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Kilrahi

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Everything posted by Kilrahi

  1. Okay let me take a crack at this: 1. Digitech 150 - It's hard for me to comment on this as I've never owned a Digitech. Is it possible? Yeah, it's possible assuming it has the ability to interface with a DAW (which from quickly looking at it it does) and if in addition to accepting a guitar signal it has another input for accepting a jam track of some kind (for this I couldn't see one - can it accept it via USB at the SAME time it tries to record?). Also, if it can accept a guitar signal, can you have all of its effects off so that it doesn't impact the sound created by your HD 500x and tube amp? In short, there's a lot of what ifs, and it sounds like a lot could go wrong. Maybe, though, you'd strike pay dirt. That happens sometimes. 2. Peavey valveking II 20 w/speaker defeat - Yeah this is also possible BUT . . . The real gist of it is this - and yes, this is my opinion so take it as you want, but it's meant kindly. I think you're trying to mix two different goals that are best kept separate (jamming and recording). In my opinion, there is NO way to catch the "sweet sweet tube amp sound" which, as far as I can tell, is actually a feeling, not a sound, by recording it. The moment you mic one up that "sweet sweet sound" is no longer present on the recording as far as I can tell. Plus, in all of the scenarios you describe, you aren't even mic'ing it up - which is the only legitimate way to even attempt to capture a tube amp sound - which means you'll just be getting a digital emulation of your amp anyway (particularly in option number 2). My suggestion would be when you want to jam, JAM! Turn on a stereo, and play with your guitar, through your Pod, into your tube amp. No recording, unless you plan on actually mic'ing up your live performance. When you want to record, focus on that. Set your Pod to the best amp emulation you can and record that straight into your DAW. Or, if you really want to be a purist, figure out how to mic the sounds of your guitar amp and get that transferred into your DAW. If you try and mix and match goals I don't think you'll ever be happy, and you'll probably end up with half assed versions of jamming, and half assed versions of recording.
  2. All he's really saying is equivalent to "You should hear songs through a standard stereo speaker system." That's it. So the "audio interface" can be something as simple as your phone, or any music player. The "flat response speakers" really just have to be standard speakers used for music players. In the guitar world, a very popular brand of cheap full range speakers are the Headrush FRFR like the 108 (https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/FRFR108--headrush-frfr-108-2000-watt-1x8-inch-powered-guitar-cabinet). You really don't have to go even that pricey, though, for just listening to music. It just depends on how picky you are. Whatever the case though, the point is hearing a song through a guitar amp will sound like melted butt because the guitar amp will cut off a lot of the frequencies of the song (particularly the higher range stuff). The hard part is sending it all through the Pod because you want the jam tracks to go to the stereo system, and the guitar to go to the tube amp. I don't actually think the Pod will let you do something that complex. You can send it all to a tube amp, or all of it to an FRFR. As far as I know, you can't do both. Still, I haven't had my Pod in quite some time, Maybe the advanced users will tell me I'm wrong on that one.
  3. If you register it, you have a two year warranty from the day of purchase so long as you have the original receipt. I've had volume covers pop off before and you could just pop them back on. Is the cover actually broken? If it can't be popped back on I'd open a support ticket and go through the process of getting it fixed.
  4. I can't quote chapter and verse, but I did read a post on "The Gear Page" from Digital Igloo who indicated that increasing the length of the looper time was potentially a possible avenue that they could go down once Helix Core was implemented. Will they? I think a looper is one of those areas that if you need something more complex, you're best buying a more complex looper. Personally, I'd rather they save whatever space they got or can use to add more amps/effects (but hell, maybe it's not an either or decision, so that would change things). I'm not anti looper either. I pre-ordered the new Boss RC-10R a few days ago.
  5. I was messing with this one last night, and I still love it. The whole host of drives in the Helix is perfect in my opinion. Is there a vital one missing? I can't think of it. Occasionally I read people say they're disappointed with the Helix's drives and I have a serious WTF moment. Then I go eat a sammy and down a Coke to forget about how crazy life is.
  6. If you can't get it to work, let me know. I can always try fiddling with it myself to see what works best.
  7. Interesting. I've never needed a clean sound to just fade . . . and to have dirt fade in, or vice versa . . . Still, my thoughts are yes, you can. Most obviously, it seems like if you tied an expression pedal to the drive of a dirt pedal it's pretty much fading in . . ..BUT it sounds like you want something a little more distinctive than this so . . . As you suggested in your original post, another option would be the two signal path approach. A clean signal path (Path A) and a dirty signal path (Path B). Then tie an expression pedal to the mixer block at the very end. Set it to an A/B block, and have the expression pedal control the amount of A and B at any given time, with all the way down on the expression pedal completely shutting off A, and all the way up completely shutting off B. If you move the pedal based on this it will fade in your clean and dirt depending on the position of the pedal. This is just ONE way to get there . . . and it's block intensive, but still it might get you what you're after. In my opinion, the HX line's greatest strength, even beyond the quality of its modeling, is the huge routing possibilities. There is usually a MULTIPLE ways to achieve something. The challenge is thinking them up, and choosing the best one.
  8. That really depends upon the sound you're trying to achieve. Gain blocks will interact with other blocks within the signal chain to produce unique sounds/distortion depending upon what you have after it. If you like that . . . great . . .if not, don't do it. In regards to the original poster, they were using an HX Stomp which has only 6 blocks. When I was using the Stomp, and because of that unique limit, anytime I could get away with using the output block OR some level option (such as on the amp) I would go that route instead.
  9. Are you sure you understand what codamedia is saying? He's referring to the level adjuster on the FX block. If you set the Stomp's "left send" to line level, and you discover that that's too high, you can then use the FX block in the signal path to reduce the volume of the left send, essentially bringing it down to instrument level. The HX line has tons of level options within a signal chain for balancing all of this crap out. It's been a while since you got the feedback above, what happened when you experimented? Did it work?
  10. Kilrahi

