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Found 44 results

  1. The XD-V75 receiver firmware can be updated via the mini-USB port connection to a host computer (Windows XP or better, or Mac OSX 10.5 or better) using the Line 6 Monkey software application. In addition, the XD-V75 receiver can function as an "interface" to update the Relay G90 and XD-V70 receivers. Updating an XD-V75 Receiver: Remove any currently connected Antennas from the BNC jacks. Power Switch to "Off" on the receiver, then disconnect the power cable to the XD-V75 Receiver. Connect a mini-USB cable to the back of the receiver mini-USB port and your host computer. Reconnect the power cable to the XD-V75 Receiver. LCD Display on the XD-V75 receiver should read: "LOADER ENABLED" (regardless if you physically flip the Power Switch to "On" or not). Launch Line 6 Monkey 1.50 (or higher, depending on current release build as of this reading). Be certain to log on in Monkey. Click on "Connect To Device" on the left. Choose "Line 6 Wireless Device USB" and click OK. In the following window, select "XD-V75 Receiver" in the list of all the wireless devices that appear. Click on the "Flash Memory" in the Update window. Click "Update Selection" or "Reinstall Latest", whichever appears. Click "I ACCEPT" and then "Yes". Don't break the USB connection during the update process. When completed you should see a "XD-V75 Receiver update successful" message. Click "OK". To get the receiver out of Loader Mode, unplug the unit, remove the USB cable, plug in the power and turn the unit on. Updating the G90 or XD-V70 Receivers: Look at the pictures in the Device Positioning for Updating XD-V7x Transmitters and Receivers document for the visual reference on how the devices must be positioned/connected physically for a successful update. Once the device to be updated is positioned/connected, follow steps 3-5 above to put the XD-V75 Receiver into Loader Mode. Click the Change Device button in Line 6 Monkey. Choose "Line 6 Wireless Device USB" and click OK. On the next screen, choose the appropriate device to update. Once Monkey switches to the new target device to be updated, follow along in the update wizard instructions in the Line 6 Monkey software window. Monkey will program the XD-V75 receiver to "connect" to the device to be updated. If you do not power up the target device when prompted within about 30 seconds, the connection will time out and give you the error message "No pass thru receiver found". After you click OK, you'll get an error message saying "Error connecting to device". Hit OK and Monkey will reprogram the XD-V75 again, then ask you to power up the target device. After powering up the device, Monkey will be ready to update it. Follow steps 8-10 above. When the update is complete, you will get a message saying so. You will also get instructions for verifying the version on the unit. To get the receiver out of Loader Mode, unplug the unit, remove the USB cable, plug in the power and turn the unit on. Having problems? Some users that were reporting errors had success when using a different computer and repeating the process. Try re-booting your computer and starting from the top by first re-flashing your V75 receiver. Once this is done you can proceed to flashing other units. If you are still having problems, create a support ticket from http://line6.com/support/tickets/. Please complete the System Profile in your account and send us a "Monkey Log" in the ticket: 1) Run Monkey until the error is encountered 2) Choose "Diagnostics..." from the Line 6 Monkey main menu (at the top of the Mac Finder) 3) A finder window will open up - you will see one or more .log files with date-stamped filenames. 4) Send the most recent log file - or any of the log files whose date correspond to the date when the error occurred.
  2. The XD-V75 receiver firmware can be updated via the mini-USB port connection to a host computer (Windows XP/Vista/7 or Mac OSX 10.5/10.6/10.7) using the Line 6 Monkey software application. In addition, the XD-V75 receiver can function as an "interface" to update other Line 6 XD-V7x Digital Wireless devices. The actual instructions are provided via the Line 6 Monkey software's step-by-step wizard. This article was created to help clarify the actual physical positioning of devices, as this will have a direct bearing on the success rate of updating the other devices in question. 1. XD-V75 Update of an XD-V75 (or XD-V70) Microphone Transmitter: note that the microphone's update chip is near the middle-top portion of the microphone; the mic is positioned sitting on top of the XD-V75's attached antenna (folded to the left/downward at a 90-degree angle), which is connected to "B OUT": 2. XD-V75 Update of a TBP12 Transmitter (physically place the transmitter as such on top of the B Out single antenna): 3. XD-V75 Update of an XD-V30 Transmitter: 4. XD-V75 Update of an XD-V70 Receiver (Note: mandatory usage of Balanced, or 'stereo' TRS 1/4" cable inbetween the XD-V75 and XD-V70):
  3. Line6Tony

    XD-V75 FAQ

    XD-V Digital Wireless Systems Comparison Page Receiver Output Level Adjust (Digital Gain Control): default is set to Unity Gain (0 dB), but now the XD-V75 Receiver provides users with the ability to adjust output "digital" gain by -18dB up to +12dB to provide more flexibility, especially when using third party microphones. Note: +12dB gain is NOT equivalent to "line-level" signal; this is still a "mic-level" signal. 14 Channels: up from the 12 Channels on our previous XD-V70 system. 10 Microphone models (for Hand-Held System) L6 (Line 6): Line 6 Custom 58 (Shure): SM58 B58 (Shure): Beta 58 57 (Shure): SM57 835 (Sennheiser): e835 935 (Sennheiser): e935 41 (Audio-Technica): AE4100 767 (Electro-Voice): N/D767A O5 (Audix): OM5 D5 (AKG): D5 *All product names above are trademarks of their respective owners, which are in no way associated or affiliated with Line 6. These trademarks of other manufacturers are used solely to identify the products of those manufacturers whose tones and sounds were studied during Line 6's sound model development. SHURE and SM58 are registered trademarks of Shure Incorporated. Sennheiser is a registered trademark of Sennheiser Electronic Corp. Audix is a registered trademark of Audix Corporation. Audio-Technica is a registered trademark Audio-Technica Corporation. Electro-Voice is a registered trademark of Telex Communications, Inc. AKG is a trademark of AKG Acoustics GmbH. 9 Custom EQ Filter models (for Lavalier/Headset/Transmitter Systems) SF1 (Speech Filter 1): Gentle High-Pass SF2 (Speech Filter 2): Gentle High-Pass and High-Cut SF3 (Speech Filter 3): Moderate High-Pass and High-Cut SF4 (Speech Filter 4): Gentle High-Pass, Mid-Cut and High-Cut SF5 (Speech Filter 5): Moderate High-Pass, Mid-Cut and High-Cut SF6 (Speech Filter 6): Aggressive High-Pass, Mid-Cut and High-Cut IF1 (Instrument Filter 1): Guitar Cable High-Frequency Roll-Off IF2 (Instrument Filter 2): Woodwind Instrument Enhancement IF3 (Instrument Filter 3): Brass Instrument Enhancement Audio Metering (LED 5) Red *Clip*: only lights up when audio signal is clipping (LED 4) -06dB: any peak signal -6dB or above (LED 3) -18dB: any peak signal -18dB or above (LED 2) -30dB: any peak signal -30dB or above (LED 1) -60dB: any peak signal -60dB or above Battery Metering (LED 5) Green: 5 or more hours left (LED 4) Green: 4-5 hours left (LED 3) Green: 3-4 hours left (LED 2) Green: 2-3 hours left (LED 1) Green: 1-2 hours left (LED 1) Red: 1 hour left (LED 1) Red *Flashing*: less than 40 minutes left Improved Dynamic Filter: minimizes unwanted handling or incidental background noise. OFF: No Filtering NORM: Filter for Singing TALK: Filter for Speaking RF Channel Scan: provides a visual map of the 2.4 GHz space in the System Setup of the Receiver Unit, enabling system technicians and performers to "map out" the 2.4 GHz spectrum when other wireless devices in proximity are active as well. It also provides visual indication of the RF1 and RF2 mode devices being operated in the range of the receiver. In short, allows the user to select channels that have lower background interference and to better avoid WiFi interference. Crypto Mode: a digital cipher scheme allowing secure open-channel communication in critical situations. Better known as encryption and allows to lock a transmitter to a receiver so that no other receiver (that doesn't have the code keyed in) to receive the transmission from that particular transmitter. This provides security for those who wish to keep their program material from being intercepted by unauthorized individuals. It is typically used in courtrooms, hospitals and board meeting rooms. Improved RF Out-Of-Band Isolation: improved radio front end providing better isolation from RF interference outside of the 2.4 GHz band. Normally RF signals that are not close to the tuned frequency of a receiver are ignored by that receiver, however when they are very close or very strong they may interfere with a receiver. We added an extra layer of protection and filtering to block signals from transmitters outside of the 2.4 GHz band. Mini-USB Port: for any future Firmware updates when new versions are release via Line 6 Monkey. It is now possible to update existing Relay and XD-V products via 1/4" TRS (stereo) cable or radio transmission from the XD-V75 antenna outputs with the XD-V75 Receiver. Dimensions XD-V75 Receiver: Standard 1 unit space height (1/2 width) rackmount Does USB 3.0 create interference in the 2.4GHz frequency range? USB 3.0 computer cables and peripherals, including hard drives, are known to emit radio frequency interference throughout the 2.4GHz band, which results in reduced range and/or performance for any 2.4GHz device in its proximity (including wireless keyboard or mouse, WiFi, etc.). We recommend placing any digital wireless receivers at least two meters away from the USB 3.0 device and its cabling. Below is a link to a study by Intel regarding this interference. http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html Additional Links: XD-V75 Manual XD-V Digital Wireless Microphones FAQ Digital Wireless Troubleshooting USB Firmware Updating USB Firmware Updating (Device Positioning)
