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Can my luthier repair my JTV69?

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Do you not understand what I'm talking about?

 

I understand you just fine, I just don't agree. I also understand that you'll probably continue to nip and tuck your objections the more people disagree with you. First, no one but an "authorized" technician could so much as touch the input jack without causing irreparable damage...now you've backpedaled to just the "unfamiliar electronics". And since I'm not going to be able to improve on the following list of reasons why it's really not necessary to quake with fear at the idea of taking a JTV to an "unauthorized" shop for work, I'll just quote him instead:

 

Sorry clay-man, but I can't agree with you here.

 

I'm an electronics guy and I am always working on things I have never seen before. A lot of them are fixable, some are not. But I know my limitations, and I know when to say "you need to send this back to the manufacturer".

 

Any decent luthier should be capable of doing normal guitar electronics, including complete wiring of pickups, switches, and controls.

 

Now, the Variax is a different beast, but the local "authorised service center" is simply going to do board level replacements as well, not component level replacements. The one advantage I see with an "authorised service center" is that the work will probably be guaranteed. At a board level, the Variax is no more complicated than a standard guitar. The parts are hard to get, but not hard to solder, and no one, not even Line 6 head-office, is replacing components on boards. Not worth the time and effort. Just bin it, and put in the new board.

 

In this particular instance, the OP just has a faulty pot. Dead simple to replace. The problem is that Variax pots are non-standard. But, the part is available, and also dead simple to replace. Sure, in an ideal world these would go back to a local authorised service center, at not too high a cost, but for some people, that is simply not practical and as I say, if you have a decent local luthier, they really can't make the situation worse, and often will make it better.

 

But at the end of the day, it's your instrument...do what you like.

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I think we have all been arguing about different things here.  My point is that the setup is not anything special that a trained luthier can't handle.  The electronics are a different thing.  There it really depends on what is wrong.  Replacing parts isn't that hard but many of the parts are not standard and must be replaced with exact replacements.  I think electronic problems should be left to the Variax experts.

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I can understand that, but again, I tried replacing my board in my 600 and it did absolutely nothing, because it needs flashed, and I'm not talking about using the interface to flash it, I mean like a flash using some type of writing device that only Line 6 would have.

Sure, in situations like this, luthiers wouldn't be able to fix an issue like that. A local electronics guy could probably determine the problem, and tell you it needs to go back to the manufacturer.

 

The problem is, how do you know that the components you order online are ready to go in a guitar, and not just components fresh off the line that's ready for someone to put in with the proper equipment?

Yes, that could be a problem, but I think it's more the exception than the rule and even if the replacement doesn't work, there's really no way you could have made the situation worse, unless you broke a knob or something, but that's true of any guitar repair.

 

A pot is understandable, and should be an easy solder job, but if the guy (luthier) says he doesn't know, he doesn't know.

Exactly. Whether it's a luthier, doctor or mechanic, once he says "yeah, not sure", it's time to go to the next guy. My only point is that a lot of things can in fact be fixed by your local luthier, including variax things.

 

Here's the quote from the OP:

This is exactly my concern: if the volume and tone pots are more complicated, and my luthier doesn't really understand how to interact with them, I may end up causing more damage. Does Line 6 provide schematics or a repair manual for basic upgrades/fixes? For example, how are people managing to upgrade pickups?

Notice he doesn't say his luthier doesn't understand, he says "if my luthier doesn't understand". He was looking for feedback on whether he can take this problem to his luthier. He was worried that being a variax, the pots may be complicated. And they are, but only in the sense they are special parts. And yes, he can go to his luthier first. It's a simple fix. If his luthier looks at it says he can't fix it then that is the time to take it to an authorised service center (or local electronics guy).

 

 

You can show him the part online, and tell him to have at it, and he can maybe fix it since it's something simple like a 6 prong solder point, or maybe a component you can plug in.

Agreed, and it's really not very different to taking your prized Fender/PRS/LP to him with a broken pot. As long as you also give him the replacement part.

