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Impulse responses

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Hello Guys

I'd like to start using third party impulse responses into my patches but dont really know how to start using them. I've had the helix for two months and as everyones aware theres been many updates in that time.

So when I'm building a new patch and go to the IR section and its empty is this correct or have any that may have been there now been over written.. I know there are many sites where i can buy IR's but have seen helix youtube sites about Patch building that have shown some already in there. Am I correct in thinkng that they must have been added by the owner.

Can anyone direct me to a site with free IR's to get me started and tell me if there should have been any already in the helix IR drop-down already.

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fwiw, if you didn't know, the cabs in Helix ARE IRs. It's just that they now allow you to bring in third party IRs if you want.

 

I will say this. I've messed around with a few free ones, and I like the Helix IRs just fine. Especially when you use dual cabs.

In other words, imho, dual cabs with built-in cab IRs is better than single with 3rd party.

Do not assume just because someone else HAS to spend money on additional IRs to get what they want out of Helix that you will. I don't.

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The only drawback of using dual cabs is now you have to sift through all the different mic-mic distance-cab combinations. What if the one I haven't tried yet is better than the one I just tried? And so forth and so on. On the other hand, maybe that's easier than trying to sift through thousands of IRs.

 

Or you could easily combine an IR and cab block. I do that sometimes with good results.

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The only drawback of using dual cabs is now you have to sift through all the different mic-mic distance-cab combinations. What if the one I haven't tried yet is better than the one I just tried? And so forth and so on. On the other hand, maybe that's easier than trying to sift through thousands of IRs.

 

Or you could easily combine an IR and cab block. I do that sometimes with good results.

 

I think you touch on the whole problem with choices in general. And when you have multiple choices that multiply the possibilities, you can run into analysis paralysis.

 

I focused on cabs I like, and guess what... The sound that is best for me is always, always, always... the SAME TWO CABINETS.

 

I do find that I like to vary the mike and distance and early reflections a bit, but if I have the 4 x 10 bassman cab on one side and the Dr. Z cab on the other (same favorite cabs from HD 500)... I'm done.

 

So... when you go through the cabs and find one you really like... just stop. You're done.

 

Of course, that's easier said than done.

 

Same thing with amps.

 

I am only using about 4 or 5 amps in Helix, really. (Matchless Ch1 or Jump, Bassman, /13, Z, and, just recently, the Shiva - which cleans up okay and gains up to lower gain really nice, too). I like the other Fender models and some of the lower gain stuff, too, but I could get by with just those.

 

On a lark, I spent about an hour one day going through all the amps via the factory presets for the first time since I got this 2 and a half months ago. (I also notice, btw, that some models I adored in HD 500 do nothing for me here, they are that different. Most notably, the Orange. My favorite amp in HD 500 for humbuckers, but I can't get anything I like out of it in Helix, which is cool, since the /13 and Matchless are so amazing... In fact, if this box only had the Matchless models... I might be okay!)

 

Anyway, that exercise was a big waste of time you could argue... I already know what I like, so I stick with it.

 

Not everyone does, I realize that, but if you DO know what you gravitate towards, stick with it if you actually have to make music for a real audience. You'll all be happy.

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I think you touch on the whole problem with choices in general. And when you have multiple choices that multiply the possibilities, you can run into analysis paralysis.

 

I focused on cabs I like, and guess what... The sound that is best for me is always, always, always... the SAME TWO CABINETS.

 

I do find that I like to vary the mike and distance and early reflections a bit, but if I have the 4 x 10 bassman cab on one side and the Dr. Z cab on the other (same favorite cabs from HD 500)... I'm done.

 

So... when you go through the cabs and find one you really like... just stop. You're done.

 

Of course, that's easier said than done.

 

Same thing with amps.

 

I am only using about 4 or 5 amps in Helix, really. (Matchless Ch1 or Jump, Bassman, /13, Z, and, just recently, the Shiva - which cleans up okay and gains up to lower gain really nice, too). I like the other Fender models and some of the lower gain stuff, too, but I could get by with just those.