  4. Français. Deutsch. What instruments and pickups can I plug into my Relay transmitter? Relay digital wireless systems basically just replace your instrument cable so basically you can plug anything into the transmitter that you could have plugged into your amp (as long as you don't exceed an input level of 6V p-p at the input). Examples: Instrument with piezo pickup - If you are currently happy with the sound you get from plugging from your instrument into your amp, then your rig will work just fine substituting Relay for your cable. The input of the Relay transmitter has a very high input impedance (1.3 Mohm) so as not to load down your instrument. This is equal to or even higher than most preamps specifically intended for piezo pickups. Stereo pickups with Y-Cord - Could also be standard pickups combined with a bridge saddle pickup. Again, if you are happy with the sound you get using this configuration then Relay will not get in the way of your sound. Or you could run each pickup to it's own individual Relay system which could then be split into stereo. Active instruments w/ preamps - If your instrument has an active preamp and is powered with a single 9v battery you will have no problems using Relay. If you have a double 9v preamp it is theoritically possible to clip the input of the transmitter but unlikely in the real world. Should this actually happen you can remedy it by backing off a bit on the master volume control, adding a pad to the cable or removing one of the batteries. The extra headroom offered by these systems is only a benefit if it fits in with the system gain structure (unless you are using it to purposly clip the input of your amp). Remember, unused headroom is wasted. Where should I plug Relay into my chain? Relay replaces the cable from your instrument to wherever the other end of that cable was plugged into. Plug your instrument into the transmitter and plug the output from the receiver into wherever that cable was before. Generally speaking, you are un-tethering yourself from the first piece in your chain. You don't have to worry about gain or level matching as Relay is a "unity" device. That means you get the same level (voltage) at the output jack of the receiver as you are getting from the output of your instrument. Nothing changes ... Relay's output level is neither louder nor softer than the original. The output from the "tuner" out is exactly the same as the main output in level and impedance. Only difference is the pressing the "mute" button on a G50/90 transmitter shuts off the main out but leaves the tuner output active. The XLR and 1/4" outputs on the G90 are also identical and are provided to give the user more versitility in connecting to other gear. What IS different? Depending on how you've set the cable modeling, you could be sending a lot more "highs" into your system than ever before. This could result in more apparent noise or hiss. It would be the same as if you had connected your instrument into your system with a 1-foot cable (which is pretty difficult to do unless you are a contortionist guitarist!). Adjusting to the proper cable model should remedy this situation. On the other hand, if you are using an acoustic guitar leaving the model off will sound like the freshest set of strings you've ever played. Relay: Digital Wireless: Was schließe ich an und wie? Welche Instrumente und Pickups kann ich an den Relay Transmitter anschließen? Relay Digital Wireless ersetzt einfach nur das Instrumentkabel, Sie können also fast alles in Ihren Transmitter stecken, was Sie auch in Ihren Verstärker gestöpselt hätten. (Solange Sie die Eingangsspannung von 6V pp nicht überschreiten.) Beispiele: Instrumente mit Piezo Pickup: Wenn Sie zur Zeit schon froh sind mit dem Soun den Sie bekommen, wenn Sie Ihr Instrument normal in den Verstärker stecken, dann wird das auch mit Relay als Kabelersatz genau so gut funktionieren. Der Eingang des Relay Transmitters hat eine extrem hohe Impedanz (1,3 Mohm), damit Ihr Instrument nicht belastet wird. Diese Impedanz ist gleich oder höher der meisten Vorverstärker speziell für Piezo Pickups. Stereo Pickups mit Y-Kabel: (oder standart Pickups kombiniert mit "bridge saddle" Pickup). Wenn Sie zur Zeit schon froh sind mit dem Soun den Sie bekommen, wenn Sie Ihr Instrument normal in den Verstärker stecken, dann wird das auch mit Relay als Kabelersatz genau so gut funktionieren. Sie könnten aber auch die einzelnen Pickups separat an verschiedene Relay Systeme anschließen um das Stereosignal aufzuspalten. Aktive Instrumente mit Vorverstärkern: Wenn Ihr Instrument einen aktiven Vorverstärker hat und durch eine einzelne 9V Batterie angetrieben wird, werden Sie keinerlei Probleme mit Relay haben. Wen nSie aber einen Vorverstärker mit doppelter 9V Batterie haben, ist es theoretisch möglich den Eingang des Transmitters zu übersteuern. Sollte dies passieren können Sie das Problem lösen indem Sie das Master Volume ein wenig herunterdrehen, dem Ausgang ein Padding geben oder eine der Batterien entfernen. Die zusätzliche Freiheit bei hohen Frequenzen bei solchen Systemen ist nur dann von Vorteil, wenn es mit dem Gain des Sytems zusammenpasst. (Außer natürlich, Sie verwenden es um absichtlich das Singal zu übersteuern.) Denken Sie daran, dass nicht benutze Freiheit bei hohen Frequenzen verschwendet ist. Wo soll ich mein Relay in die Kette schalten? Relay ersetzt einfach nur das Kabel vom Instrument zum Gerät, welches Sie mit dem Instrument verbinden wollen. Stecken Sie das Instrument in den Transmitter und dann den Ausgang des Empfängers worin auch immer das Instrument vorher steckte. Sie müssen sich nicht mehr um Gain- oder Levelabstimmung kümmern, da Relay ein "Unity" Gerät ist. Das bedeutet, dass Sie immer die gleiche Spannung im Ausgang des Empfängers haben, wie Sie aus dem Ausgang des Instrumentes bekommen. Nicht ändert... Der Ausgangspegel ist nicht höher odre tiefer als das Original. Der Ausgang des "Tuners" hat denselben Ausgangspegel und –impedanz, wie der Main-Ausgang. Der einzige Unterschied ist, dass durch drücken des "Mute" Knopfes auf dem G50/90 Transmitter nur die Main-Ausgänge und nicht der Tunerausgang abgeschaltet wird. Die XLR und 6.35mm Ausgänge des G90 sind identisch und sind vorhanden um dem Benutzer mehr Flexibilität für die Verbindung seiner Ausrüstung zu verleihen. Was ist anders? Jenachdem, wie Sie das Kabel-Modeling eingestellt haben kann es sein, dass Sie weit aus mehr "Höhen" in Ihr System senden, als vorher. Dies könnte zu deutlicherem Rauschen und Zischen führen. Das wäre dann dasselbe, als wenn Sie Ihr Instrument mit einem 30cm Kabel an das System angeschlossen hätten. (Was eventuell schwer zu machen ist.) Das Anpassen auf das korrekte Kabelmodell sollte dieses Problem lösen. Andererseits, wenn Sie eine akustische Gitarre benutzen können Sie das Modell abschalten und Wird das ganze sich anhören, wie der frischeste Satz Saiten, den Sie je gespielt haben. Relay: Signal sans fil digital: Qu'est-ce que je branche et comment? Quels instruments et micros est-ce que je peux brancher dans le transmetteur Relay? Les systèmes numériques sans fil Relay simplement remplacent les câbles instruments, donc vous pouvez brancher tous les instruments que vous pouvez brancher dans l'ampli. (Tant que vous ne dépassez pas un niveau d'entrée de 6V pp à l'entrée). Exemples: Instruments avec micro piezo: Si vous êtes actuellement satisfait du son que vous obtenez de brancher votre instrument à votre ampli, votre rig fonctionnera très bien avec Relay comme remplacement pour le câble. L'entrée du transmetteur Relay a une impédance très haute 1,3 (MOhm) pour ne pas surcharger votre instrument. C'est égal ou même supérieur à la plupart des préamplis spécifiquement destinés aux micros piezo. Micros stéréo avec câble Y: (ou micros standard combiné avec un micro bridge saddle). Vous êtes actuellement satisfait du son que vous obtenez de brancher votre instrument à votre ampli, votre rig fonctionnera très bien avec Relay comme remplacement pour le câble. Ou, vous pouvez connecter chanque micro avec un système Relay individuel pour le diviser en stéréo. Instruments actives avec préamplis: Si votre instrument a un préampli actif et est allumé avec une seule batterie 9V, vous n'aurez aucun problème avec Relay. Si vous avez un préampli double 9V, c'est théoriquement possible de brancher l'entrée du transmetteur mais c'est peu probable en réalité. Si cet événement se produit, vous pouvez reculer un peu sur le Master Volume, ajouter un pad sur le câble ou enlever une des deux batteries. La marge supplémentaire offerte par ces systèmes est seulement un avantage si elle s'inscrit dans la structure de gain du système (sauf si vous l'utilisez pour couper intentionnellement l'entrée de votre ampli). Rappelez-vous, marge non utilisée est perdue. Où est-ce que je dois brancher Relay dans la chaine? Relay remplace le câble de votre instrument à n'importe quel appareil vous voulez connecter votre instrument. Branchez votre instrument dans le transmetteur et la sortie du récepteur dans n'importe où ce câble était avant. Vous n'avez pas à vous soucier de gain ou de niveau correspondant parce que Relay est un appareil d '«unité». Ca veut dire que vous recevez le même niveau de tension au jack de sortie que vous recevez de la sortie de l'instrument. Rien ne change… Le niveau de sortie de relais n'est ni plus fort ni plus douce que l'original. La sortie du "Tuner" est exactement le même que la sortie Main (principale) en niveau et impédance. La seule différence est que pousser le bouton "Mute" sur un G50/G90 éteints la sortie Main mais laisse la sortie du tuner actif. Les orties XLR et 6.35mm sur le G90 sont identiques et sont fournis pour donner plus versatilité à l'utilisateur pour se connecter à autres appareils. Quelle est la différence? Selon la façon dont vous avez configuré la modélisation de câbles, vous pourriez envoyer beaucoup plus d'«hauts» dans votre système que jamais auparavant. Cela pourrait entraîner du bruit ou sifflement plus apparente. Ce serait le même que si vous aviez connecté votre appareil dans votre système avec un câble de 30cm. (ce qui est plutôt difficile à faire) Ajustement au modèle de câble approprié doit remédier à cette situation. D'autre part, si vous utilisez une guitare acoustique laissant le modèle off retentit comme l'ensemble le plus nouveau de cordes que vous n'avez jamais joué.
