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Relay G10 USB input poor design

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I have a home made 9v battery box feeding all of my pedals. One of the outputs goes through a 9v to 5v converter, and into the G10 via a USB C /micro USB converter cable.  So it's pretty simple to temporarily put in an inline USB voltage/current meter between the battery box and the USB C end of the converter.  They go under names like "USB Tester Voltmeter" or similar and start around £8/$10, and increase in cost depending on what extra functionality you want. (bigger/colour screens etc)

 

I looked at the VoodooLabs website again, and the table that shows the PowerPlus 2 specifications.  Yes, the Voltage is regulated on the SAG ports. Their table shows the 4-9V setting listed at a Max of 100mA, so I said regulated, which was a bit confusing I guess. Sorry about that. Like you, I don't know if that 100mA really is the max across the range, or if they just forget to print a range in the table.

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The main concern about these approaches is you are still using the mini USB connector on the G10. This socket is not robust enough for serious use. It is not anchored to the case in any way, held in place only by its solder joints, and its plane of connection is parallel to the insertion force of the plug. The inevitable result of this is to lift the socket off the board with regular usage. Installing a standard Boss 9V co-axial socket, and internal voltage conversion solves all these problems at once. S www.redtapemusic.biz

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I agree that the micro USB socket is weak, and I wouldn't have used this method without some safeguards. If you look at my post and picture on the previous page from 27th June last year, you'll see that I heavily reinforced the area where the micro USB plug goes in to the socket. It has almost a cm (deep) of hot melt glue surrounding the entire plug, spreading out more than a cm all around. It's not going anywhere, in/out, or up/down, it's extremely solid. I could have installed the 9V to 5V converter inside and fitted a standard dc socket as other people have done, but as it was a brand new replacement unit, I didn't want to go drilling into the case, until I'd tried this method. It's obviously not as neat as fitting a converter internally, but it was quick, pretty straightforward, and did mean I could easily return it back to it's original state if I had to send it back for other warranty work. There are two additional minor benefits (I've found and used since) to having the converter external. One, I can unplug the converter, and optionally power the receiver/charge the transmitter using pretty much any USB source, and two, as I'm running my pedal board from a large battery pack, the output from the converter is always a useful emergency back up for things like charging phones.

 

If people feel technically competent, their G10 is out of warranty, and they either aren't intending selling it on, or think/assume the mod won't negatively affect the sale (which it probably wouldn't) then the internal mod is probably the best option or them.  

 

My option is middle ground, as it's still using a 9V to 5V converter, albeit externally, but doesn't require opening up, or modifying the case/receiver.

 

The simplest ways of "fixing' this (for those with lower technical confidence), and continue using the original USB power supply it came with, are to either use the magnetic USB connectors, as some people have, or use a short usb extender lead and plenty of hot melt glue. Personally, I don't trust the strength of that USB socket over time with even the light pressure required to disconnect the magnetic connectors, but it's certainly going to greatly reduce any connect/disconnect strain, and pretty much eliminate any chance the socket will get torn from the board by the cable itself being stepped on. 

 

Basically, the idea is to take as much strain off that micro USB socket as possible, and there are various ways to do that. There are many suggestions in this thread, from simple to more complex.  As long as people know the pros and cons of each method then that's all good imo.

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Ultimately, I bought one of these: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07L3VRMZC/ref=ppx_od_dt_b_asin_title_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I plug it into the backside of my Voodoo Lab power supply and it powers both my MS-3 and G10. I never disconnect the G10 USB cable from the receiver, so I don't stress about stress.

It's odd, but it seems near impossible to find a pass-through U.S. AC plug/outlet with an onboard USB connector. But there are tons of AC plug converters that do it. So I'm using that, without actually doing any AC converting, using the U.S. male prong and the U.S. female receptacle options simultaneously while using a USB port for the G10.

