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Found 46 results

  1. First post here, any & all help is appreciated. Gear- JTV59, POD HD500X, (2) EV ELX 112P Variax is set to input 1, Mic is set to input 2, & I can go in to my powered monitors with either 1/4" or XLR. I could also go in to ONE of my monitors (1/4" or XLR) from my POD & "daisy chain" via the XLR "link" from one monitor to the next. I'm not concerned with having a stereo signal going to my monitors. My powered monitors are exactly as shown in the illustration attached, each having TWO (XLR or 1/4") inputs with their own independent volume controls & a master for overall. Any ideas on the best POD HD500X configuration/connections to allow me SEPARATE volume control of guitar & Mic on my monitors ? To pan, or not to pan in my POD mixer is also eluding me. Thnx for your help !
  2. Hello everyone. I know there are already a couple of threads with users reporting hiss and issues with XLR output to their board. In summary it appears this is mainly due to the board sending phantom power to the Helix. My ask to the community to help others is what is the recommended configuration for sending your Helix guitar signal "Mono" to a board for each condition below? Assumptions - 1. XLR Left Mono Out Conditions - 1. Board is sending Phantom Power to device (Phantom power can not be turned off) 2. Board is not sending Phantom Power Questions - 1. When should i use Mic level output versus Line level output?
  3. helllo my fellow man, definitely have been dying to create my first pod post and im already a year old user, procrastination is a harlot but uh this here sitiuation had to be brought up to the boys for this here noobeh. thanks aton. so here is my desired signal chain: ---PODHDPRO--crownXLS1500 rack'd amp--PeaveySP-2 600wPA speakers--- First question: shall i run the outputs of the pod hd into the crownXLS using balanced(XLR) or unbalanced(1/4) i plan to use the pa speaker for all around use, from band practice, to live, and to just me riffing off on myself. i want clarity like most and im playing an electric guitar with a back track from desktop btw... Second question: i also have a yamaha emx 640 6channel mixer i could put in the signal chain right after the power amp and then into pa speakers but honestly i have no clue if thats is useless or necessary..? (i have been using studio monitors when writing but im just tired of it sounding like runny shards when i plug into my spider iv combo amp or our other pa system for practice) Third question: would you guys recomend using an old arse pa like the peavey sp-2ti 600w for this setup or should i go with another rig setup approach. i always thought just my pod hd pro to pa system would do but apparently not but im not to sure on this point, so far im just following directions of a god-like guitarist friend of miine (refering to new power amp addition). id like to say the help would be for the greater good lol but i appreciate all who read this.
  4. tylerhen

    No sound to speakers from hd500x

    I just connected my new HD500X to my two studio monitors via XLR. I am getting no sound to the speakers. I can't find my headphone adapter so I can't test if audio is going out at all. Just to confirm, I don't need any device between my 500X and my speakers right? XLR cables go directly from pedal to speaker? Is there a setting on the 500X where I have to specify XLR instead of 1/4 line? I just went through the setup guide and found nothing. I just tested, 1/4 gives sound. XLR does not. Thanks for any help
  5. I cant get my head round this: I believe i have the amp outputs (via the mixer) panned both centre (see image) but the chorus effect is ONLY audible on the LEFT XLR out, unless i engage the "dynamics" effect which follows (which i understand sums to mono) then i can hear it on the right-XLR. I have input 2 disabled (set to variax) but changing it to "same as input1" makes no difference. Also inserting a mono-summing effect before the amp does not reveal the chorus effect on the right XLR out. I thought the summing and panning on the mixer (after the amp) would effectively run everything L+R equally. can anyone explain please. thanks
  6. hi I have a Variax 500 and it worked well with XPS-AB until now: XLR thru PA - 1/4" trhu a Marshall Amp. Recently, if I switch XLR to PA, it works well and the 1/4" signal is mute; but when I switch to 1/4" the sound thru the amp is good, but at the same time in the XLR signal (that goes thru the PA) there is a noise and not mute. Help! Frank
  7. thomasmadsen1

    POD HD 500x

    Hi guys! I just disconnected my POD 500X from my computer as the latency was unbearable. I think I'll try connecting my KRK 6's directly into it instead, but I noticed that the outputs on the POD are balanced whereas the inputs on the monitors are balanced for both XLR and TRS. Will this be a problem ? I've read somewhere that when monitoring from the balanced outputs on the POD, the volume gets really low unless you connect to an amp, but when using unbalanced directly it's quite allright for practising...? Just wondering what kinda cables I should head out to buy on monday - cheers for any advice :) -Thomas
  8. Hey there. I tried searching around for a topic that might help me resolve the issues I seem to be having,but everything I have tried seems to be failing. Im using Reaper with my UX2.I have a Seinheisse E825 S running in with an XLR using either Gearbox or PodFarm I was trying to run the channel in dry,as I want it sound as natural as possible as I have it mic'd up to my HD147,but when I record,the volume seems to be incredibly low on playback. Can anyone tell me if I might be doing something worng? I also seem to get latency issues through my headphones when playing. Im completely stumped,but if any other info is needed to help me get up and running (I'm kinda new to this,so I could even be wrong with some of the terminology Im using) I can provide it,and I'd be grateful for any help
  9. Hi there, I used to connect the unbalanced 1/4" OUT of my HD500X into the line input of my M-Audio M-Track. With this configuration I was able to adjust the gain one the soundcard linearly, using the whole stroke of the knob. Now I'm using the HD500X connected with the M-Track with the XLR balanced outputs and with this configuration the first 3/4 of the gain knob have no influence on the signal, only the last 1/4 daoes, and it's obviously very sensitive. I don't know if it's a soundcard issue or if there are differences in POD signal using balanced vs unbalanced outputs. Can anyone help me? Thanks in advance
  10. ianbougton