 

My point is, I've personally tried to just "buy an electronic piece and swap it myself", and it didn't work. I did nothing wrong, everything was assembled as it should be. No sound, no recognition from monkey, so I sent the piece back to fullcompass.

 

That's my point.

I see, and I think that is a great point, which people probably would not have thought of. But apart from that, I think people should feel quite OK with taking their Variax to a luthier or electronics guy if necessary and when he says "no idea", then it's time to call Line 6. I think it's important that people are not afraid to do that.
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I think we have all been arguing about different things here.  My point is that the setup is not anything special that a trained luthier can't handle.  The electronics are a different thing.  There it really depends on what is wrong.  Replacing parts isn't that hard but many of the parts are not standard and must be replaced with exact replacements.  I think electronic problems should be left to the Variax experts.

So for me, there are two points here:

1) Not everyone has easy access to an authorised repair center, and they can be expensive.

2) As someone who has opened up my JTV59 and replaced the pickups, I think people are much more scared than they should be of the "advanced electronics" of the JTV. There are specialty parts, but other than that, it's pretty standard DSP electronics. Most of the advances are in the software. Other than that, it's a battery, with a control board, some control pots and switches (all specialty), some mag pickups, some piezo pickups, and an output jack (also, all specialty). If I move my pot, and it sometimes works, and sometimes doesn't, or works on digital but not analog, but everything powers up OK, and the switches work, etc., then there's a very, very good chance that it's a loose wire, a dirty pot, or replacing the pot will fix the problem.

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Listen, Ozbadman hit it on the head here. Clayman also has brought up a good point also.

My 59 bricked during a software update. Caused no actual damage to the guitar itself, but it had to go back to L6

so they could cast some witches spell on the thing so it would work again. Only they could wake Sleeping Beauty with a kiss it seems.

I had bought it from Sweetwater and tried to get it repaired there first, but they told me that if there was a main board problem and it might be needed to be replaced, that they would send it to L6. Turned out a bad USB Dongle had caused the whole mess in the first place. So I don't think that even all the "Authorized Service Centers" can fix everything without it going back to the factory at some point........This seems to be a decision made by L6 to limit the capabilities of their own service centers.

 I guess that the moral of the story here is...........One never stops being amazed by all the little things that can, and does affect these things, and you have to approach what your issues are with a lot of deduction and common sense depending on your individual circumstances. I also think L6 has about the worst service/parts availability business plan that makes things more difficult than they have to be ....IMHO.    Unless you like waiting forever and shipping your stuff all over the country.

 I have a great luthier who can fix any guitar, but he knows by experience when he has to stop at a certain point due to parts availability, or lack of the proper tools, or just plain lack of valid repair info from the company involved with that particular instrument. And I'm not talking about set-ups here, just repairs or modifications.

 It's a long and winding road that we have embarked on here,

                                                                                          I'm just glad I don't have to send my truck to Detroit for a tune-up.

 

                                                                           Shawn

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Just got my 59 & 69S back from my luthier -- didn't see any lightning damage -- whew!!  :rolleyes:  My Tele Deluxe and Country Gent made it back unscathed as well....

 

This guy's got the touch with 'em, I gotta say. Both the 59 & 69S play a lot easier, now. I'm thinking my models sound a bit better as well. He lowered the action at the nut, and over-all, adjusted the PU heights (a tad lower on the 69S, and the bridge PU up a bit on the 59. No buzzes up & down both necks. Also looks like he got the 69S's strings more centered on the neck -- maybe he adjusted the neck seating. Did some fret work. Worth every penny. I've been wanting to get them in to him for a while.

 

I have a new face-plate coming for my 69S, so I'm going to have to be very careful to note the PU heights when I change that out. It won't mess with the neck & intonation work he did, but will still have to be very careful. He won't be back in town for several months.

 

Dave

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I understand you just fine, I just don't agree. I also understand that you'll probably continue to nip and tuck your objections the more people disagree with you. First, no one but an "authorized" technician could so much as touch the input jack without causing irreparable damage...now you've backpedaled to just the "unfamiliar electronics". And since I'm not going to be able to improve on the following list of reasons why it's really not necessary to quake with fear at the idea of taking a JTV to an "unauthorized" shop for work, I'll just quote him instead:

 

 

But at the end of the day, it's your instrument...do what you like.