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18 hours ago, dlabrecque said:


I plug it into the backside of my Voodoo Lab power supply and it powers both my MS-3 and G10. I never disconnect the G10 USB cable from the receiver, so I don't stress about stress.
 

 

It's not just plugging/unplugging though. If the cable is stepped on/tugged on at the wrong angle, it can break the socket from the board. Just giving you a heads-up on that. If you are going to leave it unmodified, at least consider one of the magnetic connectors a few people have mentioned.

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That looks rather a bulky solution to get a USB 5v from 120 / 240 volts. The receiver's current requirements are not very high, a small iPhone / iPad type power supply would do the job perfectly well, or alternatively one of the 9V to 5V regulated converters I used for the hardware modification sitting in line between the Voodoo Lab and the mini USB connector? S www.redtapemusic.biz

 

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I have a Line 6 *10 on my repair bench. For the doubters, it’s bent inside.I was going to see about replacing the mini-usb. As I attempt to pull it apart, it seems like it is going to break. Has anyone had this unit apart? Or has anyone successfully replaced the mini-usb?

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16 hours ago, mikeskory said:

I have a Line 6 *10 on my repair bench. For the doubters, it’s bent inside.I was going to see about replacing the mini-usb. As I attempt to pull it apart, it seems like it is going to break. Has anyone had this unit apart? Or has anyone successfully replaced the mini-usb?

See my post on the previous page. 

 

https://line6.com/support/topic/22109-relay-g10-usb-input-poor-design/?page=5&tab=comments#comment-256136

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If you are opening the G10 you need to first remove the silver nut on the top jack socket, then take out the screw under the bottom label then run a plectrum around the joint in the case to release the clips. I would not recommend trying to replace the mini USB, it’s a flawed design and the tracks on the board may not survive the resoldering. I would recommend replacing it with the standard Boss type 9v coax socket, and a 9volt to 5 v converter board as described above. More robust and far more reliable, and the usb data transfer function remains intact.

Best Wishes
Steve
www.redtapemusic.biz

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Hey SNIPEDOGUK! I had all nuts & screws out and the plastic bottom tabs lifted but I felt like it was taking too much pressure. If it was mine, I would of gone for it. LOL! Anyway considering what used ones go for and that a new model had a better power supply system I advised him to get a new one. I know what you mean on USB replacement. Sometime they go smooth but sometimes I end up botching something and then have to run tiny jumpers. Thanks again!

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Hi all!

 

Thanks for the excellent info here - mod pictures, milliamp measurements et.c..!

 

Thought I might just add my mod picture too. I found a really tiny (like 10.000 times smaller that jmod757's beast! :D ) switch regulator board, that still does 1.5 A. Only have a Swedish link for it:
https://www.electrokit.com/produkt/switchregulator-step-down-0-8v-17v/

 

The board was small and light enough to "float in the air", being connected by some old resistor pins directly to the DC jack. (I was worried that tape/glue might come loose inside the box after some time..)

 

I can't say the mod was very difficult - but if you have never soldered in your life, I would probably stay away from it.

 

Regards,

 

Lars Lengberg

 

20190914_190114.jpg

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On 9/20/2019 at 7:03 AM, larslengberg said:

 

Thought I might just add my mod picture too. I found a really tiny (like 10.000 times smaller that jmod757's beast! :D ) switch regulator board, that still does 1.5 A. 

 

 

Nice job -- thanks for your contribution!

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I am amazed to find that this unit is still being shipped with this stand-out design weakness.

 

I bought my unit in Dec 2018. It's been stationary for most of the time, but I have taken it to different locations a few times. The USB jack always felt loose and it never seemed to properly go in the socket. I suspected it was a fragile connexion. I was right, as mine now intermittently cuts out.

 

I have been careful with the unit, but it seems that no amount of care can prevent these connexions from failing after being unplugging and plugging them in a few times.

 

I am really disappointed. Everything else about the device is fantastic, but if the thing won't charge, or unexpectedly cuts out, then it's not fit for purpose.

 

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