    Hd500 L6 Link No Sound

    Hi I have a POD HD500 running in to a Line 6 DT25 head. The HD500 is connected to the DT25 via the L6 link. The unit has worked perfectly fine for a few months until recently. During a gig the sound just cut out completely. After swapping different cables (XLR, guitar etc) the sound came back. When back home I tried to replicate the fault but everything worked fine once again. A few weeks later the same thing happened again and then the display on pedal went blank, lit up but no information displayed.I un-plugged the pedal and went direct in to the amp, it worked fine. The following night I had another gig, plugged my pedal in as normal and it worked fine! I've just come to plug my pedal in again but first did a factory reset and flashed the firmware (successfully). Now I'm getting no sound or control from my pedal to the amp. If I plug headphones in it's fine, if I go direct into the amp without the pedal it's fine. I know straight away someone is going to say use a DMX XLR rather than standard but I honestly can't see this being the problem as the unit has worked fine with this XLR for months until now, I have also tried various other high quality XLR cables and none work. DMX cables are hard to get hold of here without ordering on-line. I can't use the warranty as I purchased the unit second hand and don't have proof of purchase. Can anyone recommend a solution or at least how to open the unit up to see if there is a loose connection on the XLR output? PLEASE HELP, I have a gig tomorrow!!! Ian
  11. rye715

    XLRs with HD500x

    Hi guys. I'll be gigging with HD500x on an XLR setup to be connected via the PA/Mixing Console. Sadly, I only have a single XLR cable that I connect as Left XLR Output. Will this suffice or will there be setbacks? Do you recommend that I use 2 XLRs instead just to maximize the HD500x? What other recommendations or tips can you suggest in using XLRs-to-PA setup with HD500x? Thanks.
  12. I dug up my old Silver Eagle D-104 microphone, put a new battery in it and wired it up for an XLR. Then I connected it my X3 Pro, cranked it up and it sounded great. Anyone else using vintage microphones with these devices?
  13. drpaneas

    Pod Hd300 Speakers

    Hello guys, I own a Line6 POD HD300. I always play at home, at bedroom levels using my headphones connected at the phones input of the POD. Now, I would like to use some speakers in order to share my sound with others who are in the same room. Unfortunately, I only have headphones... no amp and no speakers... that being said, I think it's time to buy some speakers. I see that the POD HD300 has 2 options: XLR for balanced 1/4 jacks for unbalanced What should I buy? Which is better? Please note, I have no other equipment (no PA, no DI) and I am not going serious about spending a lot of money. All I want is to play guitar in my room without headphones, simple as that. My budget is 200 Euro. I did some research and I found these: Neusonik NE05 - 139 Euro ESI nEar05 - 175 Euro many people recommend KRK RP5 Rokit G3, but they are quite expensive for me. Should I buy just one single KRK RP5 RoKit G3 or MONO doesn't worth it? Thank you in advance for your time and suggestions Panos
  14. RemoWilliams

    Pod X3 Live Studio Direct Outs

    I have a Pod X3 Live which I am using to record guitar. My Setup is Guitar > X3 Live > XLR outs > XLR IN on a Focusrite Scarlett 2i4. The thing is I'm having trouble finding the correct setting for the XLR ins on the Scarlett. The Scarlett has an instrument/line switch for each of it's XLR inputs. So I guess my question is, are the XLR outs on the Pod X3 live line level or instrument level? Currently I have the Scarlett set to line level and it sounds fine but if there is a possibility for improvement I would like to know. Thanks
  15. fr2632

    Hd500x - Jacks Vs Xlr Cables ?

    Hey guys, Question: what is the different between the jacks and XLR cable ? I have a mixer connected to the PC but I was wondering the difference between those two connections. Has XLR better quality or something ? Can I connect my HD500X to the mixer with those cables ? Thank you in advance. fr2632
  16. Hi Folks, I want to use the HD500 as Soundcard/Interface for Cubase editing and monitoring but can't get any sound from the connected studio monitors. Hope you got an idea what I'm doing wrong! My POD inputs Cubase to POD via USB Variax to POD via Digital Cabel Keyboard Line out to POD AUX in My POD Outputs XLR out L&R to Adam F5 Studio Monitors Headphones on Phones out I ran the obove setup without the monitors up untill now and had no issues. Editing, playback, recording all works fine. Now to get rid of the headphone only setup I took one of the new studio monitors out of the box and connected it to one XLR balanced out but have no sound at all! I tried POD sound through Headphones => works Connecting the monitor to the Latops headphone out via 3,5" Klinke to RCA => works, so the monitor is ok. Changing XLR cabels didn't change anything => cable should be fine too Flipped through all POD setup options I could but found no mute/balance/setup options for XLR out => No clue if I missed something. If anybody has an idea what I'm missing I'd be very happy! THX
  17. I have been using my POD Studio UX1 to record electric guitar DI with great success (or at least with very few technical issues) for the past few years. More recently I have ventured into the scary world of recording acoustic guitar and vocals. For this I have been using a rather low-budget dynamic microphone (Superlux TOP-258) running into the UX1 XLR input. It has always frustrated me that I cannot seem to get sufficient gain when recording my acoustic guitar this way. I have cranked the mic gain rotary nob all the way, hit the +18db boost button in POD farm, etc. I previously used Cubase to record, but have since switched to Cockos Reaper. Needless to say, the low mic gain issue persisted despite the DAW switch. Suspecting that the low gain might have something to do with my low-budget mic, I decided to invest in a Shure SM57 (the fact that I use the word "invest" in this context should give you a clear indication of my budget...), hoping that results would improve. To my dismay, however, the low mic gain issue not only remains unsolved, but actually seems worse with the SM57 than the Superlux mic. I feel somewhat at a loose end. I have seen reviews of the SM57 where it is plugged directly into some USB audio interface (just like I do with my UX1) and the artists manage to record acoustic guitar with tons of gain (or so it seems from my perspective). To make it clear: I am running the SM57 directly into the XLR input on the UX1 via an XLR-XLR cable, gain is turned up 7/8ths of the way, directly into my DAW (any more mic gain and the white noise becomes rediculous). The gain when recording vocals (using only a pop-filter between the vocalist and the mic) is acceptable, but still not fantastic. The noise to signal ratio when recording my acoustic guitar, though, is atrocious. Can any one offer advice as to what the problem may be? Could it be the XLR cable? Could there be something worng with my UX1? Is the amount of maximum amount of gain I can hope to get out of the UX1 simply to little to ever be able to record acoustic guitar with a dynamic mic at an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio? Any inputs are appreciated, though may I kindly request that you refrain from suggestions that I purchase a condenser mic (I have noted a trend on these forums to recommend condenser mics as a sort of panacea to any type of mic gain query, even when the purchase thereof is not an option (for whatever reason) to the OP. Given the UX1's lack of phantom power, purchase of a condenser mic would in any case neccesarily imply purchasing a different audio interface, in which event I may as well consider getting an entirely different interface with better preamps and, more importantly, more input gain than the UX1.)
  18. Hi, i've a pod live X3. everything seems to work fine, except one thing. i don't understand how to get a stereo output. Here is what i want. I'm not using dual tone. i pan tone 1 on the left and tone 2 on the right. Suppose to have a chain of effects and amp. I would like to use the "stereo delay". Since is "stereo" i'm expecting to get a stereo output. On stereo output i put 100% mix 1000ms of delay (just to have a big delay) 0% right feedback 0% left feedback 0% offset post-config (notice that THIS effect is the last of the chain) Here are the possible outcomes: -> with this configuration is just get sound from left side with no delay -> if i put 100% offset i get just the sound delayed. just on left side -> if i put the pan in centre, i get sound from both side -> if i get down the mix % i get no difference. always on left -> if i set pre-config, it doesn't change anything how may i have a stereo output? if not, what the meaning of "stereo" in this effect? nb: the two XLR outputs are connected to a different input processes, so i can check if i get some signal in input. i search online and it seems that someone was able to do. if so, may someone explain me how to do it?
  19. pfsmith0