 

You're being a moron. I always was referring to the unfamiliar electronics. The guts. 

Stuff like replacing a piezo or bridge is something anyone can do.

 

I've told  you over, and over, that ordering an electronic piece online isn't going to do s*** because they aren't prepared to go into a guitar yet.

 

I've already told you that I ordered a coffin for my 600 and it didn't work because it wasn't pre-flashed and there's 0 code for any interface to detect it's even a Variax.

 

Now you can disagree with that, and when you order that part online and wonder why it's not working, don't say I didn't tell you so.

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:rolleyes:  My Tele Deluxe and Country Gent made it back unscathed  

 

Could you post a pic of that Country Gent?     drool, drool, drool ?

 

                                                    Shawn

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Ok -- I'll try. I don't have the best of luck attaching files on this site...

 

My long story - short is -- I got this guitar back after about 25 years.... I got her all fixed over the past year....

 

Dave

post-98161-0-20817600-1432362922_thumb.jpg

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Ok -- I'll try. I don't have the best of luck attaching files on this site...

 

My long story - short is -- I got this guitar back after about 25 years.... I got her all fixed over the past year....

 

Dave

 

I knew I was gonna hate you after seeing this  :rolleyes:

That is one beautiful vintage guitar you have.

I'm about to break one of the ten commandments and lust after yer girl.

Hope that's OK with you?

How in the world did you ever let her leave in the first place?

It's good to see it back where it obviously belongs.......Congrats,

 

                                                                            Shawn

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funny thing is i just traded a 62 reissue country gent myself for a gibson es-335 couldn't be happier!

the Gretsch was a great guitar, and i miss the bigsby..but the 335 is just more versatile to me.

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I got my Country Gentleman back last year after selling it back to the original owner over 20 - 25 years... Long story... I've been playing in weekender bands since I was 16, and started with a band here over 30 years ago. The bass player, Gary in that band bought this CG he told me in 1966 or 67 from a local music store. He turned out to be a bass player, so some time in the late 70's sold it to Mike in the band. I bought it from Mike in the early 80's. I wanted a Strat for lead work in the band and couldn't justify keeping the CG too, at the time, so I sold it back to Gary, the original owner... so it went full circle, and I regretted it ever since.

I'm in another band now, but the old band gets together to jam, and I finally convinced Gary to sell the CG back to me a year ago, so have it again.

When I had it the first time, the tuning heads were not in great shape and wouldn't hold it in tune. The best I could do at the time were some gold Schallers, and I wasn't a big fan of the bar bridge, so got a gold arch top tune-omatic. I kept all the original parts, and included them with the guitar when I sold it back to him. In the 20+ years since then, he misplaced them somewhere, and I have little hope of getting them back, although he'll give them to me if he finds them.

 

I bought replacement tuners and bridge specifically for the Gent. The bridge needed fitting to the arch top, so after seeing the process on line, I decided I'd better let a pro do it. I could have done the tuners, but I was having this work and the other 3 guitars worked on as well....

 

The reason I was going for the Strat back when I sold this one was that this Gent is not really your typical lead guitar and I'd been a Fender guy by that point for most of my gigging (the Tele Deluxe). I was early in my regular engineering career, so was not comfortable justifying to myself having many guitars.... I think I have 9 electrics and about as many acoustics, plus 2 banjo's, 3 or 4 mandolins, 3 or 4 fiddles, saxophones, etc.... Seems I've gotten over my justification issues.... ;) I don't have a resophonic guitar yet....

 

Dave

 

 

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funny thing is i just traded a 62 reissue country gent myself for a gibson es-335 couldn't be happier!

the Gretsch was a great guitar, and i miss the bigsby..but the 335 is just more versatile to me.

 

I think so too on that point, but...................Damit !     She's a looker    I know some girls that just have to stand there too & I'm happy !   :)   B)

 

 

 

 

Dave, I did an art piece of a TSB 59.

PM me if you want.     S. K.

