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From what I can tell getting real FRFR headphones is a bit of a challenge.  Even studio quality headphones ($300+) tend to try and simulate a audiophile stereo speaker setup rather than a pure FRFR loudspeaker, so there's going to be some coloration in the output.  I suspect they could be useful in practicing, but I'm not sure I would trust them for setting up patches by themselves.  You'd probably need to tweek the patches a bit after you connected to your normal output speakers.

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From what I can tell getting real FRFR headphones is a bit of a challenge. Even studio quality headphones ($300+) tend to try and simulate a audiophile stereo speaker setup rather than a pure FRFR loudspeaker, so there's going to be some coloration in the output.

The same can be said for any two different FRFR output devices...speakers, headphones, whatever. "Pure" FRFR doesn't exist. No response will ever be completely flat. Every time you change from one box, or set of cans to another, there will be a difference. It might be very subtle, or it could be night and day, but 100% uniformity across any and all output devices just ain't happening, regardless of what claims are made about FRFR.

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True but I was talking more about the comparison between stereo speakers and loudspeakers.  I've not come across any headphones targetted at that type of sonic response.  Even top end headphones tend to be targetted more toward studio mixing which is quite different.

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My two cents:

 

- Headphones are already generally "FRFR" in the original sense of how the term was used regarding modelers. (i.e. Guitar Cab vs. FRFR)

- Even if you have near-perfectly flat-response headphones, the physics of how we hear are different in headphones vs. with speakers. (due to room acoustics)

 

One reason it's harder to mix (or create patches) with headphones is that they're acoustically isolated. Each ear only hears its one side, and there are no room reflections like you would hear in any real-world situation.

 

I also suspect that by playing sounds on speakers, the changing frequency response of the acoustic space as you move around (even just by turning your head a bit) highlights random different aspects of the sound over time, drawing your attention to things you might not notice with headphones.

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I'm thinking OP means more of headphones that'll compensate for the difference between creating tones at low volumes and then sounding totally different at band levels. IOW, the ability to create patches with the phones that'll sound the same on your high volume rig.  If there aren't such headphones already someone could make a pretty penny designing one, lol

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I'm thinking OP means more of headphones that'll compensate for the difference between creating tones at low volumes and then sounding totally different at band levels.

How'd you gather that? OP mentioned nothing about that. As far as tech goes, the are no HPs that compensate for the fletcher Munson curve

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