    Gain Line-up Measurements

    In order to get a feel for the signal levels suitable for the HD500, I've made a few measurements of the gains available from the different inputs to the various outputs. I've also measured the gain of all the FX. A small Excel spreadsheet containing the data can be found here (unfortunately, I can only upload a PDF version of the data, which I've done here). A brief summary is shown below: All measurements were made at 1kHz with Master Volume = max, S/PDIF gain = 0dB, and Input2 = Variax (although this didn't make any difference because I had Inputs 1 & 2 panned hard Left/Right). Guitar input pad = -5.2dB compared to normal. 1/4" (line) output has 6.1dB more signal than 1/4" (amp). Aux & Guitar (normal) have the same gain structure (except Guitar has programmable input impedance). Guitar (normal) input to 1/4"(amp) output has 4.9dB of loss with no FX, no Amp, and Mixer = 0dB. Compared to 1/4" (amp) output, the XLR output is 9.4dB less while the phone output is 15.4dB more. Compared to the Aux/Guitar(normal) input, Mic (min gain) has 6.2dB less gain while Mic (max gain) has 38dB more gain. Aux/Guitar(normal) input clips at 0dBFS (measured at S/PDIF) with 8.3Vpp Mic (min gain) input clips at -1.1dBFS (measured at S/PDIF) with 14Vpp Mic (max gain) input clips at -1.1dBFS (measured at S/PDIF) with 91mVpp CD/MP3 input clips at various levels near 20Vpp, depending on which output is used (XLR, 1/4", or Phones) By far most of the FX have 0dB of gain, but there are several exceptions (e.g., Graphic EQ = 2.9dB, Tape Echo = -5dB, and others). FX were measured with Mix=0% (to eliminate comb filtering effects) and Gain=0dB (usually). The PDF files contain the whole list. Using some of this data you can see the clip level is essentially set by digital clipping, although the mic input stage only gets you to within 1.1dB of fullscale (close enough to call it fullscale in my opinion). The output stages will not get close to their clip levels (unless you use the CD/MP3 input which bypasses the digital engine). That is, it's sufficient to look at the S/PDIF signal to keep your signal below fullscale. You don't have to worry about clipping the input stages. You also don't have to worry about clipping the analog output stages. I hope you find this useful in optimizing the setup of your equipment. IO Gain.pdf FX Gain.pdf
  20. Line6Tony