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You're being a moron.

As is always the case with the truly eloquent, it always swings back around to name calling. I officially give up. You're right, you've always been right, and none of it has ever been stated better. I stand humbled in the presence of greatness.

 

Why don't we just ignore each other...we'll both waste less time.

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 @ cruision2 I had to block this guy very abusive and condescending or an did I say a bully. He attacks when people don't see his way. Must be a very sad person. Plus I give you props for rising above the BS.

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As is always the case with the truly eloquent, it always swings back around to name calling. I officially give up. You're right, you've always been right, and none of it has ever been stated better. I stand humbled in the presence of greatness.

 

Why don't we just ignore each other...we'll both waste less time.

 

Cruzer, I need you to save yourself for your next great soliloquy anyway.

 

The good book says not to cast your pearls before swine,  ie:, Don't waste the good stuff on those that don't know the difference.

 

How about we call it a draw....that way you BOTH win???

 

It's better than cutting the baby in half to settle a joint custody suit!  If you know what I mean........

 

                                                                 Still King Solomonning It

 

P.S.  Clayman... we got it .

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It's better than cutting the baby in half to settle a joint custody suit! If you know what I mean........

 

Still King Solomonning It

 

 

Lol...well said. ;)

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As is always the case with the truly eloquent, it always swings back around to name calling. I officially give up. You're right, you've always been right, and none of it has ever been stated better. I stand humbled in the presence of greatness.

 

Why don't we just ignore each other...we'll both waste less time.

 

Then stop saying stuff that isn't true. I can understand the point if your warranty is out, and a luthier is good with guitar electronics and soldering, but it's still something they've never done regardless.

 

If it's under warranty, send it to Line 6, if it's not under warranty, if it's the electronics, you probably should send it to Line 6, because of reasons I've stated multiple of times, but it's up to you if you want to send it to a luthier.

 

I wouldn't have had a problem with you if you didn't completely crap on and mock my genuine concern over someone breaking their Variax even further.

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Then stop saying stuff that isn't true. I can understand the point if your warranty is out, and a luthier is good with guitar electronics and soldering, but it's still something they've never done regardless.

 

If it's under warranty, send it to Line 6, if it's not under warranty, if it's the electronics, you probably should send it to Line 6, because of reasons I've stated multiple of times, but it's up to you if you want to send it to a luthier.

 

I wouldn't have had a problem with you if you didn't completely crap on and mock my genuine concern over someone breaking their Variax even further.

Guess we'll need a tutorial on "ignoring". Bye-bye.

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It got so bad with this dude that I went to the ignore preference and put him in there.

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I'm not entirely sure how an innocent inquiry into whether or not a local luthier can repair a JTV Variax generated such controversy, but this is the internetz after all  :wacko:

 

Again, I am grateful for the (constructive) input. I do think my luthier is smart enough to let me know if something is beyond his purview; however, I have not evaluated how complex the electronics are to work with. I have enough information from your collective feedback to make a decent value judgment now, thank you  B)

 

Rich

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I don't understand why people are talking about how cruisinon2 was "rising above" my posts when he came at me with sarcastic posts that mocked anything I had to say. This is the last place I expect ridiculous troll comments, and yet I get them from him about my opinion instead of him respectfully disagreeing, and then he makes these rude comments like "A VOICE OF REASON!!!" and "OH LOOK SOMEONE CAN ACTUALLY FIX THEIR VARIAX WITHOUT LINE 6'S HELP!!!"

 

Of course some people can, but the whole thing is, it's more likely that you'll run into someone who can't outside of line 6, which increases the chance of ruining the guitar further.

 

Why send it to a person who might not know what to do, when you can send it to someone who does? Is this some type of rebellion against Line 6? It seems kind of childish to me.

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I'd like to apologize for being against that point persistently, but I was trying to say, that I understand ozbadman and that he convinced me about small electronics, but I still firmly suggest anything big should be handled by a service center.

 

I've already stated, I've installed a 300/600 coffin gut case in my Variax 600 and it did nothing because it was not installed with firmware or anything that would tell the Variax Interface that it's a Variax guitar, therefor I cannot flash it with a Variax Interface, and a service center/Line 6 can only flash it.

