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jeffco01

Why not surge protectors?

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In searching for help on an issue with one of my L3S's not powering up, I've read several posts where people have been asked if they had plugged their speakers into a surge protector and then they have been told not to do that. But never once was there a reason given as to why a surge protector is a bad thing?

 

Up until now I have never heard anyone in our business saying not to use a surge protector. Usually it's just the opposite... Because of bad power/bad wiring/etc., ALWAYS use a surge protector. So I was hoping someone would chime in and explain this for me?

 

BTW, there's still no response with even the slightest of suggestions as to my downed L3S.

 

Thank you for your time,

Jeffrey

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just checking back… is there no answer to this? this has been a question asked by Line6 personnel many times, and is easy to search. Just never an actual reason for why using a surge protector is a no-no. But, before I use my system again, I'd like to get some sort of an answer that doesn't include the parent/child answer… "because I said so!"

 

Jeffrey

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So after not getting a response to this question here on the forums, I decided to just open a ticket. Took a couple of days but I finally received an answer, so I thought I'd share it with you all. Here's the quote from line6 support...

 

"Hi,

Sorry about the confusion. Those posts are a little misleading. You can use surge protectors. Those posts are referring to possible causing of failure due to a bad or low cost one. These speakers pull a lot of power and cheaper protectors will sometimes fail or cause issues. So make sure to use one that can handle the wattage the speaker will pull.

 

Thanks,

Line 6 Support"

 

Well, there it is.

Jeffrey

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Thanks for the update. I've been using surge protectors with no problems but didn't want to comment and seem like a smart a@se!! Only ever buy decent ones anyway as some of the places we play have mains that leave a lot to be desired and this kit costs way too much to risk a surge!!

What really gets me is how many places want to see the latest PAT test certs  when their stuff could do with a bloody good overhaul.

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What really gets me is how many places want to see the latest PAT test certs  when their stuff could do with a bloody good overhaul.

What protectors are you using quadcabby?

 

I assume you are UK based referring to PAT certificates! Tell me about it. I had to have my entire [nearly new - used fully just 3 times] rig tested to satisfy a hotel, only to get there and find half the sockets they expected me to plug into virtually hanging off the wall! It's the insurance companies that are insisting on it, and they lean on the venues... not covered if you don't get to see up to date certificates. The dumbass thing is that whereas the part P regs don't give a distinct/prescribed time period for retesting, the insurance companies are absolutely insisting on it being within a year and some are rejecting certs for anything over 10 months (just to be on the safe side!) and yet as we all know, a piece of electrical equipment can develop a fault between uses. All the PAT certificate does is assert that it was good on that date.

 

I take extremely good care of all my gear, not only in use, but also in transit, during setup and packdown. The rest of my band would attest to how anal I can be about how cables are wrapped/stored not to mention how I cringe whenever anyone but me is man-handling them.

 

PAT testing is all but a farce; a money grabbing exercise created by the electrical industry to furnish its members with an endless list of work!

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Hi Si,

 

Just using Belkin protectors. We use one for our electronic drum kit as well.

 

I totally agree with your views on PAT testing. I used to work in the tool hire industry and if for example a drill was used for 10 mins and returned it would have to be re-tested!! As for gear such as ours then I'm told by the guy that that does ours that it is an annual requirement and only due after the first 12 months of date of purchase. If it's less than a year old then showing the purchase receipt is sufficient to meet any insurance requirement. We did this many times in our first year of ownership.

 

I too am anal about how cables are wrapped and how the equipment is handled. If you look after it then it should last a long time. Also agree that a lot of venue electrics could do with a good make over! 

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If it's less than a year old then showing the purchase receipt is sufficient to meet any insurance requirement. We did this many times in our first year of ownership.

If only this were always true... my instance was when my gear was just 4 months old, used (as the full rig) just three times and yet the hotel (wedding gig) insisted, with no leeway despite my protestations that everything had to be on the presented certificate. Barmy.

 

Likewise the guy who did mine suggested a 12 month re-test cycle. I run everything from (up to) four plug in RCD's like these (though not this specific model) http://www.screwfix.com/p/masterplug-rcd-adaptor/63731 and have a complete powercon mains distribution rig. PAT tester had fun doing the tests on it as he'd never come across powercon connectors before. Amusing that I had to educate him, firstly on what the regs are relating to powercon AND on how to go about testing them!

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If only this were always true... my instance was when my gear was just 4 months old, used (as the full rig) just three times and yet the hotel (wedding gig) insisted, with no leeway despite my protestations that everything had to be on the presented certificate. Barmy.

 

Every time I read anything like this any desire to work in the UK again instantly disappears. They are so over-the-top there with their 'Health & Safety' obsessions it is absolutely crazy. The last straw for me was when did a classical string quartet concert in an ancient church, and the local council insisted on two huge bouncers being on the door (charged to the organisers)!!!! This was presumably in case the classical music fans forgot who they were, and where they were, and decided to start smashing the place up to the pulsing beats of Bartok. As for electrics... I recall it cost extra to have some 'authorised' dude turn up to switch the lights on, but when I asked about who was 'authorised' to turn them off afterwards, he just said, no problem - you do it.

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