    Audio Cables 101

    Deutsch Francais Introduction This is a primer for using audio cables, how they work, and what the common cable types are. Below are a couple of books that are excellent reference materials that expand on the subject: Wire, Cable, and Fiber Optics for Video & Audio Engineers by Stephen H. Lampen (Aug 1, 1997) http://www.amazon.com/Cable-Fiber-Optics-Video-Engineers/dp/0070381348/ref=lp_B001HO3HHQ_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1335303440&sr=1-2 Audio/Video Cable Installer's Pocket Guide (Pocket Reference) by Stephen H. Lampen (Jan 15, 2002) http://www.amazon.com/Audio-Video-Installers-Pocket-Reference/dp/0071386211/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1335303294&sr=1-2-fkmr1 How an Audio Cable Works Audio cables work by sending electrical signals from one place to another. This is very similar to the way that electrical current flows from a power outlet in your house. However audio cables use much smaller voltages than a common 110 volt plug. Electricity 101 In order for electricity to flow between two points you need two things: a hot or positive wire and a neutral or negative wire. This completes a circuit and allows the electrical signal from your instrument to your amp, mixing console or computer interface. All standard audio cables use this basic electrical principle no matter what connector is attached to the end. This is what is happening when you plug your guitar into your amp with a "¼" guitar cable or when you connect your DVD player to your TV with an RCA plug, they both work exactly the same way. Balanced and Unbalanced Audio Cables I have noticed online that there seems to be a lot of confusion and long explanations about the difference between balanced and unbalanced audio cables. All most guitarists and recording enthusiasts need to know is the basic electrical difference between the two and what that means for them. I’m going to try to explain the difference in plain English as best I can. Unbalanced cables work exactly as I just described. In a guitar cable for instance there is positive wire or tip which connects to the tip of the connector at the end of the cable. And a neutral sleeve that wraps around the wire connected to the tip. The neutral or sleeve serves two purposes: To provide a neutral conductor so that electricity can flow and to shield the positive middle wire from outside interference. -Low impedance audio, or mic level would be 48-52 Ohms (3-pin XLR connectors, balanced lines). -Higher (but not high) impedance audio for mixers and other distributive audio equipment instrument level is around 1,000 [between 680 to 1,800] Ohms (1/4" phone connectors, TS-unbalanced and TRS-balance lines). -High impedance audio Mixers, other circuit applications, distribution amps and other distributive audio line level require 1,000 to 10,000 Ohms (RCA connectors, unbalanced lines). Q: So my guitar cables and pedals are unbalanced? A: YES, nearly all guitar equipment is. Q: Is that bad? A: Absolutely NOT. Unbalanced cables can be prone to outside electrical interference over long distances. Basically the longer the cable, the less effective the sleeve is going to be at shielding the cable from outside electrical interference. Fortunately most guitar cables and patch cables are relatively short so this is usually not an issue for most musicians. A good rule of thumb for any unbalanced cable is if it's over 10ft long and you are using it in a room or on a stage with a lot of other electrical equipment you could hear unwanted hum, buzz, or noise. Q: What does this mean for me? A.(1) Nobody likes to be tied to their amp but try to keep guitar and other unbalanced cables around 10ft or shorter for the least amount of noise and strongest signal. (15ft is usually ok, 25ft is pushing it.) A.(2) In recording situations it's ok to use unbalanced cables in most cases but if you want crystal clear audio try to keep them under 10ft. Also, watch out for unbalanced connections on the back of rack gear. Having an unbalanced connection near that much other gear could cause noise problems. Balanced Cables Balanced cables still rely on a hot conductor and a neutral conductor to carry electrical signals but they add another element to the equation: a ground. A ground is called a ground because well it literally goes into the ground! Straight through the cable, through your balanced audio gear, through the wall to the fuse box and down a wire or pipe into the Earth. In balanced audio cables the sleeve is used as the ground. The ground or sleeve does NOT carry a signal and is NOT heard in the audio. It's simply there to protect from unwanted noise while the hot and neutral carry the signal. Now for the magic: the hot and neutral both carry the same signal, noise and all. Hot is flowing in a positive direction, neutral in a negative direction. Balanced audio equipment simply outputs the voltage difference between the two wires. Since the noise is represented equally on both hot and neutral it is inverted and cancelled out. I know this might sound complicated but what it means for you is that you can have hundreds of feet of balanced cable and still have noise free audio. Q. What types of things use balanced audio cables? A. Microphones and recording equipment is, or should be, balanced in most cases. Q. If I use a balanced cable with my guitar can I balance the signal? A. No. The equipment you are using must have balanced connections as well. Q. Why are balanced cables so expensive? A. They are made with a process called twisted pairing which is more expensive to manufacture than unbalanced cables. Q. If I have the choice of using balanced or unbalanced cables which one should I use? A. In most cases if you are using balanced equipment you should use balanced cables. But if you get into a tight spot and need run something unbalanced it's ok as long as the cable length is short and you get no unwanted noise. How to tell the difference between balanced and unbalanced cables: The technical name for guitar cables is TS which stands for Tip (hot), Sleeve (Neutral). Studio ¼ cables are called TRS which stands for Tip (Hot) Ring (Neutral) Sleeve (Ground) TS Cables have one ring on the connector: TRS Cables have two. Any cable that has three prongs or legs like an XLR Cable is usually balanced. Some cables are made for odd routing situations and are three legged on one side and two pronged on the other. These are still unbalanced. Glossary of Cables: Unbalanced: TS 1/4": This is the standard ¼" cable seen on guitars and unbalanced recording equipment. TS 1/8" Mini: A TS or mono mini plug is most commonly seen as an adapter. RCA or Phono: RCA connections are seen primarily on entry level recording