  5. Specifications and frequency response graphs can be found in the word document below: Line 6 Wireless Mic Specs.doc
  6. Elevation drawings for XD-V70 receiver (RX212). All dimensions are in millimeters RX212 - elevations.PDF
  7. Specifications for XD-V30 series digital wireless systems XD-V30_spec.pdf
  8. Specifications for XD-V70 series digital wireless systems XD-V70_spec.pdf
  9. ****If you recently purchased a Relay V75-SC Super Cardioid Microphone and that capsule does not have microphone models when placed on another XDV-75 handheld microphone body, then you will need to update the firmware on that handheld microphone to version 2.10. Instructions for updating Line 6 wireless systems can be found in other Knowledge Base articles.**** Range XD-V 70/75 systems are rated at 300 feet under ideal conditions and the XD-V30 systems are rated at a 100 foot range. This ‘Open Air Wireless Range’ also known as ‘Line of Sight’, meaning the transmitter’s antenna must have a clear path to the receiver’s antenna and be reasonably free of interference. For best performance ‘Line of Sight’ should be maintained between the receiver’s antennas and the transmitter’s antennas. Radio waves travel in straight lines and do not go around corners. Barriers such as walls can impede the path of radio waves depending on the thickness and the type of construction. RF will not transmit efficiently through metal barriers. If you have aluminum siding or a metal roof, it is unlikely the RF signal will transmit through this barrier with much efficiency. When using wireless systems indoors you could experience a moderate reduction in range compared to outdoors depending on conditions. RF will not transmit through the earth so if the receiver is placed in the basement, and the earth or ground is obstructing the line of sight transmission, it will not receive the direct signal. Human bodies also absorb RF energy and can affect maximum range so remember to place your antennas accordingly. Avoid cupping the bottom of the handheld mic as it will block the antenna resulting in a loss of range. Another significant reduction of range can be expected if the receiver antennas for the XD-V systems are very close to other intentional radiators in the same frequency band such as Wi-Fi wireless access points. Using the XD-V70 with remote paddle antennas and separating the antennas by several feet can be an effective way to mitigate this condition. Interference Q: What is the difference between Analog and Digital wireless systems handling of interference? A: Since the XD-V wireless system is digital, it is able to ‘intelligently’ ignore all signals that are not specifically intended for it. As a result, no audible interference can be generated due to other RF signals occurring simultaneously with the XD-V RF signals. Additionally, the XD-V system utilizes a frequency diversity system in which four different RF frequencies are transmitted for each single audio channel. Only if there are errors or loss of signal on all four RF frequencies within a single transmission packet will an XD-V system mute. Loss of RF signal can be the result of trying to function at too great a distance, having unintentional transmitters too close to a receiver (near/far), or a significant amount of close-by RF signals within the same 2.4GHz range (Wi-Fi, microwave ovens, etc.). In all cases, the symptoms will be the same: reduction of RF LEDs on the front panel that indicate usable RF signal strength, followed by the audio signal muting. Once good enough RF signal is received again, the signal will unmute. Put simply, all forms of potential interference for the XD-V system will have the net effect of reducing the total usable distance for the system. If your application does not require maximum range, then typically little concern about other radio signals is required. If you intend to use your system at a distance, it is recommended that you ‘walk test’ your system in advance of an event to verify that sufficient RF signal is available to avoid mutes from occurring over the entire desired range. Output Level Q: Why does the level change when I swap an XD-V digital wireless with my old wireless system? A: XD-V digital wireless are designed to be the same as a wired mic and are "unity" at the receiver's output relative to input to the transmitter. Most other wireless systems have gain stages that amplify the signal above the mic level itself. This means there is no relationship between the input level to the transmitter and the output level of the receiver. If the gain has been turned up on your old system then you will likely notice a drop in level when you hot-swap with an XD-V. This is a simple ‘gain-structure’ issue and is not a measure of sound quality. So if you hot-swap an XD-V wireless with the same mic as the model you have selected you will not need to make any changes to your gain structure. If you are replacing an older wireless unit that has gain added, you will need to balance the trim (gain) controls on your mixer inputs to accommodate the ‘unity mic level’ of the XD-V. This is why mixer inputs have gain adjustments ‘¦ so you can properly match mic preamp gain to the input source. Remember, XD-V digital wireless is mic level output only and must be plugged into a mic level input and not a line level input. If the trim controls are calibrated on your input strips a gain of 25-30 dB will probably be in the ballpark with an average vocalist. Frequency/Channels Q: What is different about the XD-V systems compared to the XDR-955? A: The XD-V30/XD-V70 systems use a higher frequency (2.4 GHz) and operate on 6 or 12 channels respectively, rather than 5. The XD-V channels numbers do not correspond to 802.11 Wi-Fi channels however. Q: Can the XDR-955 microphone be used with the XD-V systems? A: Both systems run in completely different frequency ranges so they are not inter-compatible, but X2 and XD-V units can be used on the same stage (along with any other analog wireless systems) with no problems. Q: Are the Relay G-series components compatible with the XD-V series components (or vice versa)? A: Because they both operate in the same 2.4 GHz frequency range, they are compatible. Q: Do the XD-V digital wireless systems share channels with the Relay systems? A: Both XD-V systems share their first 6 channels with the Relay G30. The XD-V70 shares all 12 of its channels with the Relay G50 and G90 models. A total of up to 14 systems can potentially be combined if the V70 firmware has been updated. Batteries and Power Supplies Q: Can I use rechargeable batteries? A: Yes, but the hours and minutes are calibrated to alkaline batteries. Different battery chemistries discharge at different rates, therefore the battery meter reading may be inaccurate when alkaline batteries are not used. The run time will be directly related to the current capability of the batteries. Some experimentation will be necessary to determine how they perform for you. Carbon Zinc batteries should not be used with XD-V wireless systems. Q: Why is the battery meter higher when I restart than when I shut off the transmitter? A: Line 6 2.4G wireless transmitters have a circuit that measures the actual real-time voltage of the installed batteries and transmits that data to the battery meters in the receivers. The battery meters are very accurate when they have been running continuously since new batteries were installed in the transmitter and the transmitter power has not been cycled on and off. However due to the chemical nature of Alkaline batteries, when they have been shut off, the voltage begins to ‘rebound ‘ and the voltage actually increases compared to its value at shutoff. Unfortunately it does not last long and it reverts to true self over twenty minutes or so. For this reason when you first turn on a Transmitter that has been run but allowed to rest the meter will give a high reading that quickly falls over the first few minutes and continues to fall quickly for the first few minutes. This is normal behavior for Alkaline batteries. Q: What's the battery life of XD-V digital wireless systems? A: Battery life depends on the current capacity of the batteries used. Typically AA alkaline batteries can provide about 2400 mAh and will provide about 8 hours of continuous use from two AA alkaline batteries when run on "high" power. Typically you will get 10 hours on the "low" power setting. Be aware of "alkaline rebound" when turning off the unit and turning it back on, as it may look like it has more power than it really has. Antenna Distro Q: Can the RX212 Receiver antennas be linked together? A: Up to 6 receivers can be daisy-chained together using the built-in antenna distro system. LMR-195 antenna cable is required for linking up multiple XD-V receivers. The last unit in the chain should be "terminated" (using the supplied term plugs) when linking receivers together. (Please see the Advanced User Guide). External Antennas Q: What type of antennas work with the XD-V70 receiver (RX212)? A: Line 6 offers both "omni"(P360) and "patch" (P180) directional paddle style antennas as options. http://store.line6.com/. These antennas have built-in line amps to accommodate long cable runs (up to 100' or more) depending on cable type. Antennas connect to Line 6 receivers with BNC connectors. LMR-195 cable (or better) should be used and the gain switch should be set to match the approximate loss of the cable. There are many specialty antennas made by third parties that may also be used. They must be specifically tuned for the 2.4GHz band. You must remember to take into account line loss when using passive antennas Mic Capsules for XD-V Handheld Transmitters Q: What mic capsules can be used with the XD-V handheld transmitters? A: XD-V Handheld transmitters have been designed to allow for the use of interchangeable capsules from 3rd party manufacturers such as Earthworks, Telefunken, Shure and others. However since there is no actual standard for compatibility there is some risk of unintended signal or mechanical issues. Users are advised to test specific combinations prior to purchase. Before replacing a capsule the power should be shut off. Simply screw on the desired capsule, then turn on the power. Mic modeling is bypassed (and not available) when using 3rd party capsules. Depending on the level of the capsule and the loudness of the person singing/speaking into it, the Environment filter may need to be switched ‘off’ if a gating sound occurs. Using Third Party Mics w/ Beltpacks Q: What is the pin-out for wiring to a TA4F connector? A: Pin 1 - Gnd Pin 2 - V+ Pin 3 - Signal Pin 4 - Z (leave open for instrument)(short to pin 3 for mic) For a normal, everyday, run-of-the-mill, Tip/Sleeve (TS) connector for a 1/4" instrument cable end,... the signal goes from 1/4" Tip to TA4F pin-3 (Signal), and 1/4" Sleeve goes to TA4F pin-1 (Gnd). Don’t worry about pins 2 and 4, those are used for Lavaliere Mic connections. Q: What mics work with the XD-V70 Beltpack Transmitter A: Questions often come up as to what mics are compatible with the system and how to adjust the gain to match other wireless systems. Line 6 XD-V70 beltpacks (TBP12) are essentially unity level devices meaning the output voltage of receiver essentially matches the input voltage of the transmitter. So it raises the question’¦ ‘match the level to what?’. Traditional systems are essentially a mic coupled with a preamp, not just a microphone alone. This may require thinking about your system in a new way. With traditional wireless systems that have limited dynamic range, gain and level control are essential if one hopes to have reasonable hiss free operation without excessive distortion. No gain or level matching is required when using XD-V wireless systems because of the XD-V’s wide dynamic range and compander free operation. So the system gain requirement is to have the speech or vocal input to the microphone present an appropriate level into the mic preamp so that the preamp can raise the voltage to be optimum into the next stage of the mixer. Gain is likely needed somewhere in this chain, but as long as the mic preamp has enough gain available there is no problem re-adjusting the input trim to do this. Just turn it up as much as needed. Just remember to plug the output of the XD-V into a ‘mic level’ input on the mixer as it is not intended to be used into a ‘line level’ input. In order to be able to certify a mic and being compatible one would have to know the distance from the user’s mouth and the level of their singing/speech. The sensitivity of both the Line 6 HS70 and the LM4-T lav mic is -46 dB, so using a mic that is approximately the same in sensitivity will result in a similar output voltage to the factory supplied mic. If a lower sensitivity mic were used with any traditional wireless system you would need to turn up the gain in the transmitter, receiver and/or the mixer. If the levels of these three controls are not in perfect sync with each other the result will be extra distortion or extra noise/hiss. With Line 6 XD-V is greatly simplified. Simply make adjustments at the mixer (in the same way as you work with a mic with a cable). Much less complicated (although it may be different than what a user is used to) it insures maximum headroom and far less chance to get it wrong. Just turn up the mixer, that’s why the knobs move. Remember, the relative position of a knob means almost nothing. The correct place is the correct place’¦ no matter where it occurs on the