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Looking for recommendations for JTV 69 strings.  Can someone confirm factory strings are D'Addario 10's?  I like what is on my new US 69 and am seeing NYXL's for like $12 per or $30 for a 3 pack.  

 

Personel preference for sure.  Just looking for suggestions.  

 

 

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Yes, they are D'Addario 10's that come stock on the JTV's. Strings are really personal preferences. Very few right's or wrong's, just opinions and feel.

 

If you go with lighter or heavier, you'll need to adjust your action and neck relief, or have some who knows how to, do it.

 

The other thing you will need to adjust if you change gauges, or even change brands in the same gauge will be your intonation. I'd say try your favorite brand, and if it pleases you, you're good to go.

 

I use GHS Boomer 10's on all my electric guitars, so they all feel and play about the same. Once I adjusted the intonation, I can just change the strings and then I check the intonation and adjust if need be (usually minor). It can vary from one run of strings to the next (like any manufactured product), but usually, I don't need to adjust the intonation for a new set of the same. I buy 'em in 10 packs, if I can get a deal, if not, I buy a handful of sets when I'm getting low and I happen to be at Guitar Center.

 

Dave

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Elixir Nanoweb

 

Long lasting (really long lasting), less string squeak (important with piezos)

 

I am using 11s after recommendations for improved acoustic model sounds with JTV but my fingers have got stronger and while I thought about it I doubt I can go back to 10s anymore.

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I am using 11s after recommendations for improved acoustic model sounds with JTV but my fingers have got stronger and while I thought about it I doubt I can go back to 10s anymore.

You'd be breaking strings left and right. ..;)

 

It really is true though...if you bend a lot on 11's, everything else starts to feel like cobwebs after a while.

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I was using 9's on my strat for quite a few years, but would periodically break one during a gig. Got my Variax 300 in 2005 (came with 10's), and went with my usual 9's on it, and broke them a lot more often than with my strat. I moved to 10's one time by mistake -- grabbed the wrong size at the music store. I had bought a number of sets, so figured I'd just use 'em up, but noticed my breakage went way down to practically nothing, so I kept using them. My hands got used to them pretty quickly actually, so I've kept using them since then. I don't really use my tremolo on my strat or 69S, I do hand vibrato's. It's all in what you get used to.

 

I put some heavier strings on my Tele Deluxe as a teenager back in the 70's and broke the nut on it. Just got around to having that fixed a few years ago. I've steered away from heavy strings ever since.

 

Dave

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Elixir Nanoweb

 

Long lasting (really long lasting), less string squeak (important with piezos)

 

I am using 11s after recommendations for improved acoustic model sounds with JTV but my fingers have got stronger and while I thought about it I doubt I can go back to 10s anymore.

 

less string squeak... - I'm curious whether anyone has tried flatwounds.  

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i use d'addario NYXL0942 09-42 on my 69s...
both electric+acoustic models AND mags sound super (genre:

).
previously used d'addario EXL120 9-42...

restringing from the stock d'addario 10s requires setup.

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less string squeak... - I'm curious whether anyone has tried flatwounds.

Just take a couple of throw pillows and strap them on either side of your head. The effect is the same...;)

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Just take a couple of throw pillows and strap them on either side of your head. The effect is the same...;)

Glad you found a cheaper alternative shows us some pics! :-)

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Factory strings are D'Addario XL110.

 

If you change gauges, don't forget to have the set-up checked,

and if needed, adjusted.

 

Change in gauge results in change in string tension, which can alter

set-up (relief, action, intonation, tremolo tension and pick-up distance

to the strings). Have a factory authorized service center do this, as they

will have service info access.

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I would avoid low gauge strings personally, I put on 8-38s for a laugh.... Modeling did not sound good at all, Magnetic rocked it though! Yo to the Lo!

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Have a factory authorized service center do this, as they will have service info access.

 

Line6 is virtually alone among guitar makers in holding basic setup information as a deep, dark proprietary secret.  They could give you the recommended string height, relief, pickup clearance and trem adjustment specifics but then they'd have to kill you...

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Line6 is virtually alone among guitar makers in holding basic setup information as a deep, dark proprietary secret. They could give you the recommended string height, relief, pickup clearance and trem adjustment specifics but then they'd have to kill you...

You know what the deep, dark secret is? That setting up one of these guitars does NOT involve anything mysterious at all... (insert audible gasp here)...now imagine if THAT got out. Think of all the guys at "authorized service centers" who'd end up homeless.

 

It's a guitar, not the space shuttle...proceed accordingly, everybody.

 

But for some reason, they'd rather have us believe that tinkering with ANYTHING will have the same consequences as a chimp banging on the control rods of a fission reactor with a ball peen hammer.

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I use the D'Addario nickel wound XL's, .11-.49.  EXL115 to be specific, you can grab a 10 pack for $30.  Never had a problem with D'Addario strings!

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"Line6 is virtually alone among guitar makers in holding basic setup information as a deep,

dark proprietary secret"----

 

Too many people who said they knew what they were doing,... didn't. So we had to pick up the

pieces once too many times. So it was decided not to put out set-up specs. Dealing with mag

and piezo interactions on the same guitar just complicated it.