equipment. They are also found on consumer products like DVD players, turntables, and older television sets. Banana Plug: Banana plugs are mostly used for consumer audio speaker connections. Insert or Y Cable: An insert cable splits a stereo signal into two mono parts and is referred to as a Y-Cable because it is literally shaped like a Y. Balanced: XLR: XLR is the most common connection for microphones and is often referred to as a mic cable. TRS ¼": (Notice the two rings around the top of the connector.) TRS is a balanced ¼" cable that is used in studios and live sound reinforcement to minimize noise over long distances. TRS 1/8" Mini: The 1/8" mini plug connector is often used on headphones and other consumer sources like sound cards. Tiny Telephone or TT: The TT or Tiny Telephone is a balanced connection used for connections in professional patch bays. Digital Connections: Most digital connections use the same principles we have already discussed; they just use them in a different way. Digital cables are made to send pulses of current or light that can be decoded by a computer. It is VERY important to use the proper cable type with digital connections. Things like impedance or the amount of resistance present in the cable play an important role in how this information is sent. Just because a S/PDIF cable looks like an RCA Cable doesn't mean the RCA cable plugged into your DVD player can handle a S/PDIF connection. You might experience strange errors and digital distortion if you use a cable that is not properly rated. S/PDIF: S/PDIF or Sony/Phillips Digital Interface is by far the most common digital connection. It uses a 75 ohm unbalanced RCA phono connection. You can use standard RCA cables if they are rated at 75ohms. Optical or Light Pipe: Optical or Light Pipe is a discrete multichannel digital standard developed for the ADAT. It is most commonly seen on digital audio interfaces and preamps. You may also see optical ports on high end consumer devices as an audio connection. Optical cables use pulses of light to send information. They tend to be expensive and fragile so handle with care. AES/EBU: AES/EBU: is basically S/PDIFs big brother. AES uses the same protocol as S/PDIF but it can handle more information at once. AES/EBU uses a balanced connection with XLR on both sides. When using an XLR make sure it is Type 1 (referring to pin order) and rated at 110 ohms. BNC or Bayonet: BNC is an unbalanced connection that is used primarily in professional video as an alternative to RCA. On the audio side of things it is mainly used to carry word clock information. BNC comes in 50 and 75 Ohm varieties, most audio equipment uses 75 ohm. Multi-pin Connectors Multi-pin connectors are usually found on high end audio interfaces and consoles, they are used as a balanced multi channel connection that saves space on the back of a piece of gear. Each pin on the connector is a discrete channel that carries audio or digital information from one point to another. Most guitarists and home recording enthusiasts won't run into these connections too often because they are mainly used in recording or live sound equipment that is very expensive. D-Sub/DB25: D-Sub is a family of connectors used on computer devices and comes in multiple pin configurations. The most common D-Sub connection is the one found on the back of VGA computer monitors. It is not uncommon for companies to use D-Sub to carry audio on high end peripherals because the connectors are common and relatively inexpensive. Elco/Edac: Elco and Edac (which in many cases are interchangeable) are large multi pin connectors that can have as many 120 pins. They can be heavy and have an actuating screw that holds the male and female connectors in place. TDIF: A proprietary type of 25 pin D-Sub that was created by Tascam. It is found on a wide variety of professional recording equipment as an alternative to the ADAT standard. Audio Kabel für Beginner Einführung: Dies ist ein Leitfaden zur Nutzung von Audio Kabeln, wie diese funktionieren und welche die gebräuchlichsten Arten sind. Hierunter finden Sie zwei Bücher, die das Thema Audio Kabel exzellent behandeln: (Achtung, Englisch) Wire, Cable, and Fiber Optics for Video & Audio Engineers von Stephen H. Lampen (1 Aug, 1997) http://www.amazon.com/Cable-Fiber-Optics-Video-Engineers/dp/0070381348/ref=lp_B001HO3HHQ_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1335303440&sr=1-2 Audio/Video Cable Installer's Pocket Guide (Pocket Reference) von Stephen H. Lampen (15 Jan, 2002) http://www.amazon.com/Audio-Video-Installers-Pocket-Reference/dp/0071386211/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1335303294&sr=1-2-fkmr1 Die Funktionsweise eines Audiokabels: Audiokabel versenden ein elektrisches Signal von einem Punkt zum anderen. Dies ist dem normalen Stromfluss wie aus der Steckdose Zuhause sehr ähnlich. Audiokabel benutzen jedoch sehr viel kleinere Spannungen als die Normale 230 Volt Steckdosen-Spannung. Elektrizität: Damit Elektrizität zwischen zwei Punkten fließen kann, braucht es zwei Dinge, einmal eine positive Leitung und eine neutrale Leitung. Wenn man beide hat kann nun ein elektrischer Kreis entstehen, der ein Signal vom Instrument an Ihren Verstärker, Ihren Mixer oder den Computer weiterleitet. Alle standart Audiokabel benutzen dieses Grundprinzip der Elektrik egal welcher Anschluss an das Ende angeschlossen ist. Dies geschieht, wenn Sie z.B. Ihre Gitarre an Ihren Verstärker mit einem 6.35mm Kabel anschließen oder wenn Sie Ihren DVD Player anhand eines RCA Steckers mit Ihrem Fernseher verbinden. Beide funktionieren genau auf diese Weise. Symmetrische und asymmetrische Audiokabel: Im Netz entstehen oft Verwirrung und ewige Erklärungen was das Thema symmetrisch und asymmetrisch angeht. Alles was Gitaristen und Aufnahme-Enthusiasten kennen müssen ist der grundlegende Unterschied zwischen beiden und was das bedeutet. Asymmetrische Kabel funktionieren genu so, wie bisher beschrieben. Im Gittarenkabel (6.35mm – ¼") gibt es somit die positive Leitung, die Spitze und die neutrale Leitung, den Schaft, der sich um die Leitung legt, die an die Spitze angeschlossen ist. Das Neutrale dient hier zwei verschiedenen Zwecken: Erstens dient es als neutrale Leitung um einen Stromfluss erst möglich zu machen und zweitens schützt es die positive, mittlere Leitung vor außenliegenden Interferenzen. Audio niedriger Impedanz: Der Mikrofon-Pegel liegt zwischen 48 und 52 Ω (3 Pin XLR Stecker und symmetrische Verbindungen) Audio höherer Impedanz (aber nicht hoch), für Mixer und andere verteilende Audiogeräte. Der Instrument-Pegel ist hier ca. 1000 Ω (genauer: zwischen 680 und 1800 Ω). (6.35mm Telefonstecker, TS ("tip"= Spitze "sleeve"= Schaft) asymmetrisch und TRS ("tip"= Spitze "ring"= Ring "sleeve"= Schaft) symmetrisch) Audio hoher Impedanz für Mixer, Schaltkreise, verteilende Verstärker oder andere verteilende Audiogeräte. Line-Pegel benötigt 1000 bis 10000 Ω. Also sind meine Gitarren Kabel und Pedale asymmetrisch? Ja, fast jedes Gitarren Equipment ist asymetrisch. Ist das schlecht? Nein... Asymmetrische Kabel sind anfällig für Interferenzen von Außen über lange Distanzen. Im Grunde, desdo länger das Kabel, desdo weniger effektiv ist der Schaft im Schützen des Kabels vor elektrischen Interferenzen. Zum Glück sind die meisten Gitarren- und Patchkabel relativ kurz, was bedeutet, dass es hier meist kein Problem gibt. Als Faustregel gilt: Das asymmetrische Kabel sollte nicht länger sein als 3 Meter sein, wenn Sie es in einem Raum oder auf der Bühne benutzten mit viel elektrischem Material in der Nähe. Wenn es länger ist kann es sein, dass Unerwünschtes wie Brummen, Rauschen und Krach auftaucht. Was bedeutet das für mich? Niemand will an seinen Verstärker gebunden sein, trotzdem sollten Sie versuchen das asymetrische Kabel unter 3 Metern Länge zu halten um möglichst wenig Krach zu erhalten und ein starkes Signal zu haben. (4,5m ist meist noch ok und 7.5m ist grenzwertig) In Aufnahmesituationen ist es meist in Ordnung asymetrische Kabel zu benutzen, wenn Sie aber kristallklaren Ton haben wollen versuchen Sie die Länge der Kabel unter 3 Metern zu halten. Außerdem sollten Sie auf asymetrische Verbindungen auf der Rückseite des Racks achten. Wenn ein asymmetrisches Kabel in der Nähe von so viel Material ist kann ein Rauschen entstehen. Symmetrische Kabel: Symmetrische Kabel benutzen immer noch den positiven und negativen Leiter um das elektrische Signal zu tragen aber hier wird ein drittes Element hinzugefügt: Die Masse. Die Masse geht durch das Kabel, in Ihr symmetrisches Gerät, durch die Wand, den Sicherungskasten und in den Boden. Bei symmetrischen Kabeln dient der Schaft als Masse. Die Masse trägt KEIN Signal und kann nicht im Ton gehört werden. Die Masse dient einzig und allein der Abschirmung vor ungewollten Geräuschen während positiv und neutral das Signal transportieren. Welche Geräte benutzen symmetrische Audiokabel? Mikrofone und Aufnahmegerät sind, oder sollten, in den meisten Fällen symmetrisch sein. Wenn ich ein symmetrisches Kabel mit meiner Gitarre benutzen, kann ich das Signal symmetrisch machen? Nein, das Gerät muss auch immer symmetrisch sein. Warum sind symmetrische Kabel so teuer? Symmetrische Kabel werden mit einem speziellen Verfahren hergestellt, das "Twisted Pairing" oder auch "Aderverdrillung".Dieses Verfahren ist teurer als die normale Herstellung wie bei asymmetrischen Kabeln. Wenn ich die Wahl habe symmetrische oder asymmetrische Kabel zu benutzen, welche benutze ich dann? In den meisten Fällen sollten Sie bei symmetrischen Geräten auch symmetrische Kabel benutzen. Wenn Sie aber mal unbedingt ein asymmetrisches Kabel benutzen müssen, ist das in Ordnung sofern es nicht zu lang ist und Sie kein unerwünschtes Krachen bekommen. Wie kann ich ein symmetrisches von einem asymmetrischen Kabel unterscheiden? Der technische Name für Gitarrenkabel ist TS, was für Tip (= Spitze), das Positive und Sleeve (= Schaft), das Neutrale steht. 6.35mm (1/4") Studio Kabel werden TRS gennant, für Tip (= Spitze), das Positive; Ring, das Neutrale und Sleeve (= Schaft), die Masse. TS Kabel haben einen Ring auf dem Stecker. TRS Kabel haben zwei Ringe. Kabel, die drei Zinken oder Beine haben, wie ein XLR Kabel, sind meist symmetrisch. Manche Kabel werden für sehr spezielle Routing Situationen hergestellt und haben drei Beine an einem Stecker und zwei am anderen. Diese sind immer noch asymmetrisch. Glossar der Kabel: Asymmetrisch: TS 6.35mm (1/4"): Dies ist ein standart 6.35mm Kabel wie bei Gitarren und anderen asymmetrischen Aufnahmegeräten. TS 3.5mm (1/8") Mini: Solch ein TS oder Mono Mini Stecker wird meist als Adapter benutzt. RCA oder Phono: RCA Anschmüsse werden meist bei Einsteiger Aufnahmegeräten verbaut. Außerdem kann man diese auf Verbrauchergeräten finden wie DVD Playern, Turntables oder alten Fernsehgeräten. Bananenstecker: Banenenanschlüsse werden meist bei Lautsprechern für den Endkonsumenten verbaut. Y-, Insertkabel: Ein Insertkabel teilt ein Stereo Signal in zwei Mono Signale und werden Y-Kabel genannt, da es diese Form hat. Symmetrisch: XLR: XLR Kabel werden meist für Mikrofone benutzt und werden so auch oft Mikrofonkabel genannt. TRS 6.3mm (1/4"): Das TRS ist ein symmetrisches Kabel, welches in Studios und bei Liveauftritten verwendet wird um Krachen und Rauschen über lange Distanzen zu minimieren. TRS 3.5mm Mini: Der 3.5mm "Mini" Stecker wird meist bei Kopfhörern oder anderen Konsumentenprodukten verwendet, wie z.B. Soundkarten. Tiny Telephone oder TT: Der TT Stecker wird als symmetrische Kabel für professionelle Patch-Panel verwendet. Digitale Anschlüsse: Die meisten digitalen Anschlüsse verwenden die gleichen Prinzipien wie die, die wir bereits behandelt haben, verwenden diese aber auf eine andere Art. Digitale Kabel senden Strom- oder Lichtimpulse, die von einem Computer entschlüsselt werden können. Bei digitalen Anschlüssen ist es sehr wichtig das korrekte Kabel zu verwenden. Impedanz oder Resistenz spielen bei diesen Kabeln eine große Rolle bei der Datenübertragung. Nur weil ein S/PDIF Kabel wie ein RCA Kabel aussieht, bedeutet das nicht, dass das RCA Kabel, welches man in einen DVD Player einsteckt auch eine P/PDIF Verbindung handhaben kann. S/PDIF: S/PDIF oder Sony/Phillips Digital Interface ist bei Weitem der gebräuchlichste Anschluss. Es benutzt einen 75 Ω, asymmetrischen RCA Stecker. ADAT Lightpipe: ADAT Lightpipe ist ein Audio Protokoll, welches als digitaler multikanal Standart für ADAT entwickelt wurde. Am häufigsten findet man diesen Anschluss bei digitalen Audioschnittstellen und Vorverstärkern. Diese Lichtleitanschlüsse kann man manchmal auch auf hochwertigen Verbraucher-Geräten als Audioanschluss finden. Lichtwellenkabel benutzen Lichtimpulse um Informationen zu versenden. Oftmals sind diese Kabel eher teuer und zerbrechlich und müssen daher mit Sorgfalt behandelt werden. AES/EBU: AES/EBU ist eigentlich der große Brider des S/PDIF Anschlusses. AES benutzt das selbe Protokoll wie der S/PDIF Anschluss, kann aber viel mehr Informationen gleichzeitig transportieren. AES/EBU sind symmetrisch und haben auch dementsprechende symmetrische XLR Stecker an beiden Enden. Wenn Sie ein einfaches XLR Kabel benutzen wollen brachen Sie eines des Typen 1 (in Bezug auf die Stiftordnung) bei 110 Ω. BNC oder Bayonet: Das BNC ist ein asymmetrisches Kabel, welches vorwiegend bei professionellen Video Anwendungen als Alternative zu RCA verwendet wird. Was Audio angeht, wird es meist als Träger für Wordclock