rotation. Examples: Shure® WL-185â„¢ lav is -45.5 dB WL-184â„¢ lav is -44.5 dB’¦ so these mics would be almost identical to The Line 6 LM4. WH30TQâ„¢ headset is -55 dB so it will need a 10 dB boost of the mic trim control on the mixer as compared to the LM4-T to have the same level. Countryman® E6 headsets come with different sensitivities and are specified per application. The E6ow5â„¢ is for general speaking and is the closest to our LM4 levels The E6ow6â„¢ is for strong speaking and singing The E6ow7â„¢ is for ‘powerful vocals’ and will seem very quiet if used for ‘normal speech’ as compared to our LM4-T. This would likely be a poor choice for general speech but could be the proper mic for a screaming singer. Countryman also provides caps to cover and further modify the mic element which can provide additional gain. Audio Technica® AT831â„¢ lav is -46 dB AT898â„¢ lav is -46 dB * Please double-check that the Audio Technica mic is a model equipped with the TA4F connector. You may need to special order a unit with the correct connection type or refit your existing cable end with the TA4F plug. DPA® 4066â„¢ omni headset is -44 dB 4061â„¢ omni lav is -44 dB 4060â„¢ high output omni lav is ‘“ 35 dB good with very quiet talkers or if the mic is some distance from the performer. Microphone sensitivity does affect the performance of the Environment Filter. If the sensitivity of the mic used is too low there may be audible artifacts. Depending on the situation it may be advisable to switch the filter to ‘off’. Racking V70/75 Receivers Q: How do I connect multiple receivers for rack mounting? A: The XD-V 70/75 half rack sized receivers can be locked together to become a single rack width using the supplied "dovetail key". When mounting a pair of receivers side by side, start with the dovetail inserted approximately half way in the side groove. Then start the second unit, from the front towards the rear and slide until they are closely aligned. A small tap with a mallet and block will align and secure the key in place and level the front faces. Use the short rack ear supplied with each receiver to complete the pair. Multiple rack pairs can be linked together by using dovetail keys in the top and bottom slots of a rack pair. When assembling more than a single pair it is recommended that the left ‘half’ and the right ‘half’ be assembled first and then the ‘halves’ joined together into the 19’ assembly. Wi-Fi Interference Q: Why does my Wi-Fi slow down when I get my transmitter near my computer? A: Because Wi-Fi and Line 6 2.4GHz wireless products share the same frequency band-space. Some users may experience a slowing down or even interruption of their Wi-Fi capabilities when using microphone or instrument transmitters in close proximity to their computers or routers. This is an example of a near/far interference problem and it may be intensified because consumer grade Wi-Fi typically has limited RF dynamic range. Using more XD-V channels operating at the same time will create more competition to Wi-Fi than a single channel would. If your Line 6 transmitter gets within 6 feet of your laptop you may witness this situation especially if your Wi-Fi access point is some distance away. Typically, simply moving your Line 6 transmitter farther away from your computer will remedy the situation. Users of Line 6 twelve channel systems can switch their transmitters to the ‘low power’ setting as this will mitigate the problem as well. If you are using the system outside the USA you can likely switch your Wi-Fi channels to 12, 13 or 14 depending on your location. The frequencies for these channels are outside the Line 6 2.4GHz frequencies. Likewise, switching Wi-Fi to 802.11n in the 5GHz band will avoid Line 6 wireless frequencies and double your potential Wi-Fi throughput. Suggested channels settings to avoid interfering with Wi-Fi. If your wifi network utilizes the channel listed, use the channel # listed under the Line 6 wireless channel column. Troubleshooting Q: Why am I getting dropouts? A: Assuming no hardware issues, dropouts generally occur because of local conditions. Do I have clear line of sight? The transmitter antenna should be able to ‘see’ the receiver’s antennas. Is your audience blocking the line of sight? Raising antennas to 6-8 feet high will often fix this problem. Make sure you are not being blocked by obstacles such as metal posts, walls, etc. Are your antennas connected firmly and splayed at 90 degrees? If they are straight up and down you could fall victim to a dead zone. Are other XD-Vs operating on the same channel? Each system needs its own unique channel to operate on. Do you have the receiver’s antennas near any intentional transmitters such as walkie-talkies, In-Ear Monitors, etc? They will need to be separated. The distance will depend on the strength of the transmitter and the gain of the transmitting antenna. Are you using the factory power supply? If you are using a substitute supply you must make certain it can supply the required 9vdc at 350 ma. Q: Why is the signal so weak compared to other wireless systems? A: XD-V digital wireless systems have "mic level" outputs (both XLR and 1/4" jacks) and need to be connected in the same manner as wired microphones are and with similar gain/trim settings. Plugging into a "line level" input or a channel with pads engaged will result in a weak and likely noise signal. The preferred connection is with the XLR output on the receiver to an XLR input on the mixer. The 1/4" output is unbalanced and is included as a convenience for users plugging into instrument amplifiers. It is important to NOT use TRS plugs into this jack as the "ring" is used for system upgrades and carries digital information that could be "noisy" if it were connected to an audio input. Q: Why is the sound so "thin"? A: This may be caused by the "Environment Filter" is the signal is too weak, especially when using lav mics. Try turning the filter to the "off" position. Q: What does the Near/Far spec mean? A: The Near/Far interference problem is common to all radio systems and happens when a strong RF signal in the same band uses a large portion of the available gain in a receiver making it difficult or impossible for the receiver to decode the weaker signal. Imagine having a conversation in a quiet room with a person 20 feet away from you. It is likely that you can carry on a conversation with normal voice levels. Now if you move to a noisy environment, with lots of other voices right around your ears, it may be very difficult for the conversation to continue with your long distance friend without the both of you shouting. A similar circumstance occurs with radios, and since the long distance transmitter is incapable of increasing its power output, it is very likely a very near transmitter may interrupt it. In the real world, this is rarely an unmanageable problem. You should avoid having a transmitter closer than 3 feet to a receiver that is not on your channel if the intended transmitter is more than 50 feet from this receiver. If this is a regular requirement you should install remote paddle antennas (G90, XD-V70 series). The near/far spec for XD-V70 is 50’/3’ which means if another transmitter (even though it is on a different channel) gets within 3 feet of your channels antennas at the same time you get 50 feet away the system could be affected in a negative manner.. By increasing the distance between antennas (using the paddle antennas) or simply raising the units up higher, it will become far less a possibility. LED Codes Q: What do the different LED colors mean on the XD-V system components? XD-V70 System THH12 Handheld Transmitter: No LEDs (see owner’s manual for LCD screen info) TBP12 Beltpack Transmitter LED states: Blue LED = power/>1hr battery life Solid red LED = Low Flashing red LED = Very Low/Change batteries Audio LED = Green LED (indicates audio signal) RX212 Receiver: Audio Green LEDs = audio signal present Battery Green LEDs = full battery life Red LED = less than two hours remaining Flashing red = Very Low / Change batteries RF Transmitter on same channel as receiver: Green to indicate signal strength/quality: from 5 Green = Data excellent, interference low to 1 Green meaning Data minimal, may have significant interference. When transmitter is off, or set to different channel than receiver these LEDs show as follows: No LED = No data, no interference 1 Red = No data, some potential interference up to 5 Red = No data, high potential interference. XD-V30 System THH06 Handheld Transmitter LED states: Channel LEDs - Illuminates blue to show the current active channel THH06 is transmitting on. Channel 6 LED will illuminate red when battery life is low and blink red when very low (change batteries). TBP06 Beltpack Transmitter LED states: Audio Green LED = Audio Signal Orange = On power/channel change Battery Blue LED = power/>1hr battery life Solid Red LED = Low Charge Flashing Red LED = Very Low Charge Purple: On channel change RXT06 Receiver LED states 3 Green = Data excellent 2 Green = Data OK, may have some interference 1 Green = Data minimal, may have significant interference No LED = No data, no interference 1 Red = No data, some interference 2 Red = No data, more interference 3 Red = No data, high interference Q: Does USB 3.0 create interference in the 2.4GHz frequency range? A: USB 3.0 computer cables and peripherals, including hard drives, are known to emit radio frequency interference throughout the 2.4GHz band, which results in reduced range and/or performance for any 2.4GHz device in its proximity (including wireless keyboard or mouse, WiFi, etc.). We recommend placing any digital wireless receivers at least two meters away from the USB 3.0 device and its cabling. Below is a link to a study by Intel regarding this interference. http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html
  10. Line6Tony

    2.4GHz Wireless FAQ

    Deutsch Français Q: Why is the battery meter higher when I restart than when I shut off the transmitter? A: Line 6 2.4G wireless transmitters have a circuit that measures the actual real-time voltage of the installed batteries and transmits that data to the battery meters in the receivers. The battery meters are very accurate when they have been running continuously since new batteries were installed in the transmitter and the transmitter power has not been cycled on and off. However due to the chemical nature of Alkaline batteries, when they have been shut off, the voltage begins to “rebound “ and the voltage actually increases compared to its value at shutoff. Unfortunately it does not last long and it reverts to true self over twenty minutes or so. For this reason when you first turn on a Transmitter that has been run but allowed to rest the meter will give a high reading that quickly falls over the first few minutes and continues to fall quickly for the first few minutes. This is normal behavior for Alkaline batteries. Q: Does USB 3.0 create interference in the 2.4GHz frequency range? A: USB 3.0 computer cables and peripherals, including hard drives, are known to emit radio frequency interference throughout the 2.4GHz band, which results in reduced range and/or performance for any 2.4GHz device in its proximity (including wireless keyboard or mouse, WiFi, etc.). We recommend placing any digital wireless receivers at least two meters away from the USB 3.0 device and its cabling. Below is a link to a study by Intel regarding this interference. http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html Q: Why does my wi-fi slow down when I get my transmitter near my computer? A: Because wi-fi and Line 6 2.4G wireless products share the same bandwidth some users may experience a slowing down of their wi-fi capabilities when using microphone or instrument transmitters near computers. This is an example of a near/far interference problem and it is heightened because consumer grade wi-fi has very low power. If your Line 6 transmitter gets within 6 feet of your laptop you may witness this situation especially if your wi-fi access point is some distance away. Typically simply moving your Line 6 transmitter farther away from your computer will remedy the situation. Users of Line 6 twelve channel systems should switch their transmitters to the “low power” setting as this will mitigate the problem as well. Suggested channels settings to avoid interfering with wi-fi: Q: What does the Near/Far spec mean to me? A: The Near/Far interference problem is common to most radio systems and happens when a strong signal captures a receiver making it difficult or impossible for the receiver to decode the weaker signal. Imagine having a conversation in a quiet room with a person 20 feet away from you. It is likely that you can carry on a conversation with normal voice levels. Now if you move to a noisy environment, with lots of other voices right around your ears it may be very difficult for the conversation to continue with your long distance friend without the both of you shouting. A similar circumstance occurs with radios and since the long distance transmitter is incapable of increasing its power output it is very likely a very near transmitter may interrupt it. In the real world this is rarely an unmanageable problem. You should avoid being closer than 3 feet to a receiver that is not on your channel if the intended transmitter is more than 50 feet from this receiver. If this is a regular requirement you will need to remote your antennas (G50, G90 XD-V70). FAQ zu 