here: https://line6.ideascale.com/a/login Do a search first and vote on existing requests before submitting a new one to prevent watering down the votes.
    2 points
  39. Don’t do that. I believe both drivers are necessary. One provides the ASIO apiece for your DAW and the other serves general audio output from your PC (no DAW involved). You’re right, of course, that HX Edit is the online editor. However, Line 6 has chosen to bundle several components in the HX Edit download. It’s an installer package, not just the HX Edit program. It includes the HX Edit program, the Line 6 Updater program, and all required drivers for the Helix device. They bundle these components together to make it simple for the user. It ensures that the user always installs a compatible set and doesn’t need to know the details of which components are required and compatible. Not all of these components are updated with every Helix update, but sometimes one or more of them are updated. You don’t need to know that. If you start deselecting them you invite a situation where you have incompatible components installed. Why do that?
    2 points
  40. Hi, I think that you should have named this thread - “Windows 11 suddenly incompatible with latest Line 6 drivers”. This has been brought to folks attention previously in this thread here: This on a par with the Mac fraternity blaming Line 6 for issues brought about by Apple making changes to their OS. People require time to catch up with spurious updates. Hope this helps/makes sense. EDIT: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/why-do-incompatible-drivers-prevent-using-memory-integrity-0b7ae567-74de-ee03-1030-9e6fe0d6f4b6
    2 points
  41. IMO.... I might agree that a Fractal can be "easier" to get a better core tone, but I don't believe the "amps" are inherently better. I believe this is mostly the result of the stock cabinets... and options within. Fractal currently has more options to manipulate the stock cabs, mics, etc... (great for the power user) Fractal has better "default settings" of said cabs/mics/positions. (great for the person that just wants a quick great tone) The rumors are flying that this will be part of the next Helix update... if true (and done right), it could flip this debate on it's head rather quickly. Time will tell.... NOTE: I do agree that the Helix factory presets and many of the "default" settings for amps and effects leave a lot to be desired. It's not an issue for me because I always roll my own tones, but I can see where having better tones instantly can help many/most people.
    2 points
  42. Connect your Helix to your PC via USB and connect your speakers to the Helix outputs, either 1/4” or XLR. Your Helix becomes your computer’s soundcard, and all PC-generated audio is routed to the Helix (e.g. YouTube, Spotify, backing tracks, …). The speakers need to be powered, and a good choice for home use would be studio monitors. I would go with minimum 6” speakers. There are lots of good options in your local audio stores, and plenty of threads here that discuss the options.
    2 points
  43. When you change Snapshots it's loading the value SAVED in THAT Snapshot. If Global Settings>Preferences>Snapshot Edits is set to RECALL, then when you return to the edited Snapshot it will RECALL your changes, but when you change a parameter in a Snapshot the parameter only changes for THAT Snapshot, not ALL Snapshots. That's how it works, not a "bug". Snapshot Bypass ONLY affects the Bypass state of a Block. When ON if you change the Bypass State then change to another Snapshot it loads the SAVED Bypass state. When OFF the change is retained regardless of the SAVED Bypass state. Having an option to apply Snapshot Bypass functionality to Parameters has been requested on Ideascale. Go there, search for "Snapshot Bypass" and VOTE for ALL of the entries pertaining to Parameters. https://line6.ideascale.com/a/login
    2 points
  44. Yes. An update is coming 'soon'. Apply your own definition of 'soon' to either be disappointed or elated when it's released.
    2 points
  45. WOW! So, we couldn't tell you how to fix your personally customized Windows 11 (a pretty new OS) configuration, so we must be jerks. Don't let the door hit you in the a$$ on the way out and PLEASE don't come back! You're WAY too advanced for us poor hillbillies!
    2 points
  46. Do you believe in magic?
    2 points
  47. Go back to 19:20. That's where he sends the signal to Path 2A. Or you could refer to Page 16 in the manual...
    2 points
  48. One issue with modelers is how we learn to use them. It's often at low volumes with headphones or studio speakers, playing by ourselves. That has a tendency to encourage us to use too much gain/distortion, too many effects all run too wet - because it sounds so good and so controllable by itself. And we can do it while the kids are asleep. However, when we get into a mix or live setup, all that distortion and wet effects turns into mush that nobody can hear against a real amp, bass and drums. I think we'll have better luck experimenting with modelers in the context of songs and rehearsal performances where we play in the context of the song, in a mix with others at gig volume. Modelers can do that, but usually don't if you set them up in your living room by yourself. Regarding playing over gear, I think whatever floats you boat is fine and there's no need to put any value judgment on one over the other.
    2 points
  49. Yes, this works. Just be aware that when you set REMOTE to GLOBAL, that is GLOBAL to ALL Helix Presets, and you are NOT using L6 Link for any of the other possible per preset parameters such as MODE (FRFR LF Flat/LF Raw) or SPEAKER. PER PRESET CONTROL IS DISABLED! If you're using MIDI for those parameters it doesn't matter. Yes, This works. But ONLY affects the DIGITAL OUTS. Your XLR Outs are unaffected. The difference between the DIGITAL OUTS (at 0db) and the XLR OUTS (at 0db and LINE LEVEL) is <>6db with DIGITAL being LOUDER. So, if you set your PC's XLR INPUTS at +6db the levels should be approximately equal. Forget the "perfect" amber LED. As @PierMsaid, its main purpose is to indicate where you're starting to run out of headroom. Not to the overall TONE when above Fletcher-Munson (<>85db). To the MAX AVAILABLE OUTPUT LEVEL without distorting the PC's Inputs it DOES make a difference. Again, as @PierMsaid, too low and it brings up the noise floor when you adjust the Output Level to compensate. However, if your PC is loud enough for your purposes then no, it doesn't matter that much. Bottom line - the MOST important thing is that, using DIGITAL or ANALOG inputs, when changing presets, your presets need to: NOT be so high as to distort the PC's inputs. NOT be so low as to cause you to drop out of the mix. If they're mostly level to your ears, you should be good. HOWEVER - If you're using the PC's XLR OUTS to go to a board, the level at the XLR OUTS = the INPUT LEVEL, NOT the PC's overall Output Level. IOW - the PC's VOLUME KNOB has no effect, but the Helix Volume Knob DOES! That's why I disable the BIG KNOB when going to FOH. If, for instance, your cable drags across the BIG KNOB and changes it from noon to MAX, you'll have a VERY unhappy sound tech!
    1 point
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