Informationen verwendet. BNC hat einmal eine 50 Ω und eine 75 Ω Variation, die meisten Audiogeräte verwenden aber die 75 Ω Variante. Mehrpolige Stecker: Mehrpolige Stecker, bzw. Multi-Pin Stecker sind meist auf High-End Audio Schnittstellen und Konsolen zu sehen. Sie werden als symmetrische Multikanal-Verbindung benutzt, die Platz auf der Rückseite des Gerätes spart. Jeder Pin ist ein separater Kanal, der ein Audio Signal oder digitale Informationen trägt. Die meisten Gitaristen und Aufnahmeenthusiasten werden nicht sehr oft auf diese Art Stecker stoßen, da diese meist bei sehr teurem Aufnahme- und Live-Sound-Geräten verwendet werden. D-Sub/DB25: Die D-Sub Steckerfamilie wird oft bei Computern benutzt und kommt in verschiedensten Pin-Konfigurationen. Der gebräuchlichste D-Sub ist der VGA Stecker, den man auf der Rückseite vieler Computer Monitore finden kann. Der D-Sub Stecker wird oftmals verwendet, da die Stecker sehr weit verbreitet und relativ billig herzustellen sind. Elco/Edac: Elco und Edac (die meist untereinander austauschbar sind), sind große Multi-Pin Stecker, die bis zu 120 Pins beinhalten. Sie können sehr schwer werden und haben eine Schraube zum Einrasten, die das männliche und weibliche Ende zusammenhält. TDIF: Der TDIF Stecker ist eine Art D-Sub, aber mit 25 Pins. Er wurde von Tascam entwickelt. Dieser Anschluss wird oft auf porfessionellen Aufnahmegeräten als Alternative zum ADAT Standart verwendet. Câbles audio pour les débutants Introduction: Ce document explique les différents câbles audio, comment ils fonctionnent et quels sont les câbles les plus populaires. Les livres ci-dessous sont des références excellentes concernant ce sujet: (Anglais) Wire, Cable, and Fiber Optics for Video & Audio Engineers de Stephen H. Lampen (Aug 1, 1997) http://www.amazon.com/Cable-Fiber-Optics-Video-Engineers/dp/0070381348/ref=lp_B001HO3HHQ_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1335303440&sr=1-2 Audio/Video Cable Installer's Pocket Guide (Pocket Reference) de Stephen H. Lampen (Jan 15, 2002) http://www.amazon.com/Audio-Video-Installers-Pocket-Reference/dp/0071386211/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1335303294&sr=1-2-fkmr1 Fonctionnement du câble audio: Les câbles audio fonctionnent en envoyant des signaux électriques d'un endroit à un autre. Ceci est très similaire à la façon dont le courant électrique dans votre maison circule. Mais les câbles audio utilisent des tensions beaucoup plus faibles que la prise 230 volt générale. Électricité: Afin d'électricité de circuler entre deux points, vous avez besoin de deux choses: Un fil positive et un fil neutre. Ceci achève un circuit et permet un signal électrique de votre instrument à votre ampli, table de mixage ou ordinateur. Tous les câbles audio standard utilisent ce principe de base en électricité n'importe quel connecteur est fixée à l'extrémité. Tous ca arrivent si vous connectez votre guitare à un ampli avec un câble 6.35mm ou si vous connectez un lecteur DVD avec une TV avec une prise RCA. Les deux travaillent de la même façon. Câbles audio symétriques et asymétriques Il y en a beaucoup de confusion et explications longues concernant les différences entre les câbles symétrique et asymétrique. La plupart des guitaristes et enthousiastes d'enregistrement doivent seulement savoir que la différence de base électrique et ce que ca veut dire. Les câbles asymétriques fonctionnent exactement comme décrit ci-dessus. Dans un câble guitare, par exemple, il y en a un fil positif, la "pointe" et un fil neutre, le "manchon". Le neutre sert à deux choses: Fournir un conducteur neutre pour que l'électricité peut circuler et de protéger le fil de milieu positif de toute interférence extérieure. Audio d'impédance basse, ou sur "niveau microphone". De 48 à 52 Ω. (connexion XLR à 3 broches, lignes symétriques) Audio d'impédance plus haute (mais pas haute) pour les tables de mixage ou autres équipement audio de distribution. Le "niveau instrument" est environ 1 000 Ω (entre 680 et 1 800). Connecteurs jack 6.35mm, lignes TS asymétrique (jack 2 points) et TRS symétrique (jack 3 points). Audio d'impédance haute pour les tables de mixage, amplificateurs de distribution et autre audio distributive. Le niveau de ligne a besoin de 1 000 à 10 000 Ω. (connecteurs RCA, lignes asymétrique) Donc, mes câbles de guitare et pédale sont asymétriques? Oui, presque tout le matériel de guitare est asymétrique. Est-ce que c'est mauvais? Non. Les câbles asymétriques peuvent être vulnérables pour les interférences électriques sur longues distances. En général, si le câble est plus long, le manchon sera moins efficace à protéger le câble des interférences électriques externes. Heureusement, la plupart des câbles de guitare et câbles de raccordement sont normalement courtes donc ce n'est généralement pas un problème pour la plupart des musiciens. Règle générale: Si le câble est plus long que 3 mètres, et vous l'utilisez avec beaucoup de matériel électrique dans une chambre ou sur une scène, vous pouvez entendre bruits, bourdonnements ou rumeurs indésirables. Qu'est-ce que ca veut dire pour moi? Personne n'aime être "lié" à l'ampli mais essayez de na pas utiliser des câbles plus long que 3 mètres pour le signal plus fort et stable. (4,5m est normalement ok mais 7,5m sera habituellement trop de distance.) Dans les situations d'enregistrement, c'est bien d'utiliser des câbles asymétriques dans la plupart des cas mais si vous voulez du son limpide, essayez d'avoir des câbles sous 3m. Faites attentions aux connexions asymétriques en arrière du rack. Si vous avez beaucoup d'autre matériel près d'une connexion asymétrique peut causer des problèmes de bruit. Câbles symétriques Les câbles symétriques toujours utilisent un positive et neutre pour générer un signal électrique mais ils ajoutent un troisième élément: la terre électrique. La terre est appelé terre parce que elle va via le câble et votre matériel symétrique dans le mur, la boîte à fusibles dans la terre. Pour les câbles symétriques, le manchon est utilisé comme terre. La terre n'a aucun signal et ne peut pas être entendu dans l'audio. La terre protège seulement des bruits indésirables. Maintenant, la magique: Le positif et le neutre transportent le même signal, tous le son et les bruits…. Le matériel symétrique uniquement sortie la différence de tension entre les deux. Car le bruit est représenté également sur les deux, il est inversé et annulé. Ca veut dire que vous pouvez avoir centaines de mètres de câble symétrique et toujours avoir du audio sans bruit. Quel matériel utilise des câbles audio symétriques? Microphones et matériel d'enregistrement sont, ou devraient être symétriques. Si j'utilise un câble symétrique avec ma guitare, est-ce que