2.4GHz Wireless Warum ist die Batterianzeige höher wenn ich den Transmitter neustarte als wenn ich ihn abschalte? Line 6 2.4G Wireless Transmitter haben eine Schaltung integriert, welche die Spannung der installierten Batterien in Echtzeit misst und diese Daten dann an die Batterieanzeige im Empfänger sendet. Die Batterieanzeige ist dadurch sehr genau wenn das Gerät durchgehend gelaufen ist nachdem neue Batterien eingesteckt wurden und der Transmitter nicht abgeschaltet und neugestartet wurde. Aufgrund der chemischen Natur von Alkaline Batterien nimmt die Spannung jedoch ab wenn das Gerät abgeschaltet wird und übersteigt dann den Wert den sie hatte vor dem Abschalten. Leider hält dies nicht lange und springt wider auf Normal zurück nach ca. 20 Minuten. Wenn Sie also zum ersten Mal einen Transmitter anschalten der vorher gelaufen ist, wird Ihnen die Batterieanzeige eine hohe Anzhl ausgeben, die dann aber schnell wieder fällt innerhalb der nächsten Minuten. Das ist ganz normal für Alkaline Batterien. Entstehen Interferenzen durch USB 3.0 im 2,4GHz Frequenzbereich? USB 3.0 Computerkabel und –geräte sind dafür bekannt Interferenzen bei Radio Frequenzen im 2,4GHz Bereich zu erzeugen was zu verringerter Reichweite und Performance für alle 2.4GHz Geräte (inklusive kabellose Tastatur oder Maus sowie WiFi und viele andere) in der Nähe führen kann. Wir empfehlen alle digitalen Kabellosempfänger mindestens 2m von den USB 3.0 Geräten und deren Verkablung weit weg zu plazieren. Nachstehend können Sie einen Link zur Untersuchung von Intel über Interferenzen mit USB 3.0 finden: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html Warum wird mein WiFi langsamer wenn ich meinen Transmitter in die Nähe des Computers bewege? Da sich WiFi, sowie Line 6 2.4G Wireless Produkte die selbe Bandbreite teilen kann es sein, dass das WiFi bei manchen Benutzern langsamer wird wenn Sie Mikrofone oder Instrument-Transmitter in der Nähe von Computer verwenden. Dies ist dann ein Beispiel für "Near/Far" (Nah/Weit) Interferenzen und wird noch bestärkt dadurch, dass WiFi Produkte für den Endverbraucher eine sehr schwache Signalstärke haben. Wenn Ihr Line 6 Gerät sich innerhalb der Reichweite von 2 Metern zu Ihrem Computer befindet, kann dieses Problem auftauchen, besonders dann, wenn der WiFi Zugriffspunkt ein wenig weiter entfernt steht. Normalerweise können Sie dann einfach den Line 6 Transmitter weiter weg platzieren, was Ihr Problem lösen sollte. Benutzer eines Line 6 Systems mit 12 Kanälen sollten Ihren transmitter auf "low power" stellen, was das Problem dann auch behebt. Empfohlene Kanaleinstellungen um Interferenzen zu vermeiden: Was genau heißt das Near/Far? Die Near/Far Interferenzen sind bei Funksignalen sehr verbreitet, da diese entstehen, sobald ein starkes Signal einen Empfänger sozusagen "einnimmt", was es sehr schwer macht für den Empfänger ein schwächeres Signal zu entschlüsseln. Stellen Sie sich einfach eine Konversation in einem ruhigen Raum vor. Sie sind 6 Meter von Ihrem Gesprächspartner entfernt und können sich eigentlich ohne die Lautstärke zu heben mit diesem unterhalten. Wenn Sie diese Konversation nun in eine laute Umgebung verlegen, in der viele Gespräche rund um Sie herum stattfinden, wird es sehr schwer sich zu unterhalten ohne anfangen zu müssen zu schreien. So ähnlich geschieht es mit dem Funksignel, da der Transmitter nicht die Möglichkeit hat seine Signalstärke zu erhöhen, kann es sehr gut sein, dass ein näherer transmitter dies unterbricht. In der Realität ist das Problem in den meisten Fällen schnell zu lösen. Sie sollten es vermeiden näher als 1 Meter zum Empfänger zu sein, der nicht auf Ihrem Kanal ist, wenn der Transmitter der eigentlich mit disem Empfänger verbunden sein soll sich weiter als 15 Meter von diesem befinden. Wenn das eine regelmäßige Anforderung für System sein sollten, müssen Sie wahrscheinlich Ihre Antennen verlängern. (G50, G90 XD-V70) 2,4GHz Wireless F.A.Q. Pourquoi est-ce que la jauge de batterie est plus haute si je redémarre que si j'éteins le transmetteur? Les transmetteurs sans fil 2,4GHz de Line 6 les émetteurs comportent un dispositif qui mesure la tension des piles en temps réel et transmet ces données aux jauges de batterie dans les récepteurs. Les jauges de batterie deviennent très précises si ils ont été en cours d'exécution sans interruption depuis nouvelles batteries ont été installées dans l'émetteur et si le transmetteur n'pas été éteints et allumé. Mais à cause de la naturel chimique des batteries Alcaline, si ils ont étés éteints, la tension commence à "rebondir" et la tension augmente en comparaison avec la valeur de tension pendant être éteint. Malheureusement, cela ne durera pas longtemps et il revient à la valeur vraie après plus ou moins vingt minutes. Pour cette raison, lorsque vous allumez un émetteur qui a été exécuté avant, l'appareil donnera une tension élevée qui tombe rapidement au cours des premières minutes et continue de diminuer rapidement au cours des prochaines minutes. Ce comportement est normal pour les batteries Alcalines. Est-ce que USB 3.0 crée des interférences dans la gamme de fréquences 2,4 GHz? Les câbles et périphériques USB 3.0 sont connus pour émettre des interférences de fréquence radio dans la bande 2,4 GHz, que cause une gamme et/ou performance des appareils 2.4 GHz réduite dans la proximité. (Y inclus sont les claviers ou souris sans fil, WiFi, etc.) Nous recommandons de placer le récepteur sans fil numérique au moins 2 mètres loin des appareils USB 3.0 et ses câbles. Voici un lien vers une étude réalisée par Intel au sujet de cette interférence: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html Pourquoi est-ce que mon WiFi ralentit si je place mon émetteur près de mon ordinateur? WiFi et les produits sans fils Line 6 partagent la même bande passante, certains utilisateurs peuvent rencontrer un ralentissement de du WiFi à cause du placement du microphone ou des émetteurs d'instruments près ordinateurs. Ceci est un exemple d'un problème d'interférence "Near/Far" (près/loin) et est renforcé parce que les appareils WiFi consommateurs ont une puissance très faible. Si le transmetteur Line 6 est très proche (moins que 2 mètres) de votre ordinateur sans fil, vous pouvez rencontrer de cette situation, surtout si votre point d'accès WiFi est un peu plus loin. Normalement, si vous déplacer le transmetteur Line 6 plus loin de votre ordinateur, sa résous le problème. Les utilisateurs des systèmes Line 6 avec 12 canaux doivent mettre les émetteurs sur la configuration "low power". Ca résous le problème également. Configurations suggérés de canaux pour éviter des interférences WiFi: Qu'est-ce que le "Near/Far"? Le problème d'interférence Near/Far est commun pour les systèmes radio et se produit, si un signal fort capture un récepteur, s'est très difficile pour le récepteur de décoder le signal plus faible. Imaginez une conversation dans une chambre tranquille avec une personne 6 mètres plus loin. Il est probable que vous pouvez avoir une conversation avec des niveaux de voix normale. Si vous passez à un environnement plus bruyant, avec beaucoup de voix autour de vous, vos oreilles il peut être très difficile pour la conversation de continuer avec votre ami de longue distance sans crier. Un cas très similaire se produit pour les radios et puisque l'émetteur de longue distance est incapable d'augmenter sa puissance, probablement émetteur un très proche interrompre. En réalité, c'est principalement un problème résoluble. Vous devez éviter d'être plus proche qu'un mètre du récepteur qui n'est pas sur votre canal si l'émetteur destiné est plus loin que 15 mètres de ce récepteur. S'il s'agit d'une condition régulière, vous aurez besoin d'éloigner vos antennes. (G50, G90 XD-V70).
  11. Deutsch Français Q: Where do I get a Relay G30 Series Wireless System for use in the US? A: The Relay G30 is available at all authorized Line 6 dealers. To locate a dealer near you, please see our Dealer Finder. Q: Does USB 3.0 create interference in the 2.4GHz frequency range? A: USB 3.0 computer cables and peripherals, including hard drives, are known to emit radio frequency interference throughout the 2.4GHz band, which results in reduced range and/or performance for any 2.4GHz device in its proximity (including wireless keyboard or mouse, WiFi, etc.). We recommend placing any digital wireless receivers at least two meters away from the USB 3.0 device and its cabling. Below is a link to a study by Intel regarding this interference. http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html Q: Where can I purchase replacement Relay G30 transmitters (TBP06) or receivers (RXS06)? A: You can order them from any authorized dealer. Q: What are the specs on the provided Relay G30 Series power supply (DC-1G)? A: 9.6V DC, 500mA, pin center negative.? See the following link for more power supply FAQs: Power Supply, Amp Power and Battery F.A.Q. Q: Can I use a Voodoo Lab Pedal Power Plus 2 to power the Relay G30 receiver? A: Yes, but you will need to use the Voodoo lab "doubler" cable and you will need to use any two outputs of the Pedal Power Plus set to the "normal" position. See the following link for more information on the "doubler" cable available from Voodoo Lab: Voodoo Lab cables Q: What type of cable do I need between my guitar & Relay G30 (TBP06) transmitter? A: Any mono (tip-sleeve) instrument cable will work for both the instrument to the transmitter and the receiver output. We do not recommend using TRS ("stereo") instrument cables. Q: If you leave the transmitter cable plugged but turn the power off on the transmitter, does the cable still use up battery life even if the transmitter is powered off? Similar to some analog stomp boxes? A: When the power is switched off, the audio input has no bearing on battery draw, cable in or out. Q: Is the Relay G30 (TBP06) transmitter compatible with the X2 receiver (or vice versa)? A: Both systems run in completely different frequency ranges so they are not compatible with each other, but X2 and Relay units can be used on the same stage (along with any other analog wireless systems) with no problems. Q: I'm a harmonica player and would like to use the G30 with a bullet microphone (high impedance and high output). Its output peaks at approximately 3V to 4V. Will there be clipping or distortion of the output? A: No problem with either impedance or input level. The Relay transmitters (TBP06 and TBP12) will handle 6V inputs. Q: What is the output impedance of the RXS06 Receiver ? A: The output impedance of the RXS06 Receiver is 200 ohms. Q: How do I register my Relay G30 System? A: You can register on your account: Gear Registration LED States: TBP06 BATT: Blue: On Red: Low battery Purple: On channel change AUDIO: Green: Signal at input Orange: On power / channel change. RXS06 POWER: Blue: On AUDIO: Green: Signal at receiver input Transmitter Status: Top: Signal Strength Bot: Tx Battery Life F.A.Q.: G30 Wireless: Où est-ce que je peux acheter un système sans fil Relay G30 en France/Belgique? Le Relay G30 est disponible à tous les revendeurs Line 6 autorisés. Utilisez ce lien pour trouver un distributeur près de chez vous: Dealer Finder Est-ce que USB 3.0 crée des interférences dans la gamme de fréquences 2,4 GHz? Les câbles et périphériques USB 3.0 sont connus pour émettre des interférences de fréquence radio dans la bande 2,4 GHz, que cause une gamme et/ou performance des appareils 2.4 GHz réduite dans la proximité. (Y inclus sont les claviers ou souris sans fil, WiFi, etc.) Nous recommandons de placer le récepteur sans fil numérique au moins 2 mètres loin des appareils USB 3.0 et ses câbles. Voici un lien vers une étude réalisée par Intel au sujet de cette interférence: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html Où est-ce que je peux acheter des Relay G30 émetteurs (TBP06) ou récepteurs (RXX06) de remplacement? Vous les pouvez commander de n'importe quel distributeur autorisé. Quels sont les spécifications d'alimentation fournie avec la série Relay G30 ? (DC-1G) 9,6V DC, 500mA avec broche centrale négative. Visitez ce site pour plus d'informations concernant les alimentations: Power Supply, Amp Power and Battery F.A.Q. Est-ce que je peux utiliser un Voodoo Lab Pedal Power Plus 2 pour allumer le récepteur Relay G30? Oui mais vous devez utiliser le câble Voodoo Lab "doubler" et deux sorties du Pedal Power Plus sur la position "normal". Visitez le lien suivant pour plus d'informations sur les câbles "doubler" disponibles de Voodoo Lab: Câbles Voodoo Lab Quel type de câble est-ce que j'ai besoin pour connecter ma guitare et mon transmetteur Relay G30 (TBP06)? N'importe quel câble instrument mono (TS) fonctionnera pour la connexion de l'instrument à l'émetteur et à la sortie du récepteur. Nous ne recommandons pas l'utilisation d'un câble instrument stéréo (TRS). Si vous laissez le câble instrument branché mais éteignez le transmetteur, est-ce que le câble toujours utilise la batterie même si l'émetteur est éteint? Comme pour quelques pédales d'effets analogues? Si le transmetteur est éteint, l'entrée audio n'a pas d'incidence sur la batterie, avec ou sans câble. Est-ce que le transmetteur Relay G30 (TBP06) est compatible avec le récepteur X2 ou inversement? Les deux systèmes utilisent des gammes de fréquences complètement différentes donc ils ne sont pas compatibles MAIS les deux peuvent être utilisés dans la même scène (avec autres systèmes sans fils analogues) sans problèmes. Je suis un harmoniciste et je voudrais bien utiliser le G30 avec un micro harmonica (impédance et sorite haute). Sortie d'environ 3V à 4V. Est qu'il y aura du clipping ou de la distorsion du signal de sortie? Pas de problème ni avec l'impédance ou niveau d'entrée. Les transmetteurs Relay (TBP06 et TBP12) peuvent traiter des entrées de 6V. Quel est l'impédance de sortie du récepteur RXS06? L'impédance de sortie du récepteurs RXS06 est 200 Ohms. Comment est-ce que je peux enregistrer mon système Relay G30? Vous le pouvez enregistrer ici: Enregistrement Line 6. États LED: TBP06: BATT: Bleu: Allumé. Rouge: Batterie faible. Violet: Changement de canal. AUDIO: Vert: Signal à l'entrée. Orange: Allumé et changement de canal. RXS06: POWER: Bleu: Allumé. AUDIO: Vert: Signal à la sortie. État du transmetteur: En haut: Puissance du signal. En bas: Vie de la pile. F.A.Q. zum Relay G30 Wireless: Wo bekomme ich ein Relay G30 Wireless System in Deutschland her? Das Relay G30 ist bei allen autorisierten Line 6 Händlern erhältlich. Um einen Händler is Ihrer Nähe zu finden klicken Sie auf diesen Link: www.de.line6.com/dealers/ Entstehen Interferenzen durch USB 3.0 im 2,4GHz Frequenzbereich? USB 3.0 Computerkabel und –geräte sind dafür bekannt Interferenzen bei Radio Frequenzen im 2,4GHz Bereich zu erzeugen was zu verringerter Reichweite und Performance für alle 2.4GHz Geräte (inklusive kabellose Tastatur oder Maus sowie WiFi und viele andere) in der Nähe führen kann. Wir empfehlen alle digitalen Kabellosempfänger mindestens 2m von den USB 3.0 Geräten und deren Verkablung weit weg zu plazieren. Nachstehend können Sie einen Link zur Untersuchung von Intel über Interferenzen mit USB 3.0 finden: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html Wo kann ich Ersatztransmitter (TBP06) oder –empfänger (RXS06) kaufen? Sie können diese bei autorisierten Händlern erwerben. Was sind die technischen Daten zum Netzteil der Relay G30 Serie (DC-1G)? 