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GLOBAL EQ SETINGS


stringsguitarist
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Not sure what sort of answer you're expecting here, every player's gear, music, and taste are different.

 

If you're asking what principles you might use to make that decision, I think many people try to get their presets sounding good with the global EQ flat, so they can use it to adjust for duller or or brighter rooms.

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you probably want to switch off the cab modelling

I would put an EQ block in my presets and save Global EQ for when I am having a problem and in a hurry (i.e. at a gig) where I have to carve some EQ across all my patches at once

I don't use it as a matter of course

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Global EQ is for "fixing the sound in the room". Nobody's setting will work for you unless they are playing with your hands through your rig with  your guitar in your room.

Personally I don't even use the global EQ. The sound man takes care of that for me.

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If you're running into a traditional amp, I'd recommend starting with no Global EQ. I feel like the power amp and guitar cab do their own EQing.  Once you've tweaked it a bit, if there are still frequencies that don't sound good to you, use the global (or an EQ block) to help.

 

I like using Global EQ when I go direct since I'm usually coming through different speakers every time. Some are brighter or some have too much low end, so I use the EQ to compensate.  

 

Another use could be if you switch guitars and you'd like to continue using the same patches.

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Yep I concur!  - Global EQ is to adjust to the room you are in.  Each room is different.  Bigger stages are pretty much the same - but some small rooms and pubs are incredibly different to each other.

 

My home setup has my amps up against a wall.  That makes the bass louder than it would be if they were in the middle of a regular stage.

 

I can either have the global EQ flat/off at home and then boost the bass when I get to a venue like that, or use the global EQ to cut the bass at home and then set it back flat for the gig.

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Since I use IR's for all of my presets, I've adopted what I call the OwnHammer EQ curve, and have my Global EQ set accordingly...I leave it on all the time, and I don't worry about environmental issues at clubs, that's the sound guy's job, just as if I had a mic'd up cabinet. I only need to make sure the sound to my monitors is where I want it.

Here's what Kevin from OwnHammer writes:

 

SOUNDING LIKE A GUITAR TUBE AMP

With the files contained in this library there is a very quick, simple step that can be taken to duplicate the sound of a guitar tube power amp with the Presence and Depth set to 0.

To replicate this sound, following the cabinet IR loader add an EQ with a parametric bell curve set to -3 dB at 400 Hz. Adjust the Q/bandwidth to roughly where the edges of the curve start to make the initial cut around 100 Hz on the low side and 2 kHz on the high side. If necessary, adjust the Q/bandwidth to taste from here to best suit your sound source and tonal preference. 

 

Rock on,

Scott.

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