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Any acoustic amps in any update? Or acoustic options?

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As I am updating to version 2.12 I was wondering.... there's always new amps with every update, Guitar and Bass. More than I'll ever need or even have time to try out. But are there any acoustic amps due in the future OR there are some already and I missed it?

 

In any case, besides acoustic IR's what else would be a good option to just use the Helix with a regular acoustic guitar?

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I don't really get these requests for acoustic amps. Most of what's happening in them, specialized EQ, Compression and Notch Filtering, is done in the preamp so I can understand if folks want an acoustic guitar preamp. That would be really handy. The rest of the components of those "acoustic" amps - the power section and LF and HF drivers are not much different than any powered PA speaker. The amps themselves as a whole, don't have any special character that's all that desirable. There's no need to model the whole amp.

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I don't know if an official acoustic amp would solve this but I have a JTV Variax and I find the acoustic sims to  be a bit anemic. They work and are convincing but I would love something that would give them more fullness or body, for lack of a better word. I've tried all of the EQ and mic preamp options. And many of the Guitar/Bass amp options. I have an old Variax and I had an X3 which had alot more mic preamp options. I had a Variax/mic preamp combo for the old acoustic sims that sounded fantastic to me so I know Line 6 can do it.

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I don't know if an official acoustic amp would solve this but I have a JTV Variax and I find the acoustic sims to be a bit anemic. They work and are convincing but I would love something that would give them more fullness or body, for lack of a better word. I've tried all of the EQ and mic preamp options. And many of the Guitar/Bass amp options. I have an old Variax and I had an X3 which had alot more mic preamp options. I had a Variax/mic preamp combo for the old acoustic sims that sounded fantastic to me so I know Line 6 can do it.

How about trying an acoustic IR to liven them up?

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i tried that with mine and it really didn't work.. it's along the same lines as running a virtual cab into a real cab.. too much cab! lol

Did you try with a compressor? maybe the LA one, with the mix down at about 60-70%.. it thickens it up a bit here.. and make sure to try going into one of the returns if you are just using pure acoustic sounds without needing electric.. it sounds a bit fuller thru a return

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It is time already, bring on a couple preamps, amps, and cabs dedicated to acoustic.

Pre-amp, OK...that might be useful.

But what good is a modeled acoustic cabinet? One's only hope of a convincing acoustic tone is running into an FRFR speaker...if you're already doing that, then you've already got what you need. The rest is EQ. Running a modeled acoustic amp speaker into an actual FRFR speaker would be rather redundant. And running a modeled acoustic speaker into a regular guitar cabinet would be a complete waste of time, as that cab's native frequency response would undo that of the modeled cab anyway.

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We have the vintage tube mic pre or whatever it's called. All ya need.

Get a free IR or buy the ones from 3 Sigma.

 

Use some para EQ.

 

A teeny bit of studio comp.

 

Add your verbs and delays if you must.

 

But, I stress that if you want a natural sound, put the IR first (it represents the miked guitar, so it should be first in the chain), then the mic pre, then the EQ and the comp last. I bet you it'll sound better than any acoustic preamp you've ever used.

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How about trying an acoustic IR to liven them up?

I've done that. I have Freman's patche bundle and that helps but not what I'm looking for.

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Here's more to try.

 

The Famous old Taylor ones. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/f2qdh9jtcl6s5cv/AACRlEt-UVeLAhuvV4YwMY7Wa?dl=0

 

Wes Hunter's collection. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/f2qdh9jtcl6s5cv/AACRlEt-UVeLAhuvV4YwMY7Wa?dl=0

 

The ones I made from DTAR Mama Bear (these need to be at -6db, and although they sound less "real" imho, they absolutely cut through a mix).

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B5YMP7cdVF-LTWE5TkFrb0ZTUGc

 

ALL of those are free.

 

I am hoping to make some based on the old Yamaha AG Stomp I still have and will try and do that soon.

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Here's more to try.

 

The Famous old Taylor ones. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/f2qdh9jtcl6s5cv/AACRlEt-UVeLAhuvV4YwMY7Wa?dl=0

 

Wes Hunter's collection. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/f2qdh9jtcl6s5cv/AACRlEt-UVeLAhuvV4YwMY7Wa?dl=0

 

The ones I made from DTAR Mama Bear (these need to be at -6db, and although they sound less "real" imho, they absolutely cut through a mix).