9,6V Gleichstrom (DC), 500mA, negativer Zentralpol. Klicken Sie auf den folgenden Link für weitere Informationen über Netzteile zu erhalten: Power Supply, Amp Power and Battery F.A.Q. Kann ich ein Voodoo Lab Pedal Power Plus 2 benutzten um den Relay G30 Empfänger zu betreiben? Ja, aber dazu brauchen Sie ein Voodoo Lab "doubler" Kabel und Sie müssen zwei der Ausgänge des Pedal Power Plus verwenden, die auf "normal" eingestellt sind. Klicken Sie auf den folgenden Link um mehr Informationen über "doubler" Kabbel von Voodoo Labs zu erhalten: Voodoo Lab Kabel Welche Art Kabel brauche ich zwischen meiner Gitarre und dem Relay G30 Transmitter (TBP06)? Irgend ein Mono (TS) Instrumentkabel wird funktionieren für die Verbindung von Instrument zu Transmitter und zu Empfänger-Ausgang. Wir raten davon ab ein Stereo (TRS) Instrument-Kabel zu benutzen. Wenn man das Transmitterkabel stecken lässt aber den Transmitter selbst abschaltet, verbraucht das Kabel dann weiterhin Batterielaufzeit obwohl der Transmitter aus ist? So wie bei manchen analogen Effektpedalen? Wenn das Gerät abgeschaltet ist, dann hat das Kabel keine Einfluss auf die Batterielaufzeit ob das Kabel steckt oder nicht. Ist der Relay G30 Transmitter (TBP06) kompatibel mit X2 Empfängern, bzw. umgekehrt? Beide Systeme laufen in vollkommen anderen Frequenzbereichen und sind somit nicht komaptibel, Sie können Sie jedoch ohne Probleme (mit anderen analogen kabellosen Systemen) auf der selben Bühne benutzen. Ich bin ein Harmonikaspieler und würde gerne das G30 mit einem Kugelmikrofon benutzen (hohe Impedanz und Ausgang). Der Ausgang befindet sich da höchstens bei ca. 3V oder 4V. Wird dies zu Übersteuerung oder Verzerrung am Asugang führen? Nein, weder Impadanz noch Eingangspegel sind hier ein Problem. Die Relay Transmitter (TBP06 und TBP12) kommen mit Eingängen von bis zu 6V klar. Was ist die Ausgangsimpedanz des RXS06 Empfängers? Die Ausgangsimpedanz des Empfängers beträgt 200 Ohm. Wie kann ich mein Relay G30 System registrieren? Line 6 Produkte können über das Benutzerkonto auf de.line6.com registriert werden. http://de.line6.com/account/registergear/ LED Zustand: TBP06: BATT: Blau: An. Rot: Niedriger Batteriestand. Violet: Auf Kanalwechsel. AUDIO: Grün: Signal am Eingang. Orange: An und auf Kanalwechsel. RXS06: POWER: Blau: An. AUDIO: Grün: Signal am Empfängereingang. Transmitter-Status: Oben: Signalstärke. Unten: Batterielaufzeit.
  12. Q: I am making a replacement cable for my Line 6 wireless unit - How should I wire the cable? A: Here is the wiring from the 1/8" TRS jack to the 1/4" mono plug: Tip and Sleeve from the 1/8" jack go to the 1/4" Sleeve (ground), the Ring on the 1/8" TRS jack goes to the Tip (Hot) of the 1/4" jack. Q: Is there any way to make an external antenna for the XDS95 or is it even necessary? A: The antennae are built into the chassis of the XDS95 and perform quite well. Therefore there is no need for external antennae. Q: The belt clip seems to easily fall off my strap with the slightest jumping around. How can I avoid this? A: Thin straps are typically the culprit. Weaving your guitar strap through the clip will help to ensure a secure fit. Q: I would like to buy multiple transmitters. Where can I find them? A: Please see a list of our dealers on our authorized dealers page. Any of our dealers can order additional available accessories if they are out of stock. Q: Do you offer replacement and or extra cables? Do you also offer an angled plugged cable? A: See the following link for the replacement cable on the Line 6 webstore: Line 6 Store: X2 Replacement Cable X2 Digital Wireless Systems & componants System Comparison Chart XDS95: XDR1 + XDT1 XDS-PLUS: XDR2 + XDT4 XDR95x: XDR4 + XDT4 XDR952: Omni Lav Mic XDR953: Headset Mic XDR954: Cardiod Lav Mic XDR955: Handheld Mic XDR957: Horn Mic XDR vs XDS Mode -In XDR the Q-diversity Plus feature is active to minmize signal dropouts as well as to provide a better frequency response: 10 Hz - 20 kHz +/- .5 dB -In XDS mode the frequency response is 10hz - 12khz
  13. Q: If the Line 6 digital wireless systems can accommodate an active bass guitar, will I lose any low end? A: The Line 6 digital wireless system will work great with active and passive electronics. Line 6 digital wireless systems do not compand (compress then expand) the broadcast signal like analog systems do, so there is no loss of low end. Line 6 systems simply allow the instruments true signal (whether hot or mild) to pass through to the amp. The frequency range for Line 6 systems goes down to 10Hz, allowing for amazing lows when tuning down or using a bass with a low B string. Q: How do I connect to a “full frequency” output on my Line 6 digital wireless system? A: You can access full frequency output by connecting the receiver output cable to the first ring of the TRS output jack. Ideally, this would be done with a special cable (insert cables (a type of “Y” cable) are a great choice and have ¼ TRS on one end and two separate ¼ mono cables on the other end). This also allows you to split the signal by connecting your receiver to two different signal paths (a great way to get a “tuner out” feed or go to a separate amplifier, recording device or mixer). In a pinch, you can access the ring output by plugging a mono ¼” cable half way in though we don’t recommend this for performance applications due to the cable not being fully engaged into the jack socket. Q: Why isn’t “full frequency” the default output choice? A: A standard ¼” instrument cable gently rolls off the high frequencies around 8 KHz. This is due to the capacitance of the wire and is a scenario that most musicians have grown used to. As the criteria for Line 6 digital wireless is to simply replace the cable, we chose to mimic the performance of a direct wire connection. Since we eliminate several feet of cable (and its associated capacitance), the net result was a system that performed exactly as if a musician was plugged in with a three foot patch cord, resulting in a noticeably clearer and brighter high frequency response. In order to not turn off musicians with increased high frequency response, we added the capacitance back into the signal path so that the end result was “cable gone – sound identical”. However, we really loved the increased high frequency response. Why? 1. More clarity and articulation (the reason for new strings when we record or gig, right?) 2. Phase coherency: If you boost the highs on your amp (or FX devices) you are actually adding a complex phase shift to your signal. With the Line 6 digital wireless system, you get more clarity with complete phase coherency (no phase shifting) and this really makes a big difference. 3. No boost in hiss or noise floor: Again, when you increase the highs on your amp (or FX devices), you also get an increase in hiss and noise. With the Line 6 digital wireless system, you get all of the clarity for free, meaning that there is no increase in hiss and noise (and again, no phase shift). Full bandwidth is available full time on the XLR output (as it should). Q: Would this work with a lav or headset microphone for videographer applications? A: Technically, yes. However, the frequency response of the receiver is tailored to musical instruments (10Hz – 12 KHz in full-bandwidth mode) meaning that for microphone applications, there may not be enough high frequency content when using the portable XDR1 stompbox receiver. Additionally, to access the full-bandwidth, the operator will need to utilize an insert cable (TRS to dual ¼ mono) or custom wired cable that connects the first ring of a TRS cable to the input of the next component/camera. Q: Can my XDT1/XDT4 transmitter provide phantom power to my condenser mic? A: Only the XDT4 transmitter can provide phantom power to a condenser microphone. It provides ~9v bias voltage at the tip for use with lavaliere microphones. Q: Can I connect the XLR output of my XDR4 Receiver into a mixing board with global phantom power? A: Yes, there is a resistor to protect the XDR4 Receiver from being damaged by phantom power voltage, but it is not guaranteed. Some older mixing boards from the 70's could in theory overwhelm the device depending on just how much phantom power is supplied. Q: Can I use multiple receivers with the same transmitter? A: Yes, as long as the receivers are set to the same channel and mode that the transmitter is set to. Q: Can I use multiple transmitters with the same receiver? A: You cannot use multiple transmitters AT THE SAME TIME with the same receiver as that could cause interference with each other. You can use more than one transmitter with a receiver, but only one transmitter can be powered on at a time. - Do keep the antenna clear of obstructions as much as possible - Do keep line-of-sight for maximum range - Don’t place operating transmitters near the receivers (within 3 – 5 feet). This will potentially overload the internal RF amplifiers of the receiver units and cause limited range. Practical Operating Tips For multiple users, Do consider the best placement of receivers for optimal performance. Avoid having one performer with a bodypack transmitter “ON” stand in front of a rack of receivers. This will limit the overall operating range of the furthest performer(s). One example might be a rack of receivers at the monitor position and performers often stand right next to the rack of receivers. This can become an issue the more channels you are operating. Quite often, one of the artists is also the sound person. Rather, place the receivers at a location that allows the freedom of artist/engineer movement without having “ON” transmitters get within 3-5 feet. Operating Modes It is important to have the components operating in XDR mode for optimum performance. XDR mode is the proprietary “anti-jamming” RF mode that utilizes a dual digital broadcast. To confirm that the XDR4 rackmount receiver is in XDR mode, make certain that the “MODE” LED is glowing green. If it is not, power off the receiver and power it back on while holding the “CHANNEL DOWN” button. The XDT4 transmitter should also be in XDR mode. This can be confirmed by powering on the transmitter and watching the LED power on sequence. If all LEDs glow BLUE and then a single RED LED moves through in a LEFT, RIGHT, LEFT pattern settling into Battery/Channel mode then you are certain that this transmitter is in XDR mode. If the LEDs glow BLUE and then expand out from the center LED (BLUE then RED) before settling into Battery/Channel mode then this transmitter is in XDS mode. To change modes on the transmitter, power off the unit and power it on while holding the “CHANNEL” button. Monitor the LED sequence to confirm mode. Another simple way to confirm transmitter operating mode is to monitor the color of the LEDs when audio signal is present. If the LEDs display audio in BLUE you can be certain that the transmitter is in XDR mode. If however, the audio display is in RED then you will need to change to mode. XDR mode works incredibly well. If your systems are operating in XDS mode then you will enjoy a great enhancement of overall system performance by switching back to the XDR mode. Q: What is the maximum AC signal input voltage that the transmitter can handle? A: It will accommodate a very large signal (about 6V peak to peak) without any clipping. We have had users with active pickups using (2) 9V batteries with no problems. The dual 9V's usually allow the circuitry for the pickup to operate without degradation while the batteries discharge. It is not actually outputting 9V it is more like +-5V peak at most. Otherwise the unit would distort as the battery dies.