je peux faire le signal symétrique? Non, le matériel vous utilisez doit être symétrique également. Pourquoi est-ce que les câbles symétriques sont si chers? Ces câbles sont produits de façon "paire torsadée", ce procès est plus cher que la production normale du câble asymétrique. Si j'ai la possibilité d'utiliser des câbles symétriques ou asymétriques, lequel dois-je utiliser? Dans la plupart des cas, si vous utilisez du matériel symétrique, vous devez utiliser des câbles symétriques. Mais si vous devez une fois utiliser un câble asymétrique, c'est bon à condition que le câble soit court et vous ne recevez pas du bruit indésirable. Comment est-ce qu'on fait la différence entre les câbles symétriques et asymétriques? Le nom technique des câbles guitare sera TS: "Tip" (pointe: positive) et "Sleeve" (manchon: neutre) Câbles studio 6.35mm seront des câbles TRS: "Tip" (pointe: positive), "Ring" (anneau: neutre) et "Sleeve" (manchon: terre) Les câbles TS ont un anneau sur le connecteur. Les câbles TRS ont deux anneaux. Les câbles avec trois dents, comme un câble XLR sont habituellement symétriques. Certains câbles sont produits pour des situations de routage bizarres. Ils ont trois broches à un connecteur et deux broches sur l'autre. Ces câbles sont asymétriques. Glossaire des câbles: Asymétriques: TS 6.35mm: C'est le câble standard pour les guitares et pour le matériel asymétrique d'enregistrement. TS 3.5mm Mini: Ce connecteur Mono ou TS est le plus souvent considéré comme un adaptateur. RCA ou Phono: Les connecteurs RCA sont vus principalement sur ​​l'équipement d'enregistrement d'entrée de gamme. Ces connecteurs sont également sur les produits de consommateur, comme le lecteur DVD, les plaques tournantes ou plus vieux télévisions. Fiche banane: Les fiches banane sont principalement utilisées pour les connexions des haut-parleurs du consommateur. Câbles Y, Insert: Le câble Y divise le signal stéréo dans deux parties mono. Symétriques: XLR: Le câble XLR est le câble la plus fréquente pour les microphones et est souvent désigné comme un "câble micro". Câble TRS 6.35mm: (Remarquez les deux anneaux autour de la partie supérieure du connecteur.) TRS est un câble 6.35 symétrique utilisé dans les studios et live pour minimiser les bruits sur longues distances. TRS 3.5mm Mini: Ce connecteur est souvent utilisé pour les écouteurs et autres appareils du consommateur comme les cartes de son. Tiny Telephone ou TT: Ce câble est une connexion symétrique pour les patchs professionnels. Connexions digitales: La plupart de connexions digitales utilisent les mêmes fonctions de base que nous avons déjà discutés; ces connexions seulement les utilisent dans une autre manière. Les câbles digitaux envoient des impulsions de courant ou lumière. Ce signal peut-être décodé de l'ordinateur. C'est très important d'utiliser le câble approprié pour les connexions digitales. L'impédance ou résistance jouent un rôle très important dans la façon dont cette information est envoyée. Juste parce qu'un câble S/PDIF ressemble à un câble RCA ne veut pas dire que le câble RCA peut traiter une connexion S/PDIF. Vous pourriez rencontrer des erreurs bizarres et de la distorsion numérique si vous utilisez un câble qui n'est pas correctement évalué. S/PDIF: S/PDIF ou Sony/Phillips Digital Interface est le câble le plus commun pour les connexions digitales. Ce câble utilise une connexion RCA Phono de 75 Ω. Câbles ADAT Lightpipe: ADAT Lightpipe est une norme digitale développé pour ADAT. Ils sont vu plus communs sur les interfaces audio digitales et sur préamplificateurs. Parfois, vous le pouvez trouver sur des appareils haut de gamme des consommateurs comme connexion audio. Ces câbles utilisent des impulsions de lumière pour envoyer des informations. Ces câbles ont tendance à être cher et fragile, donc: Manipuler avec précaution. AES/EBU: Câbles AES/EBU utilisent le même protocole comme le câble S/PDIF mais sais transporter plus d'informations en même temps. AES/EBU a des connecteurs symétriques XLR. Si vous voulez utiliser un câble XLR, veuillez vous assurer que c'est un Type 1 à 110 Ω. BNC ou Bayonet: BNC est une connexion asymétrique utilisée principalement en vidéo professionnel comme alternative pour RCA. Pour audio, ce câble est habituellement utilisé pour transporter des informations Wordclock. BNC est 50 Ω ou 75 Ω mais la plupart du matériel audio utilise la version 75 Ω. Connecteurs multibroches: Connecteurs multibroches se trouvent généralement sur les interfaces audio haut de gamme et sur consoles, ils sont utilisés come connexion multicanal symétrique qui économise de l'espace sur le dos d'une pièce d'équipement. Chaque broche est un canal séparé qui transporte des informations audio ou numérique d'un point à un autre. La plupart des guitaristes et enthousiastes d'enregistrement ne trouvent ces connexions très souvent. Ces connexions sont principalement utilisées dans les équipements d'enregistrement ou de son live qui est très cher. D-Sub/DB25: D-Sub est une famille des connecteurs utilisés pour les ordinateurs et est disponible dans multiples configurations des broches. La connexion la plus fréquent est laquelle trouvé sur le dos des moniteurs VGA. Ces connecteurs sont très répandu pour transporter des signaux audio parce qu'ils sont commun est bon marché. Elco/Edac: Elco et Edac sont des connecteurs multibroches larges qui peuvent avoir jusqu'à 120 broches. Ces connecteurs peuvent être très lourds et ont une vis pour attaché mâle et femelle. TDIF: Un type de D-Sub 25 broches qui ont été créé par Tascam. Ce connecteur se trouve sur une grande variété de matériel d'enregistrement professionnel en tant qu'alternative à la norme ADAT.
  21. Q: Are the XLR outputs of the LD series line level? A: Yes, the XLR outputs on all of our Lowdown amps are balanced line level outputs. The line level output not affected by the output volume of the amplifier, and will send a cabinet simulated tone to your mixing console. Q: What if I do not want the cabinet tone but rather a unaffected tone (like a DI Box?) A: If you desire an unaffected bass tone in addition to the cabinet simulated tone you will want to go into a DI box and send the DI signal to the mixing console, and have the instrument output of the DI go into the instrument input of the Lowdown amplifier. Q: What controllers work with the Lowdown series? A:The FBV series is the correct controller for the Lowdown series, we recommend the FBV Shortboard or FBV Express. The FBV (Longboard) is not optimized for use with the Lowdown family of amplifiers, and the FBV2 is not compatible with a certain amount of early LowDowns. Please contact Line 6 Customer Support in this case for assistance.
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