    Snapshots Helix LT

    Well . . . the answer is yes you can use them all. Both devices allow for 8 snapshots. So when you try to do it, what do you see? Only some of them?
  11. Anytime you describe a sound it can be problematic because the question becomes if I am thinking of the same sound you are. Especially the term "hum," as I don't usually use that term unless there's a problem (like from a ground loop). Nevertheless, high gain presets will have a lot of noise when you're not playing. That's part of what high gain is all about. There is always sound happening around your electric guitar so even when you aren't strumming, electrical noise is happening and is being sent to the Firehawk. High gain amps heavily ramp up everything they receive with . . . well . . . with gain. So even when you're not really playing anything, yes, there's gonna be a bunch of noise. One thing you can do to see if we're thinking of the same thing is use the Firehawk's noise gate, or place a noise gate at the start of the chain on purpose. If the noise you're hearing subsides a bit (not disappears, but drops in intensity), then yes, we're thinking of the same thing, and it's perfectly normal.
  12. It's possible . . . I'm not sure it's the best way to do it. To do what you want, you would need to connect the expression pedal to control some option that adds dirt. For example, pushing it past a point could activate an overdrive pedal OR it could increase the drive of an overdrive pedal. It can be tempting to try to mimic an old way of doing things with a new device. However, I think the HX Effects has a lot better options. Snapshots are probably the best example, where with a push of a button you can change up to 64 settings in your signal chain. It doesn't take anywhere close to 64 changes to add dirt.
  13. In my opinion, those who successfully embrace FRFR are those who don't need it to have an "amp in a room" feel. I wanted an FRFR in the room feel ... and it did that perfectly. Powercab is your best bet, but if you really want an amp in the room, it's a scientific fact you need to place an amp in the room.
  14. It would still be better to go a different route. Plug one of you into an FX return and put them on the second path. Your earlier way won't hurt it, but the above way will have unmatched separation of sound, and you can each set up your own signal chain.
  15. Kilrahi

    Helix II

    Maybe. The thing is though, we always want MORE. Any processor created will always be able to have more power for one user than if it's split between two users. Historically, what two users can do with a Helix now is pretty crazy (each can have their own amp block, reverb, delay, modulation, wah, compression AND distortion and in most traditional cases they won't max out the DSP). However, BECAUSE we've seen how crazy one user can get with the Helix, we automatically wish that two people could do the same. For the next generation processor the same thing is likely to happen. You'll still feel like two users are limited, even if it's more advanced than what 99% of guitar players have done for decades.
  16. Kilrahi