  14. Parts Q: My X2 cable is lost/damaged. Where can I purchase a replacement? Line 6 Store: X2 Replacement Cable Q: I lost/broke an antenna on my X2 wireless receiver. How can I get a replacement? A:The X2 series uses a 900 mhz, ½ wave-BNC antenna. These antenna can be purchased from numerous audio-video or musical instrument retailers. Q: Why is my signal occasionally cutting out? A: Please check to see that your locking cable connector is screwed in tightly to the input jack on the transmitter. If not, this can cause your unit to either not get audio at all or cause the signal to cut in and out. Please see our updated manual on this website for a detailed diagram of the proper connection process. Troubleshooting The XDR4 rackmount receiver has an “RF” LED indicator on the front panel. With all transmitters powered “OFF”, scroll through the 5 channels on the receiver while viewing the “RF” LED. If this LED remains dark, then you can conclude that there is no undesired RF at your current location. If it lights RED, then there is RF on that channel. This typically does not lead to the conclusion that you cannot operate on that channel. It does indicate that there is RF present and that the range might be limited on that channel. “Drop outs” are often the cause of a bad audio connection. This can happen when the input jack is not fastened securely or when the input cable has broken down at the connector. You can visually confirm a solid “digital link” even without an audio input by powering on only one transmitter and receiver and monitor the 4 green “RECEIVER” LEDs on the XDR4 rackmount receiver. As long as one single green LED stays lit, then you have a solid link. I would confidently say that the system is working well if all 4 LEDs stay lit no matter where you go out to at least 100’ with little or no “dancing”. When they start to consistently dance you are approaching the outer edge of the operating range. This test is best performed with two people. Q: Power is on but no signal or there is an intermittent signal with sound cutting out with the XDS95, XDR95 or XDSPlus transmitter A: How far away from each other are the transmitter and receiver? You may simply just need to return to operational range. If the issue persists, you will need to replace the XC1 cable. Q: Power is on but no signal is getting to XDR95, XDS95, or XDSPlus Receiver. A: Remember to set the receiver to the correct mode and to set both the transmitter and receiver to the same channel. If you continue to have issues, replace the XC1 cable. Q: My XDS95 receiver / transmitter shuts down shortly after powering up A: If you are using batteries, try using a new set of batteries. If you are using rechargeable batteries, try a fresh set of alkaline batteries. If these issues persist, the XDS95 needs to be serviced. Q: My transmitter suddenly started producing a distorted broken up signal A: Replacing the XC1 cable would be the first thing to try, but if that does not fix the issue, the transmitter must be serviced for repair. Q: I have a buzzing noise on all channels of my receiver. A: First, make sure that the receiver is getting the proper amount of power from a compatible power supply, especially if the power is being shared with other devices. If you have active electronics on your guitar, make sure that the batteries in the guitar are fresh and power the guitar. If not, replace the batteries. Check your guitar jack to see if it is loose or shorting out and fix the jack as needed. Lastly, please remove/turn off any sources of magnetism (such as a computer monitor) that is close to the transmitter as this could be producing the noise in the signal. Q: I can only go 25 to 30 ft with my XDS95 before it drops out? A: If there is another transmitter on and set to the same channel nearby, then you would need to change the channel on the second transmitter. If there is another source of RF between your transmitter and the receiver, then you would need to move the source of RF. As a last resort, you can open up the back of your receiver and you should see 2 thick black wires soldered onto the antennas. If these wires are not soldered properly, the receiver needs to be serviced for repair. The following is a list of symptoms in which your Digital Wireless device must be serviced for repair: Symptom: I hear a "click" every once in a while when my XDS95 system is on but I am not playing? Symptom: One of the green receiving section lights does not come on even when the XDR95 transmitter is right next to the receiver. Symptom: When I power up my unit, all the lights stay on (Red or Blue) and then I cannot turn the unit off. Symptom: My XDT1/XDT4 transmitter burns up a fresh battery in 1 hour. Symptom: My XDS95 receiver does not power up with a 9v battery but it will power up on a power cord adapter. Symptom: My X2 transmitter does not power up with a 9v battery.
  15. Q: How much battery life should I expect with my XDR95 transmitter? A: During our in-house testing of alkaline battery performance, Kirkland, Energizer and Ray-O-Vac brands showed the best results. There are various test results available online that confirm this information. You should also be aware that there are black-market knock-offs out there that look “real” but fall short of the original manufacturer’s specifications. Line 6 digital wireless products now include Energizer batteries as others have not been performing up to spec. That being said, you should expect the battery life in the XDT4 to be between 5.5 and 6.5 Hours. Digital wireless technology has its own set of power demands, but as we develop products, we keep in mind the need for power efficiency. There is a big difference between 10 hours and 5 hours, but please remember the sound quality and benefits of the Line 6 digital system when compared to analog wireless. Q: Is the battery used in the receiver of the XDS95 overridden when using the AC adaptor input? A: In the current design, the battery is not overridden. What this means, is that if you plug in a power adapter to the XDS95 while there are working batteries in the receiver, the battery life will be drained in that configuration. Just make sure to remove the batteries if you are using a power adapter with the receiver. Q: Can I use rechargeable batteries with my Line 6 digital wireless system? A: Yes, but the specs on rechargeable batteries is all over the map and changes every time a battery is charged and discharged. In order to create and offer consistency, we have designed Line 6 digital wireless products to be used with standard 9V alkaline batteries. This way, we can predict and report battery life remaining with accuracy and translate that data to the battery meters that are included on Line 6 digital wireless components. Our knowledge of how consistently rechargeable batteries will work with the Line 6 digital wireless systems is limited. The rule of thumb is: As the battery remains above 6.2 V, it will continue to function. You may want to contact the battery manufacturer for further details. Q: What power supply should I use for the XDS-95 system? A: The Line 6 DC-1/DC1-G power supply will correctly power the XDS-95 system. Q: What power supply should I use for the XDS-plus or XDR95 system? A: the Condor 500ma power supply (supplied with the unit) or Line 6 DC1-G will power either the XDR Plus or XDR95 systems. Q: Where can I find more information on the power supply requirements and purchase a replacement/spare power supply? Power Supply, Amp Power and Battery F.A.Q. Q: Will my XDR95, XDS95 and XDSPlus work with 230/240 volt power? A: Yes, as long as the power transformer converts to 9V 500mA (For XDR95 & XDSPlus) and 9V 100mA (for XDS95) it will work. Our non-U.S. distributors sell 230V to 9V 500mA transformers. Q: I have a pedal board that distributes power to all my pedals. Can my XDS95 receiver share power with devices? A: Yes. Your XDS95 receiver only requires 9V 100mA, but the device will draw only what it needs. On pedal boards that share power with multiple devices, a device may not always get all the power that it needs. If power is being shared with other devices and you start experiencing any issues, dedicate power to the XDS95 and see if the issue goes away.
  16. Line6Tony

    Axsys/AX2 F.A.Q.s

    Note: The AX2 and Axsys amplifiers are discontinued and now listed as a Legacy Product. Application Q: Where can I get the presets for the AxSys amplifier? A: The Axsys presets are available in .JPG format and can be downloaded from the attached document at the botton of this document. Q: Which Line 6 controllers are compatable with the Axsys/AX2? A: The Line 6 Floorboard and the FB4. See the following link for more information: Line 6 Floorboard and FB4 F.A.Q. Q: Can the stomp box modelers be used with the AX2? Is there much duplication between the stomp boxes and the AX2 (ie, if they can be used together, am I opening up a whole new range of possibilities or just doubling up on functions I already have? A: Line 6 Stomp Boxes will work great with the AX2. The effects in the AX2 are completely different than the effects in the Stomp Boxes. The effects in the AX2 are for the most part just generic effects, where the effects in the Modelers are modeled after classic effect devices used by everyone from Hendrix to Van Halen. Q: How do I adjust my tuner reference frequency back to 440Hz? A: While in tuner mode, turn the MIDDLE knob on your amp or POD. This will allow you to select a tuning reference frequency anywhere from 436-445Hz. Q: How can I change the volume level of the tuner on my AX2/Axsys? A: While in tuner mode, simply turn the CHANNEL VOLUME knob to the desired level. This will set your tuner level without effecting the other channels of your AX2/Axsys. Q: It is possible to control the reverb level of the AX2 with the wah pedal of the Line6 floorboard? A: It is possible to control the reverb level of the AX2 with the wah pedal of the Line6 floorboard. There are several parameters of the AX2 User preset that must be adjusted properly for this to be implemented. Here are the settings: Reverb row / reverb level set to 0 Main row / Delay/reverb knob set to 90. Wah row / wah type set to 5.18. Wah row / wah depth set to 99. Increasing the Reverb row / reverb level setting will adjust the wah pedal minimum reverb level. Decreasing the Wah row / wah depth setting will adjust the wah pedal maximum reverb level. Q: How can I make my own personal patches? A: To make a custom set up of factory patches, simply call up the patch you want, hit "save" (the display will flash), then use the "Bank up/Down" and "Channel select" buttons to choose the location you want that patch to be in. (See pages 4*3, 5*10 and 9*1 in the AX2 manual) Q: What MIDI control functions can I access using the AX2? A: The AX2 Manual on Page 6.6 details the functions of the AX2 that may be assigned for continuous control by the Wah pedal. There is also an AX2 MIDI sysex document that details all of the functions that can be controlled using external MIDI controllers. Q: How can I get a good direct output from my AX2/Axsys? A: Unlike the Flextone, where the speaker compensation is done in the analog world, the AX2/Axsys cabinet emulation is done in the digital world. Because of this, when the speaker emualtion is on, it is going to be present in the direct outs as well as the speaker outs. For AX2/Axsys users, one solution can be to use a pair of analog boxes (like a Hughes & Kettner Red Box or a Digital Music Cab Tone Dual) to feed the PA in live situations and then use the AX2/Axsys compensated direct out for recording purposes only. There is another inexpensive and simple solution to the line out/speaker compensation issue. Many users find that when the speaker compensation is activated, the sound of the AX2/Axsys speaker is not objectionable but simply too dark (there needs to be more treble in the sound) while the amps direct out sounds great through the PA. It is possible to simply feed a little of the direct sound through your vocal monitor and then have some of the low end rolled off. You can achieve this by "Y'ing" the AX2/Axsys direct output into two mixer channel line inputs and using the second channel to EQ your personal monitor feed. This allows you to use the first mixer channel to send the full range AX2/Axsys direct sound through the main house sound system. Then, send the separately EQ'ed sound from the second mixer channel to your vocal monitor. The sound that comes through your vocal monitor is "tinny", but when it gets mixed in with the "bassy" sound of the AX2/Axsys speakers, the resulting sound is pretty well balanced. You may also find that there is also an added depth to the sound similar to running a bi-amped bass guitar rig. You can also apply this concept of Y'ing the direct out to connect to another amplifier other than your vocal monitor. You can use another combo