 

Maybe the JTV guts come preflashed, but it's not guaranteed.

 

Is it unfair that Line 6 doesn't give us information about the guitar so we can handle problems we have with it? Yes. But that's the exact reason why it can be sketchy to hand it off to someone who doesn't know the guitar.

 

Stuff like pots, and basic solder stuff, would be fine, but if you CAN send it to a service center, why not? Is there some type of rebellion against the service center? "Yeah, that'll show line 6 we can live without them!" Even though it's their product in the first place that you bought.

 

I don't understand.

 

I'd love for people to be able to figure the ins and outs of a guitar, but for a guy just trying to fix it, if you can send it to a service center, why not?

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Not really wanting to wade into the spat here, but I prefer to have a luthier that I know and trust -- that is a big point for me -- do the regular guitar type of work. He did excellent work with 4 of my guitars last week -- 2 vintage guitars and my 2 JTV's -- the 59 and the 69S.

 

I had a pretty good set up on the 59 from the factory and Sweetwater -- pretty good action, no buzzes. The 69S from the factory/Sweetwater needed to be tweaked by me, as I had some minor fret buzzing. I gave the neck a touch of relief and raised the bridges a touch to alleviate the buzzing, which we all know is vital to the modeling. It made the action on the 69 a bit high. It was not enough of a pain for me to box it up and send it to a service center.

 

I went through agony with the 59 that I did have to ship back to L6 due to the 3-Way Switch malfunction (I was an early adopter -- ordered it Oct 2010, got it May 2011, sent it back right away). That whole process of shipping hassle, then waiting was excruciating. They did a quick turnaround on it, but it was about 2 weeks total. I looked for local Line 6 Authorized Service Centers -- the closest I found was Rockford, IL, BUT (at least at that time) they ONLY worked on them if you bought the guitar from them. Dunno why they were even listed in the L6's Service Center list. The rest are on the order of 3 to 6 hours away -- mostly in major metro's.

 

My luthier set up the 2 JTV's PERFECTLY. He lowered the nut slots for better action than original in that part of the neck, He apparently reset the 69S's neck in the pocket to better line up the low and hi E strings, he got the neck in arrow straight shape, set up the bridges, set the pickups' heights so as not to mess with intonation, and provide a good tone and signal level. There is not a buzz to be found up and down either neck of the 59 or 69S. He was familiar with JTV's -- he's worked on them before. I discussed with him that I had to raise set up's on my guitars a touch after he had worked with them, as I apparently have a heavier pick attack that what he set up for me, and the strings would slap the finger board. He took that into account for my set up and it plays low and fast, but no slapping as well.

 

Ok -- as far as I'm concerned all the above work he did was what I expect for the physical guitar mechanics. Would I take my guitars to somebody I don't trust to do the right thing -- including telling me what he isn't comfortable doing? Absolutely not -- regular prized guitar or Variax -- uh uh. Unfortunately, this guy's only in town a few times a year for his elderly parents. He lives in Texas, and works for a major music store down there. When he gets back here, he gets piled on by local guitarists who get wind of it like me. I had heard of him several years ago, but he had already move to TX by then. Anyway next time he's in town I'll take him a few more to get in shape.

 

If I had a fried board or major component in my JTV. I would not have him work on that. I would also not box it up and send it off. I would probably find the and drive it to the closest L6 registered service center (won't be Rockford, IL) just so I could get a warranty on their work. My JTV's are both out of warranty now. I am comfortable with the innards, BUT I would want a warranty on the work from them. One reason I got 2 JTV's is for contingency backup situations, not just broken strings...

 

I changed the pickups in my 69S to noiseless  DiMarzio's within 3 months of having it. My preference, my choice. If it voided the warranty, that worry's behind me. Some folks don't have that comfort level, I do. It is also in what I consider to be normal electric guitar stuff. connect the new leads where the old ones were, boom -- done. Now if the switch and circuitry connected to the pickups would malfunction -- service center. Ya gotta know when to call in the pro's. Also should know where the normal guitar stuff ends and the higher tech stuff begins. The Line 6 Tech not handing out info for free is just protecting his turf, in MHO. If a set up is done wrong, the guitar may play and sound like crap, but it ain't gonna blow up....