    Helix II

    Prove it I say!!!!
  17. The one I was looking at was the new Disaster Area Designs Midi Baby. It's a great size for the Stomp, and you have some control over the led choices. https://www.disasterareaamps.com/shop/midi-baby Edit: To be clear, the Stomp won't control the LEDs of the Midi Baby. However, if you knew what you intended to control with the Midi Baby, you could set the color of the Midi Baby so that you remember better.
  18. One nice thing about the HX is that the FX blocks have their own volume controls which can allow you to subtly tweak things if the levels aren't quite right. My advice would be to start setting the HX's output l/mono to "line" level. Leave everything else at instrument. If you don't like what you hear, then go in and set the HX send/returns to line. Try that first. If it still doesn't work, well, come back and say what the problem was and we can experiment some more. Edit: Just saw codamedia's advice above which I think is more explanation on the same thing I was saying too. Use a combination of these tools. It might take some adjusting, but you'll get there.
  19. What defines a "good" price? $50 . . . hell, sure. $300? Ummm . . . you're better off going FRFR like is said above. I had a pretty wonderful acoustic amp. One day when I had nothing else available for amplification, and a bit curious, I decided to see if I could make it sing as an FRFR for the HX Stomp. It actually did much better than I expected. My conclusion was this can work as a budget option depending on how good the acoustic amp is, but if a Helix player had $300 for a FRFR or an acoustic you'd be nuts to get the acoustic.
  20. I've seen a few midi controllers that had a programmable LED. They were probably thinking about the Stomp when they designed it. However, even if you do find an external footswitch that has a LED, the Stomp itself doesn't support sending color coding to external footswitches so I think you'd be out of luck.
  21. No there's not. You have to have a device connected to view anything in HX Edit. You COULD do it with Helix Native if you purchased that. To transfer the presets to the Stomp you will need to reduce your block count and save that preset, then import it to the Stomp. This isn't necessarily as hard as it sounds even without Native. Simply edit it down to six blocks while the HX FX is connected, and then save that preset to your PC. Then unplug HX FX, plug in HX Stomp, and import that preset.
  22. That was one of my disappointments with the Stomp too in the midi realm. It seemed like it would be wise to have a preset advance or back off command. Still, with the Morningstar, you have SO many control options that I don't think having the controller emulate FS4 and FS5 is a big deal. The only thing you'd be missing out on is the expression pedal option, but you could leave that to the Morningstar too. Still, another option that I liked even better was having the Morningstar have a button set to cycle stomp modes. From there you can use the Stomp itself, while in "preset" mode to move up or down presets, and in my opinion, it's very easy to do.
  23. No it's not a global setting. Are there other blocks in the preset in use? Could you be out of DSP?
  24. Kilrahi

    HX Effects Advice

    I'm worried I don't understand your questions. For example, on question 1, you're just wondering if you can have the HX wah before your "real" OD pedal? The answer is yes, use an FX block. However, in question 2 you mention the FX block which means you must know about them, so I'm thinking I don't get what you're asking? As for question 2 ... huh? I have no idea what you're asking here. You want to use a "real" modulation pedal but you can't because your HX Effects is already using a modulation block? That's how I understand that question but the solution is too obvious (remove the HX block) so that must not be what you mean.
  25. Nope nothing . . . If I HAD to guess, and again, it's just a guess, but I don't think it's going to work in the way you're envisioning it. For example, the Pod HD500x was once their premier modeler. Now it's their budget modeler. The Firehawk FX was less a new device and more a reworking of all previous models including the Pod 500x. So the budget modeler you're paying with now was, once upon a time, part of their premier modeler tech. That technology transitioned into the budget modeler once the next evolution had been released. If they're smart, I think this is how they'll do it in the future. Someday . . . and I think it's a ways out, but someday there will be a top of the line successor to the Helix. At that point, rather than invent a new budget modeler with new budget model designs, they will instead have the old Helix transition into the budget model. Maybe they'll even do a new piece of hardware, similar to what was done with the Firehawk, that offers the older HX line in a new way. That approach is what makes sense, and is a better use of their capital.
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