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JMDamage

POD HD500X Direct line on touring !

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Hey Guys,

 

i will be touring this year starting august and i have zero experience in that. never played outside my local clubs.

i am using a LINE 6 POD HD500X, i have my tones fixed and i recorded an album with those tones and i'm pretty happy with that. i'm using studio direct mode obviously and using the amps and cab sims of the POD.

However, i'm planning to use the same setup live, go direct to the mixer, my question is how reliable is that in terms of maintaining the same sound i get from my monitors? i know each PA is different and the sound might slightly change, but how drastic would that be ? is there a way to try and maintain my sound in different venues through different PA Systems ?

Thanks for the help !

JM

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You are already well set up to go direct to the mixer(s). Your best tool to deal with different mixers/PAs and venues is probably the Global EQ that came with the latest firmware update.

 

I don't think you will find a drastic difference in sound. Your tones should sound pretty similar to the recordings with the help of a little EQ to accommodate the venue's PA and speakers. But that duty will largely fall into the sound guy's hands at the PA. I think you'll find a good sound guy can take your current tones and fit them into the mix quite well.

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Your Pod is like playing a CD through different stereos. 

It will always sound the same, but what you may hear will be slightly different based on the system that is playing it - and probably the guy running the system.

 

I wouldn't even mess with GEQ. Especially since adjusting the GEQ for your monitors will adjust the GEQ for the house sound too. 

Let the sound man earn his keep. 

 

 

******************

 

As someone who has some touring experience - 

It sounds like you aren't taking a full show with you, and are going to need to rely on different sound man/systems every night. That can brutal.  Especially if your contract doesn't specify what sort of system they need to provide.

 

Monitors are the one place that a lot of places skimp on (if they even exist). They may provide great house sound for the paying customers, but the monitor systems is like using an employee bathroom. Never use an employee bathroom at a place you like to eat, lol. So, the truth is, monitoring your own sound may be the hardest thing to maintain on any given day. 

 

It may take some getting used to. But ultimately, as long as you can hear yourself you have to stop worrying about what it sounds like to you on stage. It is a mental thing that we learn to do.

So, you may want to consider taking a small amp, something small enough to hang on the mic stand, to make sure that in a worse case scenario, you can at least hear yourself.

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Just don't forget to set your output mode accordingly, but coming from monitors you shouldn't need to change it, it

should translate well. Like silverhead mentions, use the Global EQ to compensate for the slight differences. :)

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Some advice as I use a hd500x live to a desk. Firstly test it out in the rehearsal space if possible just to make sure you cut through the mix in a live situation against the gear the rest of your band is using. Another thing (I do this) is set up dual amps. One is (L) to the desk with the full amp, the other ® is the preamp version into a poweramp pedal (ehx 44 magnum) then to a quad box on stage. This is just used as my own monitor and not mic'd. Can't always trust you will have a decent foldback. I don't bring a quad box but if there is one on stage, it's some extra insurance :-)

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Yeah pianoguy pretty much nailed everything you need to be worried about, especially the monitoring situation.  After one particular club experience my band has gone all in ear.  We even bring it when we know there is a PA because we have been shocked to many times by the crappy monitoring situations we have encountered.

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Yeah pianoguy pretty much nailed everything you need to be worried about, especially the monitoring situation.  After one particular club experience my band has gone all in ear.  We even bring it when we know there is a PA because we have been shocked to many times by the crappy monitoring situations we have encountered.

having your own in-ear set is great! if the band has their monitor mix when they walk in the door, they'll probably sound decent even if the FOH guy has tin ears, because you'll be tight and together.

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Piano guy is right on. One thing I would add: if you have a rider for back line, I would ask for a quality individual powered monitor or smallish PA cab that you alone control, so you are not dependent on getting all your comfort monitoring from the monitor guy. That's something I just couldn't leave in someone else's hands unless they worked for me and I really trusted them.

 

If you can't do that, then I would bring some small gift to every gig, and during sound check, present it to the person handling your monitors, and then tell him what you need.

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Monitors are the one place that a lot of places skimp on (if they even exist). They may provide great house sound for the paying customers, but the monitor systems is like using an employee bathroom. Never use an employee bathroom at a place you like to eat, lol. So, the truth is, monitoring your own sound may be the hardest thing to maintain on any given day. 

 

It may take some getting used to. But ultimately, as long as you can hear yourself you have to stop worrying about what it sounds like to you on stage. It is a mental thing that we learn to do.

So, you may want to consider taking a small amp, something small enough to hang on the mic stand, to make sure that in a worse case scenario, you can at least hear yourself.

+1 to that!! I have played many a gig with a 'in house' sound guy and thought the sound was dogsh!t only to be told by (reliable) friends in the audience that the FOH sound was great.

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The thing is... 

It isn't always about cheap gear and unqualified techs. 

 

When you are on playing on a big stage, with the best system... 

My monitors in my area put out the sound that I need. 

Little Jimmy, over on the home team side of the football field, has the sound in his monitors that he needs. 

 

But what happens when I dance around like I got ants in my pants, and I run into Little Jimmy's area so I can get a look at the rack on that girl? Or I run up onto the drum riser and do that little thing we do?  

See, now, all of a sudden, I can't hear myself in the mix because I am low on those monitors. 

 

Which is why IEM is nice. You can always take your personal sound with you anywhere on stage. 

 

 

Umm, but, yes, usually, in the 'bar scene' it is just more cost effiecient to skimp on monitors. 

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I just played a large stage/show

And after a great soundcheck … showtime No monitors …. at all.

Sound man asleep at the wheel  .. hey it's part of the gig!

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I don't tour but do play in a few different venues with different acoustics.  Only advise I can give is to not spend a lot of time trying to tweak your POD to accommodate each one or you'll go crazy.  As others have said, let the sound guy earn his money.  And if you don't have IEMs, then investing in a small to medium floor monitor that you control is always a nice idea.

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Just make sure you can hear yourself in the monitor. If it's not quite right, ask the engineer to adjust the EQ of the monitor if possible (more digital boards allow this). If you have an idea of the frequency to boost or cut, provide that to the engineer. They like numbers (i.e. cut everything higher than 8K). However, pianoguyy has outlined a good pitfall scenario to watch out for.

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