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hag01

Keyboard amps and the pod

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I understand that the Pod is simply a digital amp without a speaker.

Should it work well with a keyboard amp?

 

I understand that the Pod should be connected to a stereo amplification, but most of the keyboard amps today are stereo, aren't they?

 

And one more very important question: how loud are those keyboard amps?

I mean, If I cennect the Pod to a 15 watt keyboard amp, will it be loud as the Line 6 Spider 15, or the Peavy Vyper 15?

If not, then bummer...I really need a small mobile keyboard amp that could reach those volumes...

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"the Pod is simply a digital amp"

WRONG

 

There is no "power" section. It is not an amp. 

 

It is an amp modeler. You will still need a method to hear the device. Some form of amplification/speaker combination. 

============================================================================

 

But, to answer the question: 

Yes, a keyboard amp will work fine. In fact, keyboard amps are preferred over guitar amps because they tend to be "flat". 

 

As to the stereo part: 

1. depends on what you buy. 

2. the best stereo sounds come from separated systems --- one on each side of the room. 

 

As to the volume part: 

It depends on what you buy. 

 

 

 

One of the nice thing about a lot of keyboard amps is the fact that they are "wedge" shaped instead of square shaped. 

Because they are pointing up in the air right at you, they don't need to be as loud as a guitar amp that may be shooting straight out at your feet. 

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"the Pod is simply a digital amp"

WRONG

 

There is no "power" section. It is not an amp. 

 

It is an amp modeler. You will still need a method to hear the device. Some form of amplification/speaker combination. 

============================================================================

 

But, to answer the question: 

Yes, a keyboard amp will work fine. In fact, keyboard amps are preferred over guitar amps because they tend to be "flat". 

 

As to the stereo part: 

1. depends on what you buy. 

2. the best stereo sounds come from separated systems --- one on each side of the room. 

 

As to the volume part: 

It depends on what you buy. 

 

 

 

One of the nice thing about a lot of keyboard amps is the fact that they are "wedge" shaped instead of square shaped. 

Because they are pointing up in the air right at you, they don't need to be as loud as a guitar amp that may be shooting straight out at your feet. 

OK, thanks for your answer.
 
I need a keyboard amp strong enough for small gigs with the Pod hd500x.
What do I mean small?
Like a really small hall, or a coffee shop, with quit music like smooth jazz, or backing a pop singer(just me and a singer), or a solo performance of me playing holydays songs, somthing like that.
That should be enough for me.
 
Oh, and I need it to be very light weight and compact, because I travelling with my equipment through public transportation.
 
The only keyboard amp I found that is portable enough is the Behringer Ultratone KT108.
 
But it is only 15 Watts, can it be loud enough for my needs?
 
And in the specs it's writen that it's got 2 channels, it's mean it's stereo amp, right?
 
 
Link to the official product page:

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If the gig is small, use headphones. Use IEMs. Plug direct to the PA and hear yourself through the backside.

 

I don't use any amp for any sized gig. But certainly for the small/quiet ones you don't want an amp messing with the mix.

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Keyboard amps will work well with the HDs but 15 watts is a practice amp. 

If the singer is going in on the HD mic input as well you will struggle with volume

especially if there is a packed audience (bodies are a bit like sand bags; they soak up sound)

A hundred watt PA is not very loud either but would suit small venues.

But as you are public transporting it, there are powered speakers you can carry with the rest of your gear on a small trolley. 

That said, the keyboard amp might be enough if it is stereo 2 x 10''  speakers and 15watts rms each side in a small somewhat empty room; 15 watts peak forget it.

 

EDIT: I got curious and looked up your amp. It has 2 channels mixable but not stereo and only an 8" speaker. It is a bedroom practice amp.

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How about using an Alto TS210 ?

Great sound, small, light and powerful. 

10" speaker, 2 channel in, 1 MIX output, 600W RMS power, 1100W Peak.

 

I use the 12" version, TS212.  Only 13.5Kg. and I love it!

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I used a POD with a Roland KC for years and it worked to my ears. I treated myself to a DT25 for a 'significant birthday' and was blown away by the full sound. It makes the sound I got from the keys amp sound very thin.

 

That said, when I gig now I go strate to the PA (Altos) and monitor with in ears....

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Oy vey. 

 

If a gig is that f'n small --- do not use a damn amp.

 

I would say no matter how small the gig, you still need some kind of amp to hear the POD.

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OK, how about that the Roland CM 30 CUBE Monitor?

 

It 30W Monitor, also very light weight, I can't understand from the specs if it's stereo or not(due to poor knowledge in sound and the science behind it).

Is it good for my needs?

Here the official product page:

https://www.roland.com/us/products/cm-30/specifications/

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If the venue is capable of giving you signal back into your stage monitor, you should need no amp on stage.

 

If you have IEM's, even better.

 

For live, consider consolidating your output to mono.  Live Sound Reinforcement is seldom in stereo.  Summing to a mono output will solve any phasing issues that may present themselves.  

Even if you give the a stereo pair of outputs, they're likely only going to put them out from FOH panned down the center.

The lower the stage level, the better the fidelity overall.

The loudest acoustic instrument on stage sets the minimum stage volume level, which is usually the drums.  Minimizing the SPL on stage is better overall, hearing, better control from FOH to provide a mix that comes from the mains, not a combination of the mains and the stage volume.

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