 

On a lark, I spent about an hour one day going through all the amps via the factory presets for the first time since I got this 2 and a half months ago. (I also notice, btw, that some models I adored in HD 500 do nothing for me here, they are that different. Most notably, the Orange. My favorite amp in HD 500 for humbuckers, but I can't get anything I like out of it in Helix, which is cool, since the /13 and Matchless are so amazing... In fact, if this box only had the Matchless models... I might be okay!)

 

Anyway, that exercise was a big waste of time you could argue... I already know what I like, so I stick with it.

 

Not everyone does, I realize that, but if you DO know what you gravitate towards, stick with it if you actually have to make music for a real audience. You'll all be happy.

 

Some good advice there.

 

I like the idea of finding what you like and sticking with it. As you said, that's easier said than done to actually get to that point. But once there it's easier. A lot depends on the individual's obsessive tendencies. There's always a need in some to see what's just over the horizon or lurking around the corner.

 

Oddly, I don't have a hard time at all selecting amps. Most of them end up having very similar tonal characteristics for me. So it's easy. Cabs/mics are different. They affect the sound more than an amp and sometimes my poor little brain quickly becomes overloaded and confused, basically shutting down the decision making process.

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...Oddly, I don't have a hard time at all selecting amps. Most of them end up having very similar tonal characteristics for me. So it's easy. Cabs/mics are different. They affect the sound more than an amp and sometimes my poor little brain quickly becomes overloaded and confused, basically shutting down the decision making process.

 

THIS IS REALLY IMPORTANT!

 

It will make more difference switching cabinets than it will make switching amps in many cases, and it will often make WAY more difference switching mikes than switching cabs.

 

Hint. If your sound is harsh, just skip all the rest and go right to the ribbon mikes, which are fast becoming all I use. The way they smooth out the high end is glorious.

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I second that...the ribbon mics in the IR's are my go-to IR's. The 121 & 160 work great in tandem. I almost always run two cabs, one using a 121 (Royer ribbon mic), and the other using a 160 (Beyer ribbon mic). The two blend very well.

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The only drawback of using dual cabs is now you have to sift through all the different mic-mic distance-cab combinations. What if the one I haven't tried yet is better than the one I just tried? And so forth and so on. On the other hand, maybe that's easier than trying to sift through thousands of IRs.

 

Or you could easily combine an IR and cab block. I do that sometimes with good results.

What is the difference between dual cabs and cab + IR?

 

An IR is just a cabinet sampled with a specific mic in a specific position.

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What is the difference between dual cabs and cab + IR?

 

An IR is just a cabinet sampled with a specific mic in a specific position.

 

No difference really. Just a different way to do it than dual cabs. Instead of messing with two cabs, two mics, and positions, there's only one. Just have to pick a good IR. So it can diminish slightly, or appear to, the overwhelming amount of combinations.

 

Another reason is maybe you're looking to maximize the DSP usage but don't have enough for dual IRs, but just enough for a cab and IR.

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Matchless are so amazing... In fact, if this box only had the Matchless models... I might be okay!)

 

Anyway, that exercise was a big waste of time you could argue... I already know what I like, so I stick with it.

 

Not everyone does, I realize that, but if you DO know what you gravitate towards, stick with it if you actually have to make music for a real audience. You'll all be happy.

I agree, mostly. I'd have to have the Fenders too. They are really quite good. I've found that I really only ever use around 7-8 patches. It took me quite a while to figure out how to create an A/B footswitchable patch so I've pretty much backed off of editing for a while. When I get back to it, I'm hoping that I'll end up with only four patches.

I know I've whinged quite a bit about how some things are implemented in the UI (and I still feel strongly about it), the sounds are undeniably wonderful.

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What I do is go look at the rigs used by guitarist I really like - Matt Schofield, Mike Bloomfield, Jimmi Hendirx, Robben Ford, etc. you get the idea. See what they use for pedals and amps and learn, these are the professionals. Then I try to reproduce those setups with some of my own modifications and preferences in Helix. That's the starting point. Then I play the thing live and see how the interaction between the tone, the guitar and the audience works and effects how I play and enjoy the music. Then I adjust from there.

 

As a result, I mostly use one amp, one IR and a fixed set of effects in one patch. I get the tone changes mostly from my hands and the volume control on the guitar. This has been a very satisfying experience with Helix. I'm no longer hunting all the time for that missing tone. I just play.

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