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B5YMP7cdVF-LTWE5TkFrb0ZTUGc

 

ALL of those are free.

 

I am hoping to make some based on the old Yamaha AG Stomp I still have and will try and do that soon.

I'm pretty excited to try some of these out with my acoustic. Any in particular that you would personally recommend? I do the typical singer songwriter type of solo gig with a low-end Martin w/a soundhole pickup

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I'm pretty excited to try some of these out with my acoustic. Any in particular that you would personally recommend? I do the typical singer songwriter type of solo gig with a low-end Martin w/a soundhole pickup

 

 

The ones I almost always use are the ones created by 3 Sigma Audio. Costs 10 bucks per set. MORE than worth it and FAR better than any free ones I or others have made.

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The ones I almost always use are the ones created by 3 Sigma Audio. Costs 10 bucks per set. MORE than worth it and FAR better than any free ones I or others have made.

I will check those out. I have heard that these are really good

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Pre-amp, OK...that might be useful.

But what good is a modeled acoustic cabinet? One's only hope of a convincing acoustic tone is running into an FRFR speaker...if you're already doing that, then you've already got what you need. The rest is EQ. Running a modeled acoustic amp speaker into an actual FRFR speaker would be rather redundant. And running a modeled acoustic speaker into a regular guitar cabinet would be a complete waste of time, as that cab's native frequency response would undo that of the modeled cab anyway.

 

Fundamentally I do agree with your point regarding a preamp versus an amp and little need for an acoustic cab but... This issue has come up before. I do like the idea of not just a preamp for acoustic guitar but also a full blown amp or two including cab just to have some alternate sounds for the acoustic. I have actually found the "Jazz Rivet 120" amp to be more useful than the "Tube Pre" preamp for amping acoustic guitar.  Not sure why, just got better results that way.

 

My thinking is there are a plethora of acoustic amps on the market why not provide a couple of models of them. However, I have to agree that the acoustic usually sounds best direct to the PA with a little processing and effects so a good preamp or amp with its EQ targeted towards acoustic guitar would suffice in many/most situations. A very clean cab or two targeted towards acoustic use, similar to the acoustic IRs out there such as the ones 3Sigma produces, might be useful occasionally for a little extra flavor, particularly for being able to quickly switch EQ curves by assigning a different mic. 

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maybe with a feedback control.. i have a zoom preamp unit that has that and it does come in handy sometimes

 

 Yes, absolutely.  I still cannot see how modeling the power section and the speakers of an acoustic amp are going to do anything to improve one's acoustic sound within the Helix. Those last two components, unlike their counterparts on an electric guitar amp, are designed to have no character at all.  Their job is to amplify the signal coming from the preamp in an uncolored a manner as much as possible... just like the Helix's signal chain if it had no effects blocks activated.

 

I can think of only one exception to this but I can't remember the amp make's name.  It used a spruce top like that on an acoustic guitar as the actual speaker. That cab might be worth modeling. I just wish i could remember its name...

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 Yes, absolutely.  I still cannot see how modeling the power section and the speakers of an acoustic amp are going to do anything to improve one's acoustic sound within the Helix. Those last two components, unlike their counterparts on an electric guitar amp, are designed to have no character at all.  Their job is to amplify the signal coming from the preamp in an uncolored a manner as much as possible... just like the Helix's signal chain if it had no effects blocks activated.

 

I can think of only one exception to this but I can't remember the amp make's name.  It used a spruce top like that on an acoustic guitar as the actual speaker. That cab might be worth modeling. I just wish i could remember its name...