 

My 2 cents. Talk amongst yourselves. Nothing to see here, move along, move along. These droids aren't the ones you're looking for....

 

Dave

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I am completely with you Dave.  If you have a guy you trust with setups - first you are lucky to have found him - second - he will know his own limitations when it comes to electronics.  (Maybe he is an electronic whiz?)  I would rather have a trusted luthier work on my setup than some guy in a service center that may or may not really know how to set up a guitar.  I am not knocking the service centers but they are an Unknown. 

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Not really wanting to wade into the spat here, but I prefer to have a luthier that I know and trust -- that is a big point for me -- do the regular guitar type of work. He did excellent work with 4 of my guitars last week -- 2 vintage guitars and my 2 JTV's -- the 59 and the 69S.

 

I had a pretty good set up on the 59 from the factory and Sweetwater -- pretty good action, no buzzes. The 69S from the factory/Sweetwater needed to be tweaked by me, as I had some minor fret buzzing. I gave the neck a touch of relief and raised the bridges a touch to alleviate the buzzing, which we all know is vital to the modeling. It made the action on the 69 a bit high. It was not enough of a pain for me to box it up and send it to a service center.

 

I went through agony with the 59 that I did have to ship back to L6 due to the 3-Way Switch malfunction (I was an early adopter -- ordered it Oct 2010, got it May 2011, sent it back right away). That whole process of shipping hassle, then waiting was excruciating. They did a quick turnaround on it, but it was about 2 weeks total. I looked for local Line 6 Authorized Service Centers -- the closest I found was Rockford, IL, BUT (at least at that time) they ONLY worked on them if you bought the guitar from them. Dunno why they were even listed in the L6's Service Center list. The rest are on the order of 3 to 6 hours away -- mostly in major metro's.

 

My luthier set up the 2 JTV's PERFECTLY. He lowered the nut slots for better action than original in that part of the neck, He apparently reset the 69S's neck in the pocket to better line up the low and hi E strings, he got the neck in arrow straight shape, set up the bridges, set the pickups' heights so as not to mess with intonation, and provide a good tone and signal level. There is not a buzz to be found up and down either neck of the 59 or 69S. He was familiar with JTV's -- he's worked on them before. I discussed with him that I had to raise set up's on my guitars a touch after he had worked with them, as I apparently have a heavier pick attack that what he set up for me, and the strings would slap the finger board. He took that into account for my set up and it plays low and fast, but no slapping as well.

 

Ok -- as far as I'm concerned all the above work he did was what I expect for the physical guitar mechanics. Would I take my guitars to somebody I don't trust to do the right thing -- including telling me what he isn't comfortable doing? Absolutely not -- regular prized guitar or Variax -- uh uh. Unfortunately, this guy's only in town a few times a year for his elderly parents. He lives in Texas, and works for a major music store down there. When he gets back here, he gets piled on by local guitarists who get wind of it like me. I had heard of him several years ago, but he had already move to TX by then. Anyway next time he's in town I'll take him a few more to get in shape.

 

If I had a fried board or major component in my JTV. I would not have him work on that. I would also not box it up and send it off. I would probably find the and drive it to the closest L6 registered service center (won't be Rockford, IL) just so I could get a warranty on their work. My JTV's are both out of warranty now. I am comfortable with the innards, BUT I would want a warranty on the work from them. One reason I got 2 JTV's is for contingency backup situations, not just broken strings...

 

I changed the pickups in my 69S to noiseless  DiMarzio's within 3 months of having it. My preference, my choice. If it voided the warranty, that worry's behind me. Some folks don't have that comfort level, I do. It is also in what I consider to be normal electric guitar stuff. connect the new leads where the old ones were, boom -- done. Now if the switch and circuitry connected to the pickups would malfunction -- service center. Ya gotta know when to call in the pro's. Also should know where the normal guitar stuff ends and the higher tech stuff begins. The Line 6 Tech not handing out info for free is just protecting his turf, in MHO. If a set up is done wrong, the guitar may play and sound like crap, but it ain't gonna blow up....