 

One guy said he was a guitar tech, and his JTV-69 came back with the neck so shimmed, the

angle of the neck-to-body was more like a violin than a guitar. He changed the string gauges

and set the tremolo tension all wrong to where the tail of the bridge was sticking up in the air. 

 

So it was decided not to put out the set-up specs.

 

So,... sorry to kill the conspiracy theory, but,... no dark secrets, no black helicopters or men in black.

Just too many people who claimed they knew what they were doing,... and didn't.

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That is the most backwards logic I've ever heard in my life.  You realize, of course, that those inclined to get in over their heads are going to do so with or without guidance from Line6.  All you are accomplishing with this inane policy is to punish everyone else by ensuring that they're flying blind. 

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So,... sorry to kill the conspiracy theory, but,... no dark secrets, no black helicopters or men in black.

Just too many people who claimed they knew what they were doing,... and didn't.

"One guy said he was a guitar tech..."

 

And? Who cares what "one guy" did? Or a thousand for that matter...if they destroy their guitar, that's on THEM. Morons will forge ahead anyway, with or without access to the specs...it's what they do. So if you think this policy is saving anything from ending up on your bench, you're fooling yourself. You can't save people from themselves.

 

Besides, you're not gonna warranty obvious abuse anyway. So giving out the specs would cost a grand total of nothing. If you're worried about money, take a lesson from the motorcycle industry...most of those manufacturers will deny warranty repairs if they think you breathed on the chrome to rub off a dead bug.

 

Withholding basic info from the masses because of handful of idiots makes no sense at all, no matter how you try to justify it. If the rest of the world operated with this logic, we'd have to close all the libraries...information being so "dangerous", and all. Coddling the lowest common denominator is ruining our species...let the stupid be their own problem, don't make them mine.

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That is the most backwards logic I've ever heard in my life. You realize, of course, that those inclined to get in over their heads are going to do so with or without guidance from Line6. All you are accomplishing with this inane policy is to punish everyone else by ensuring that they're flying blind.

It's government logic, known as the "Mushroom Principle": Keep 'em in the dark, and feed them sh*t. Whomever is making these decisions should run for office. They'd fit right in.

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More like a couple dozen,... and that's just in North America. If it were just on, 

things would be different. No mushrooms here, and I don't use manure for gardening.

Another myth bites the dust.

 

The example I cited was a more memorable one,... unfortunately, not the only.

 

Yes, "morons will forge ahead, with or without ..."--- so I'm trying to keep that to a minimum.

Trying to keep everyone from learning the hard way. Trying to keep your gear from ending

up on my bench.

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Repeating the same thing over and over lends no validity to the content of a message. If it was ridiculous upon first utterance, it will be ridiculous after the nth repetition. Although I'm sure it makes it easier to believe after a while.

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The same could be said about believing in every conspiracy

theory that comes down the pipe.

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You're the only one babbling about conspiracies. Or am I imagining the fact you refuse to divulge basic information, readily available from every other vendor on the planet?

 

This is about voluntarily choosing to treat customers like children, who need to be supervised when playing with their toys. But go ahead and paint me as a delusional nut if it makes you feel better. Have a nice day. I surrender.

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I have to agree that not publishing specs necessary to something like guitar setup simply because of some disastrous episodes with people who probably should have taken the guitar to a tech does not appear to be a good policy. I would hope that Line6 at least provides the specs to guitar techs and luthiers. More info usually results in less problems; especially if that info is accompanied with explicit warnings and details about what the possible gotchas are and what not to attempt without the proper level of expertise. It can also include what actions void warranty service (within reason). I would encourage you to reconsider this policy and put a little more faith in the majority of your customers who could then make informed decisions about what they should and should not be attempting to adjust on their guitar. Basic setups are something that can be required on a fairly regular basis and something every guitarist without the means or desire to pay for them should learn. Even if you have the means, learning to do it yourself can get you a lot closer to your ideal setup than one done by anything but a superb tech (and there are a lot of hacks out there). Setups are expensive in my area, and for anyone with multiple guitars they can quickly become unaffordable. Any assistance regarding setup guidance and specifications is of great value. I know I will be setting up my own Variax even if I have to do it while flying blind. For anything beyond my level of expertise or that might damage my guitar, I will take it to an expert.

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Cruis,... you're one of the sharper ones here.

 

And I'm not the one who talks conspiracies, there are those who do.

And you aren't conspiracy person from what I gather,....  but there are those

out in the forum world who are.

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I have to agree that not publishing specs necessary to something like guitar setup simply because of some disastrous episodes with people who probably should have taken the guitar to a tech does not appear to be a good policy. I would hope that Line6 at least provides the specs to guitar techs and luthiers. More info usually results in less problems; especially if that info is accompanied with explicit warnings and details about what the possible gotchas are and what not to attempt without the proper level of expertise. It can also include what actions void warranty service (within reason). I would encourage you to reconsider this policy and put a little more faith in the majority of your customers who could then make informed decisions about what they should and should not be attempting to adjust on their guitar. Basic setups are something that can be required on a fairly regular basis and something every guitarist without the means or desire to pay for them should learn. Even if you have the means, learning to do it yourself can get you a lot closer to your ideal setup than one done by anything but a superb tech (and there are a lot of hacks out there). Setups are expensive in my area, and for anyone with multiple guitars they can quickly become unaffordable. Any assistance regarding setup guidance and specifications is of great value. I know I will be setting up my own Variax even if I have to do it while flying blind. For anything beyond my level of expertise or that might damage my guitar, I will take it to an expert.