This is true in theory but not so much in the real world of analogue. I have an Acoustisonic  from fender that adds a lot of character to an acoustic. It tames the quack of the pick ups both from the preamp and from processing through the power section out of the speaker. the power section of amps impart a sound character to all guitars not just electric. the end result is a much more lush and pleasing sound vs a bright  and biting sound from just a preamp alone into a PA. That is true for both tube and solid state acoustic amps. So yes acoustic players that are used to the sound that they get from an amp design for that instrument are not going to be happy with what is coming out of the Helix currently. I agree with the jazz rivet comment, it seems to like the acoustic but it would be nice to have a couple of options in the Ac guitar world. Including preamp models that are popular with Ac players. Some higher end tube pre's like Avalon 737, Sebatron axis, ADL And not surprisingly a Manly Vox Box sound incredibly good with ac guitars. When pushed they round of the transients in a very pleasing and subtle way without sounding over driven or crunchy. Something that most electric guitar amps that are tube don't really do. A typical recording and live path for ac players is their stage amp and stomps combined with a really good direct through a tube pre slightly driven to add air detail and sustain. In fact having a couple of those higher end pre's both tube and transformer based would be an excellent addition to the helix as they would benefit everyone. Neve's and Api's sound really good pushed just before break up too. They are as much apart of the sound as the amp's being played through. its a big reason why the the third party Ir's sound so good to everyone, They add that flavor that the generic super clean modeled cabs in the Helix lack. It's the same with solid state acoustic amps and their power sections. Does this clarify the subject a little? We totally need more everything in the Helix.

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This is true in theory but not so much in the real world of analogue. I have an Acoustisonic  from fender that adds alot of character to an acoustic. It tames the quack of the pick ups both from the preamp and from processing through the power section out of the speaker. the power section of amps impart a sound character to all guitars not just electric. the end result is a much more lush and pleasing sounds vs a bright  and biting sound from just a preamp alone. That is true for both tube and solid state acoustic amps. So yes acoustic players that are used to the sound that they get from an amp design for that instrument are not going to be happy with what is coming out of the Helix currently. I agree with the jazz rivet comment, it seems to like the acoustic but it would be nice to have a couple of options in the Ac guitar world. Including preamp models that are popular with Ac players. Some higher end tube pre's like Avalon 737, Sebatron axis, ADL And not surprisingly a Manly Vox Box sound incredibly good with ac guitars. When pushed they round of the transients in a very pleasing and subtle way without sounding over driven or crunchy. Something that most electric guitar amps that are tube don't really do. A typical recording and live path for ac players is their stage amp and stomps combined with a really good direct through a tube pre slightly driven to add air detail and sustain. Make sense?

 

 

It makes sense, and I had an acoustasonic as a matter of fact.

 

But it's typically not what your audience hears anyway, as it's usually serving as a stage monitor.

 

And in my experience, I can get a better sound for my audience using IRs and the Vintage Mic Pre and a little comp and eq than I ever could get CLOSE to with acoustic preamps/amps.

 

That said, the next best experience I've had was with an old Yamaha AG Stomp (I bought it new in the late 90s). I tried to make IRs of what the "mic modeling" does to the sound in there, but it doesn't translate well. 4 bands of sweepable EQ, nice Yamaha reverb and very good compression.

 

It's the one piece of outboard gear I will not sell even though I rarely use it now.

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This is true in theory but not so much in the real world of analogue. I have an Acoustisonic from fender that adds a lot of character to an acoustic. It tames the quack of the pick ups both from the preamp and from processing through the power section out of the speaker. the power section of amps impart a sound character to all guitars not just electric. the end result is a much more lush and pleasing sound vs a bright and biting sound from just a preamp alone into a PA. That is true for both tube and solid state acoustic amps. So yes acoustic players that are used to the sound that they get from an amp design for that instrument are not going to be happy with what is coming out of the Helix currently. I agree with the jazz rivet comment, it seems to like the acoustic but it would be nice to have a couple of options in the Ac guitar world. Including preamp models that are popular with Ac players. Some higher end tube pre's like Avalon 737, Sebatron axis, ADL And not surprisingly a Manly Vox Box sound incredibly good with ac guitars. When pushed they round of the transients in a very pleasing and subtle way without sounding over driven or crunchy. Something that most electric guitar amps that are tube don't really do. A typical recording and live path for ac players is their stage amp and stomps combined with a really good direct through a tube pre slightly driven to add air detail and sustain. In fact having a couple of those higher end pre's both tube and transformer based would be an excellent addition to the helix as they would benefit everyone. Neve's and Api's sound really good pushed just before break up too. They are as much apart of the sound as the amp's being played through. its a big reason why the the third party Ir's sound so good to everyone, They add that flavor that the generic super clean modeled cabs in the Helix lack. It's the same with solid state acoustic amps and their power sections. Does this clarify the subject a little? We totally need more everything in the Helix.