 

My 2 cents. Talk amongst yourselves. Nothing to see here, move along, move along. These droids aren't the ones you're looking for....

 

Dave

 

This has been my stance all along, I just don't agree with some people in this topic about sending it to a luthier when it's about a major electronic component.

 

They say they won't just take out an electronic piece on the board, but just replace the board, but I've said this over, and over, and over again, that I DID that myself, and nothing happened.

 

Now, I'm not the best when it comes to repairing electronics, but I know how to unplug a ribbon cable and a few ground prongs, which is all you need to do with the guts I ordered. Didn't work, because again. it needs to be flashed by some device that only Line 6 would carry. 

 

New guts are not hot swappable, they have no data on them at all to tell the interface it's a Variax guitar being plugged in, hence you can't flash it.

 

 

 

Now that you said some information about not wanting to ship your guitar off so far, and would prefer to drive it to a close and trusted person, I get that. 

I have a service center within driveable distance, and I assumed most people would have that, unless they're outside the US.

I'm sorry I assumed that.

 

Like I said, at the end of the day,. if the luthier can truly fix it, ok, go ahead, but if you got a service center within driving distance, I really suggest just taking it there instead if it's not a basic issue.

 

 

I don't know why people can't understand that, and that I've opened up to the concept of using a luthier for basic jobs, instead, I get cruisinon2 constantly mocking me, trying to claim I'm backpedeling, then gets people to claim I'M bullying HIM for calling him a moron when I'm simply tired of all his rude sarcastic replies.

 

I have no problem with having a civilized disagreement and discussion, but making childish rude comments and then blame me for retaliating isn't going to do anything but lollipop me off.

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Interesting point -- fullcompass.com is where I have ordered some JTV parts (including the pearloid faceplate I'm waiting on) is the Madison, Wisconsin Line6 Registered Service Center -- a couple-three hours from me... I just realized this when I was posting above -- couldn't remember which one was for purchasing customers only -- (Rockford, IL) so I looked it up on the L6 service center locator....

 

Anyway -- makes some sense (now) that they'd offer L6 parts on their on-line catalog store. Seems they're the only ones who do. Clay, if you bought the 300/500/600 coffin there and still want to pursue that, maybe you should contact that service center via phone -- work out a deal with them to flash it for you or tell you what the deal is. Maybe the one you got was boogered.... 

 

Again, just a thought.

Dave

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Interesting point -- fullcompass.com is where I have ordered some JTV parts (including the pearloid faceplate I'm waiting on) is the Madison, Wisconsin Line6 Registered Service Center -- a couple-three hours from me... I just realized this when I was posting above -- couldn't remember which one was for purchasing customers only -- (Rockford, IL) so I looked it up on the L6 service center locator....

 

Anyway -- makes some sense (now) that they'd offer L6 parts on their on-line catalog store. Seems they're the only ones who do. Clay, if you bought the 300/500/600 coffin there and still want to pursue that, maybe you should contact that service center via phone -- work out a deal with them to flash it for you or tell you what the deal is. Maybe the one you got was boogered.... 

 

Again, just a thought.

Dave

 

Thanks Dave, I really appreciate that. Maybe it was. I sent it back and got a refund.

 

I'm not sure if the JTVs are any different, if they are preflashed, but I think FullCompass is actually more for the service center to order those parts.

 

 

Some people on this topic are mentioning that service centers might actually be even less experienced in electronics than Luthiers, and I can understand that. I think it depends on where you go, perhaps. The biggest issue is that one can access confidential information about the guitar, and one can't.

 

One thing that IS good about people tinkering around with these guitars, is that thanks to them, we eventually do get information about the guitar. 

I think you should leave that to people who know what they're doing and are open to doing it in the first place.

 

If you got a warranty and are just trying to fix the guitar, and especially if it's in driving distance, I have no idea why you wouldn't go to a service center.

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