 

Hallelujah, a voice of reason. More info, less problems, indeed...most things in life obey that premise. Then again, who doesn't love a good old fashioned smokescreen? And rocking back and forth in the fetal position, muttering "authorized service center" like a meditation chant is fun too. Neither one will help you fix anything, but it'll give you something to do for a month while you ship the guitar to hell and back 'cause it needs a set-up.

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Daaaaannnnnngggg!   Appreciate the input.   Just ordered a 3 pack as per the IP.   Will see how I like.

 

I do learn so much from your posts. This is a great forum.  In the end, water still flows down hill and their ain't no free lunch!

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All this back and forth on specs - I don't even bother to look them up anymore. It's all a balancing act. The "specs" between manufacturers are typically so close it's moot. Once you know how to rough in a base setup then do small tweaks/adjustments from there, you don't need specific numbers for specific guitars. Chances are you won't stop at the "factory numbers" anyway (if you do it right - which is to tweak for a specific guitar's nuances or player's preference).

 

1) Strings off, use straight edge (I use notched straight edge) to set the neck straight. I've found with string tension pulling on the straight (without tension) neck, this gets you in the ballpark for relief.

 

2) Rough in intonation if need be. Set high E string saddle to scale length from nut or half scale length from 12th fret. Pull the B saddle back a bit, pull the G saddle back a bit, set the D saddle to same as B saddle, pull A back a bit from there, pull low E back a bit from there.

 

3) Put on the strings, tune to pitch, give each string a little tug, retune, then set the action to about 6/64" on the Low E, 4/64" on the high E. If you have individual saddle height adjustment (like on a Strat), set the middle strings to the radius of the fretboard (measured using a cheap radius gauge available on eBay - don't trust the "factory spec"...it's usually wrong). If you have fixed saddle height for the middle saddles (like a Les Paul) then move on.

 

4) Stretch in your strings really well and tune back up to pitch.

 

5) Place a capo or barre your finger across the 3rd fret, and then press the string down checking the first fret. There should be very little movement (like thick paper business card movement). If it's excessive, slots need to be filed. If the string doesn't move at all and is sitting on the first fret, congratulations you get to upgrade to a Tusq nut and learn another new skill.

 

6) Now the fun part - play the thing! Make sure you hit each fret and listen for excessive buzzing. Do some heavy bending and make sure you're not fretting out. Tweak action and relief until you get it dialed in. Relief adjustments should be 1/8 turn, no more than 1/4 then wait 15-20 minutes, tug on the strings a bit, retune and try again. Typical relief starting points are 0.010" to 0.012" (barre first and last frets, check at 7th/8th frets). If you're buzzing in the upper and lower frets but not the middle, tweak the action. If you're buzzing more in the middle and not the upper and lower then tweak the relief. I have even had times where straightening out the neck has decreased buzzing. Be realistic when listening for buzzing. If you're banging the crap out of the strings with a 2mm pick you're going to get some buzzing. Some times you can get lower, sometimes you can't. Depends on the guitar and how well the fretwork is done. Some people prefer a higher action because it makes bends easier. Your shredders typically want really low action for fast runs. More personal preference stuff here.

 

7) Pickup height I like to start with 6/64" bass side, 4/64" treble side (bottom of string to top of pole piece, fretting at the last fret), then play it and make small tweaks from there. Pretty self explanatory. Tweak it until it sounds good and balanced, heavily subjective depending on your pickups, your amp, and your ears.

 

8) Once you've got everything dialed in make sure you're in tune and check/adjust intonation. Play some more, check again. Once that's done you're all set. Give it a couple days - depending on the environment and how much tweaking you had to do, you may have to make adjustments.

 

Note: Guitars with a floating trem require more work, and this has gone on far longer than I had hoped. Plenty of videos on YouTube on the subject.

 

Seems like a lot but once you've done it a few times and get some experience under your belt where you know what little tweaks are required to get the desired effect (which you really just have to have experience with), it goes by quick.

 

Note: This is not posted for the people above - they obviously know how to setup a guitar. This is for noobs searching around trying to figure out how to do it. Just get some base settings roughed in as pointed out, and tweak from there. A "factory setup" is merely a starting point. If a tech hands you a serviced guitar and doesn't make you play it before you leave so it can be tweaked if need be, he/she's not a very good tech.

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Has anyone ever used Slinky cobalt 10s on a 69s? I just got my guitar a month ago so I'm still using the factory strings. But I've always liked the cobalts.

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When was your guitar built?  There is a good chance your factory strings are years old.  Try anything and it will be an improvement.

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2 year old strings, even if barely played, will be out-performed by shoelaces. Time to swap them out...

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