Sorry, but I totally disagree. For acoustic guitars, what processing is happening at the power section level that can't be done far more effectively in the preamp section? Yes, the Acoustasonics reduce the quack... via the preamp section - not the power section. The quack has to be handled at the input by the preamp. Anything being done to condition the final output of the power section is still being done at a preamp level voltage - before the final output stage so the reality is that it's still happening at the preamp.

 

I feel I need to bring attention to the the latter half of your post, which is pretty much dedicated to... Preamps - not power amps and speakers.  Because for acoustic guitars, the preamps are where it all happens.

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I used to support the addition of acoustic amps to the model range - for acoustic guitars like steel strings, classical nylon etc. 

 

But have now changed my mind. 

 

The purpose in my mind - of a good acoustic amp - say like the AER - is not so much to ADD colour - "tone" - via more harmonics, "warm" tube transfer-characteristics etc -  but rather to merely present the tone inherent in the original instrument clearly - overcome some of the tonal EQ issues when amplifying a steel string in rooms with varying acoustics.  And then finally - the biggie - usually overcoming the inherent sound of PIEZO's  since  for most of its time the amp is being plugged in directly into the acoustic guitar. And then make all this become.... LOUD. 

 

 

So what would one need to achieve this ? 

 

1)     A powerful CLEAN NEUTRAL UN-COLOURED AMP. What is most "clean" in a helix patch ?  the total absence of ANY amp block. period. And just put the HELIX through a neutral un-coloured stereo power amp. Arguably this would be solid-state since they arguably can be designed to be the most clean of all amp types. And at the same time not draw huge power - as do class-A tube amps. ( of course solid state amps can be class A too )

 

2) a set of tone controls - i.e. EQ preamp stage - that doesnt "colour" the guitar sound - except to take away any coloration of the PIEZOs - and maybe add back the natural sound of the hollow acoustic resonator. 

 

3 ) a decent speaker system with a fuller range - FR. Or something close. 

 

 

The solution for this is not a new dedicated amp-model block - but instead merely a good preset that has NO amp or even PREAMP in the chain - just one or more EQ blocks, some impulse responses - at least TWO:  

 

  one to remove the piezo artefacts and reintroduce the real acoustic sound of the guitar body itself.

 

the others  to EQ the final sound for the room or taste of the performer - and for the speaker cabinet being used.  It could be a "combo" cabinet or simply a PA monitor - or actually the PA itself in many situations !  

 

We already have all this out there !

 

So what i'd rather have Line 6 do - or a third party - is come up with a collection of HELIX presets along with a set of suitable IR's  DEDICATED to steel strings. 

 

And..... clearly in my case -  also a separate presets collection - dedicated SPECIFICALLY to the acoustic models  in the Variax JTV range. 

 

Something like this did exist - and was i recall put together by the Line 6 team for Variax acoustics in the Pod HD 500.

 

Maybe just time for L6 to do the same for  the HELIX.  

 

 

No new amp model required :)

 

POSTSCRIPT - it is possible i guess that there might be a better EQ block design tailored to the characteristics of an acoustic guitar that would more easily get a good acoustic sound.  But this would be a new HELIX EQ model - NOT a new "amp" model. And maybe to have some kind of guitar-body-type  selector option in it - so one could select the type of guitar - parlour, nylon, Dreadnought etc..  and the EQ would automatically adjust..

.................  but then again - merely giving us separate presets - one or more for each different kinds of guitar body would achieve the same ends... so.. dunno

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POSTSCRIPT - it is possible i guess that there might be a better EQ block design tailored to the characteristics of an acoustic guitar that would more easily get a good acoustic sound.  But this would be a new HELIX EQ model - NOT a new "amp" model. 

 

 

What do you possibly need that the Para EQ can't already do, though? Seriously?

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What do you possibly need that the Para EQ can't already do, though? Seriously?

 

I think what he's proposing is a set of presets designed to optimize the sound of specific types of guitars.  Certainly it can be done manually with the Para EQ but having helpful presets from which to start wouldn't hurt.

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What do you possibly need that the Para EQ can't already do, though? Seriously?