amp or a "Hot Spot" type monitor. You may also find that adding external effects to the "monitor" feed gives you some extra sound processing possibilities. Q: It is possible to control the delay level of the AX2 with the wah pedal of the Line6 floorboard? A: There are several parameters of the AX2 User preset that must be adjusted properly for this to be implemented. Here are the settings: Delay row / delay level set to 0 Main row / Delay/reverb knob set to 90. Wah row / wah type set to 5.12. Wah row / wah depth set to 99. Increasing the Delay row / delay level setting will adjust the wah pedal minimum delay level. Decreasing the Wah row / wah depth setting will adjust the wah pedal maximum delay level. Set up Q: If I only run one speaker on the amp (AX2 212 upgrade) Will I still get the full stereo signal (i.e. the rhythm of the delay will be the same)? If I DI the AX with a mono cable into the PA will I also get stereo delay in a mono? A: You will get only 1/2 of the signal from the amp if you run one speaker. You will still get stereo out of the direct output. You will get mono out of the amp if you use a mono cable. It can be a complicated matter to run a direct output from an amplifier to a live sound system and simultaneously monitor that amplifier's internal speakers on stage. The issue of the cabinet emulation on the AX2 is somewhat more complex than it looks at first glance, since unlike the Flextone, where the speaker compensation is actually done in the analog world, on the AX2 it's done in the digital world and, because of hardware limitations, can't be both present (at the direct out) and not present (at the speakers) at the same time. To do so would require adding additional A/D conversion and a divergent data path, neither of which is a software solution, or an inexpensive, ungradable hardware change. The AX2 design was never intended to have both in simultaneous use. Was it a bad design decision? Maybe, but hindsight is always 20/20, and all of our products are being used in ways that transcend their original design, for good or ill. For AX2 users, one solution can be to use a pair of analog boxes (For example, I have a H&K Red Box and a Digital Music CabTone Dual-lok'd to the inside of my AX2 cabinet) to feed the PA in live situations and use the compensated direct out only for recording purposes. Not the most elegant solution, but a very usable and portable one. There is another cheap and simple solution to the line out/speaker compensation issue. Many users find that the sound of the AX2 speakers, when speaker compensation is activated, is not objectionable, but is simply too dark. There needs to be much more treble in the sound. The direct out sounds great through the PA. You can simply feed a little of the direct sound through your vocal monitor. Have the low end rolled off my personal monitor sound. (you can achieve this EQ setting by "Y'ing" the AX2 direct output into two mixer channel line inputs and using this second channel only to EQ your personal monitor feed). This allows you to use the first mixer channel to send the full range AX2 direct sound through the main house sound system and to other players' vocal monitors. Then, send the separately EQ'ed sound from the second mixer channel to your vocal monitor. The sound that comes through your vocal monitor is "tinny", but when it gets mixed in with the "bassy" sound of the AX2 speakers, the resulting sound is pretty well balanced. There is an added depth to the sound, similar to running a bi-amped bass guitar rig. We realize that this solution is not superior to having separate control of all AX2 amp outputs, but it works without having to spend the extra money on external speaker emulation devices. We hope this solution gives you one more option that may help you get a better monitor sound, in some situations. You may also be able to apply this concept of Y'ing the direct out to others amplifiers than your vocal monitor. You might be able to use another combo amp or a "Hot Spot" type monitor. You may also find that adding external effects to "monitor" feed gives some extra sound processing possibilities. Q: Can the AX2/Axsys power an external speaker cabinet? A: Yes, an external cabinet can be connected to the AX2/Axsys by disconnecting the existing Axsys speakers and connecting the extension cabinet. The speaker outputs of the AX2/Axsys must be connected to an 8ohm or 16ohm load. Do not use a 4ohm load, as it will cause the amp to overheat. Q: How do I record with the AX2/Axsys line out? A: The LINE OUT/HEADPHONE jack of the AX2/Axsys is a stereo output so we suggest that you use a "Stereo TRS" (Tip/Ring/Sleeve) jack to take advantage of the stereo output. A TRS jack is basically a stereo jack much like the jack on the end of your stereo headphones. You can use a mono or guitar cable in the LINE OUT/HEADPHONE output but you will only get one side of the stereo field. Set the Master Volume at 2-1/2 or lower to get a line level output that won't overdrive your mixer input. Remember that you can unplug the AX2 speakers when recording so that you don't have to have the amp playing in the room. If you need to have the amp playing in the room at a higher volume than 2-1/2, you may need to use an external 20 dB pad to bring the level of the signal going to the mixer back down to a usable level. See page 5*15 in the AX2 manual for more details Q: Can I adjust the STEREO LINE OUT/HEADPHONE level of my AX2/Axsys? A: In order to have the desired AX2/Axsys stage volume but not overdrive the input of the mixer, an external 20dB pad can be placed between the LINEOUT of the AX2/Axsys and the input of the mixer. Most mixing consoles already have a 20dB pad built in, but if necessary, an inexpensive outboard unit can be purchased. Rolls manufactures one called the DB25 Matchbox. It doubles as a direct box and a pad and should work great in this situation. Specifications Q: Is the Aux input on the AX2 unbalanced mono or stereo? A: The Aux input of the AX2 is unbalanced mono. The mono sound will be sent to both sides of the stereo output. Troubleshooting Q: How do I reset the Axsys/AX2? A: The factory reset for the Axsys 212 or AX2 is to hold down the USER PRESET and the SAVE (or STORE SOUND) buttons. Q: I have been getting a loud noise when switching from preset 01 on channel "A"? A: Please try a hard reset of your AX2/Axsys. Q: I am receiving a "lo batt" error message. What should I do? A: This message is an indication that the battery is not going to be with us much longer. We use lithium batteries in the AX2/Axsys in order to store the user presets, a common replacement is the Panasonic BR2325-1HG. The current battery will need to be de-soldered and replaced with a new battery. If you are not confident in doing this replacement, it should be performed by an authorized Line 6 Service Center. Q: I'm having a hard time getting my clean sounds really clean on my AxSys/AX2. Is there something that I can try? A: Always remember that there are many different places where you can increase or decrease gain on the AX2/AxSys. If you've chosen to increase it in all (or even most) of these places, you could be causing clipping after the TubeTone modeling. One of the most likely places for this to happen is in the Graphic EQ. A quick test is to turn the EQ off and see if your sound cleans up. If it does, move your whole EQ curve down so that your highest frequency boosts are no higher than +6. A general troubleshooting procedure to find where you might be getting unwanted clipping is to turn off all the effects, make sure that the sound is clean, then turn the effects back on, one at a time, checking for clipping after turning on each one. Q: I just upgraded to AX2 and my presets are changing radically every time I touch a knob. What's going on? A: The AX2 defaults to an 'immediate' editing mode in which the sound will instantly reflect the knob settings (i.e. when you change a knob, the sound changes immediately). You're used to the older 'capture' mode editing of the AxSys 212, where you had to move a knob to the position of its stored setting before you could change the setting. You can put the AX2 into the older editing mode by holding down the Main Row Edit Select button while powering up the amp. This setting is stored with the other Global settings, and you'll never have to think about it again unless you do a reset of the amp. (See page 2-2 of the manual) Q: I turned up the Delay/Reverb level in the Main Row, but I don't hear any reverb or delay? A: Make sure that the Delay and/or Reverb is turned on in the FX On/Off Edit Row or at the Floor Board. Still nothing? Remember that the individual Delay and Reverb Level controls in their respective Edit Rows have to be turned up as well. Q: The Axsys amplifier may make a crashing noise when switching between two presets that have Reverb or Delay on them? A: The Axsys amplifier may make a crashing noise when switching between two presets that have Reverb or Delay on them. The Axsys may also make a crashing noise when switching from a preset that uses the Acoustic Simulator to a preset that uses a non-Acoustic Simulator amp model with Reverb or Delay. There are several things that can be done to eliminate or minimize this noise. If the presets that are selected do not have any Reverb or Delay on them, the noise will be eliminated. It is possible to have Reverb or Delay pre-programmed into a preset but have the effects turned off. Then, after the preset has been selected using the EFFECTS ON/OFF foot switch function to activate the Reverb or Delay. This will eliminate switching noises at the time of the preset change. It is also possible to program the presets to minimize any noises that may occur during switching. The "SPRING" reverb model is the most likely to cause noises. Using another reverb model such as "DARK HALL" will lower the level of the noise. Maintaining a similar "reverb level" on the presets that are selected will also help to minimize this switching noise. There are three parameters that adjust the "reverb level" on the Axsys. The REVERB ON/OFF setting in the FX ON/OFF row, the REVERB LEVEL setting in the REVERB row and the REVERB/DELAY setting in the MAIN row. Q: Why is it that when the Axsys receives "MIDI program change messages", it will remain in the PRESET BANK or USER BANK it is set to at the time that the message is received? A: The Axsys will receive "MIDI program changes" via its MIDI IN jack and then follow with the preset changes outlined on page 10.4 of the Axsys owners manual. When the Axsys receives a "MIDI program change message" it will remain in the PRESET BANK or USER BANK it is set to at the time that the message is received. The Axsys will need to receive a "MIDI bank change message" in order to scroll to a different BANK. To toggle between the USER and PRESET BANKs, the user must press the USER/PRESET button on the front panel of the Axsys. Many MIDI foot controllers proceed their program change commands with bank change information. This is especially common in Roland controllers. This function will need to be defeated for these controllers to work properly with a Line6 product. Q: My amp seems to be malfunctioning and I have done the factory reset and checked the amp trouble shooting document. What can I do as an end user? Line 6 Amp Trouble Shooting Q: When I change to my acoustic simulator sound from a distortion I get a loud sound? A: That noise that you're hearing is the sound of the Reverb and/or Delay trailing off from the electric guitar amp model and being amplified by the acoustic model at the time you're making the switch. The acoustic models have a lot more gain applied to them than the electric models. This is done so that the level between the acoustic modeler and the electric modeler are more closely matched. To avoid that frying pan sound, you may need to compromise the Reverb and/or Delay on the electric sound; basically turn it off. You can either program the electric sound with no Reverb or Delay, or you can turn the Reverb and/or Delay off via the Floor Board a few seconds before you switch to the acoustic sound. You may have to experiment to see how long it takes for the Reverb/Delay to "finish" before it's safe to switch to acoustic. The "discharging" time will be different for different lengths of Reverbs and Delays. Q: Can I still get the AXSys/AX2 EPROM upgrade? A: No, as the AXsys/AX2 EPROM is no longer readily available on the commercial market. Q: Can I still get the AXSys/AX2 Line 6 cover? A: The offical Line 6 AXsys/AX2 cover is longer being produced, but you can get a cover from a third party at the following link: Cases And Covers Q: Where can I get replacement knobs/speakers/logos for my AxSys/AX2 amp? A: Please check the Line 6 Store. Q: Where can I download an AxSys/AX2 manual? A: Line 6 Manuals.
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