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Recording with Pod Hd Pro X tips please

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Sup guys,

 

I know many of you have probably seen a million posts like this but Id like to get as much input as humanly possible for learning purposes and to know if Im doing anything wrong.

 

Okay so first off I started building a small home studio and I just swapped my hd500x for a hd pro x because I wanted to be a all in one desk studio with nothing blocking my chair as the hd500x would do.  Anyway, Im extremely new to recording but I have a pretty good understanding gear wise and software wise.  Currently Im running the hd pro x to the two balanced inputs on the back of my AI and then running two balanced, one to each monitor.  The AI i have is a focus rite saffire pro 14 and two m audio bx5's and I'm also using Studio One 3 for my DAW.  

 

now Ive spent countless hours making my own tones and when direct monitoring them they sound as close to the sound in my head, but when recording (in the DAW i have the saffire as the sound card) it picks up all this feedback and muddiness and even trying to begin mixing from there seems impossible (also I'm even more new to mixing so its pretty much trial and error for me).

 

Id love any feedback / tips I could get on what to do or what not to do or to switch certain thing in my set up so on and so forth, or If i need additional gear, you name it.  Also running all on a Mac pro.  thanks and I enjoy hearing some great tips

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I'm in this same position mate, i've just bought a Pod HD Pro X, i have no idea how to set it up for best results, i used Guitar Rig 5 Pro, which was used as a plug-in in my DAW, i've also created a post on here, but no one is forthcoming as usual, very annoying, as it appears no one wants to help newbies out!

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Try recording the HD direct via USB. You will need to connect your monitors to the HD.

Going from the HD to another interface introduces an additional stage of A/D conversion while also potentiating affecting your gain structure. 

(That is not to say you cannot achieve good result by running the HD's analog outs to another interface.)

 

If you own more than one interface I highly recommend investing in a mixer, doesn't need to be anything extravagant. 

Then you can connect you monitoring solution to the mixer and have multiple sources feed to the mixer without the need to swap cables when switching between interfaces.

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I'm in this same position mate, i've just bought a Pod HD Pro X, i have no idea how to set it up for best results, i used Guitar Rig 5 Pro, which was used as a plug-in in my DAW, i've also created a post on here, but no one is forthcoming as usual, very annoying, as it appears no one wants to help newbies out!

 

Yeah, not as much traffic in this forum these days, if you want I can move this thread to the HD forum which is more active.

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I’ll try and respond more this later...at work now and not much time.

but first off (and this is pure preference from experience), I would ditch studio one and use something else. Even garage band! I’ve had nothing but problems with presonus software crashing my systems. Anyway...

Not sure what you are using for your AI, but if it is a mixer or anything else with a built in preamp, you’re going to have to do a lot of tweaking to get a good direct sound. The pro x has an amazing cabinet emulator and direct recording is incredibly easy.

i use a presonus usb audio interface straight to my MacBook that works great and has very little latency (just don’t use the software! lol). From there, you should be getting whatever tone you are dialing in on your pro x. Monitor from the MacBook outs for best overall tone and mix.

A lot of the patches on the pro x can be very bassy, so you might want to run a high pass on it to compensate (There’s a good little ‘quick’ article on low/high pass filtering here: https://theproaudiofiles.com/audio-pass-filters/ ). Try and not rely on headphones too much when mixing as it is not going to be a true mix and you can hear a LOT more in the headphones. Use your monitors and watch your peaks. I like to normalize to about 85%, but a lot of people frown on normalizing.

Trust your ear! If it sounds good to you and you can hear everything...you’re probably pretty close or even right on!

Keep an eye on frequencies as well. A bass drum and a bass guitar share similar frequencies, so you’ll want to keep them away from each other by panning. Vocals and keys are similar, guitar and everything else shares similar frequencies! Lol

I’m no master recording engineer, but I’ve been doing it for 30+ years and have a pretty good idea on what works and what doesn’t. Trial and error is the best tool for figuring out how this stuff works. When I was learning, I didn’t have the internet to rely on for resources, so figuring out what works by my mistakes was huge.

Again, I’ll try and post more later. I don’t have a LOT to share, but hopefully enough to get you started.

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wow...didn’t realize how old this post was! Lol Hopefully you’ve learned by now! Haha

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