 

True, between a para EQ and even the graphic EQ you do have quite a lot of EQ shaping power but there is an ease of use when an EQ is provided that is tailored to a specific instrument, for example the Mesa Boogie EQ provided for electric guitar. I agree with others that an EQ specifically tailored to acoustic guitar would be a great addition in addition to preamps/amps just for acoustic. In lieu of that you just need to find the correct EQ yourself, a more arduous process and one I must admit I rarely am as successful with as the sound that for example the AG Stomp is able to get quickly and easily with a minimum of adjustment.

 

My acoustic guitar sound is the one thing I am still wrestling with after a year with the Helix, it is good but not great. It was exponentially simpler to dial in spectacular tones for my electric.  I would be the first to admit that I seem to be missing some magic piece of the formula for how to perfect my acoustic sound through the Helix even though I have read amsdenj's excellent posts as well as others on the subject, purchased 3Sigma acoustic IRs, tried downloading presets from users (none of them worked for me even after tweeking), and spent many hours/days working on my acoustic tone. I can get a good acoustic sound through the Helix but not one yet that rocks my world. The Helix is more than flexible enough to get a fantastic tone for acoustic but it still appears that some preamps/amps and EQ  targeted specifically for acoustic could make it at lot easier. To me this is more about ease of use and minimizing required tweeking than what the Helix is capable of, I am absolutely confident that in the right hands the Helix can already provide stellar acoustic sounds.

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I still think that a multi band compressor could really help tame the piezo quack.  If you notice, proper EQ and playing gently on a piezo equipped guitar can yield fairly good and convincing acoustic sounds.  However, as soon as you start to dig in, that's when that Aflack Goose shows up and only in the mids - around  800 - 1.2 kHz.  If you pull those frequencies down, you lose the woodiness when playing gently - double-edged sword here. With a multi band compressor, you can keep a tight rein on those specific frequencies and maintain more of the warmth and woodiness.  Dynamics plays a huge part in acoustic guitar sounds and I think too many are too focused on using just a just static EQ solution to a dynamic problem.

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I still think that a multi band compressor could really help tame the piezo quack.  If you notice, proper EQ and playing gently on a piezo equipped guitar can yield fairly good and convincing acoustic sounds.  However, as soon as you start to dig in, that's when that Aflack Goose shows up and only in the mids - around  800 - 1.2 kHz.  If you pull those frequencies down, you lose the woodiness when playing gently - double-edged sword here. With a multi band compressor, you can keep a tight rein on those specific frequencies and maintain more of the warmth and woodiness.  Dynamics plays a huge part in acoustic guitar sounds and I think too many are too focused on using just a just static EQ solution to a dynamic problem.

 

 

I agree, although I've been able to tame the quack with EQ alone rather successfully...

 

...that said, stick a really great IR in there and all the problems are solved at once. With a few of the 3 Sigma ones, I don't even need to do any eq dips more than about 2 - 5 db...

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True, between a para EQ and even the graphic EQ you do have quite a lot of EQ shaping power but there is an ease of use when an EQ is provided that is tailored to a specific instrument,...

 

HAVE to disagree. Once we learn how a parametric EQ works... it's dead simple.

 

1. boost a band all the way.

2. pan over the frequencies until you find the one that sounds awful. (DO THIS IN THE ROOM YOU PLAY IF YOU CAN!)

3. Cut that band by 3 - 5db and adjust width to taste.

4. Lather, rinse, repeat for the other bands.

Every room and every guitar and every situation is different, so fixed bands would simply not be as effective. Something along the lines of what the Mesa/Boogie EQ does (not a fan, btw, but that's me...) for acoustic would be counter-productive, and if you are going for the best results possible, not only potentially harder to use, but also more frustrating.

 

I can eq an instrument in less than 30 seconds on just about any board, or in this case in Helix.

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HAVE to disagree. Once we learn how a parametric EQ works... it's dead simple.

 

1. boost a band all the way.

2. pan over the frequencies until you find the one that sounds awful. (DO THIS IN THE ROOM YOU PLAY IF YOU CAN!)

3. Cut that band by 3 - 5db and adjust width to taste.

4. Lather, rinse, repeat for the other bands.

Every room and every guitar and every situation is different, so fixed bands would simply not be as effective. Something along the lines of what the Mesa/Boogie EQ does (not a fan, btw, but that's me...) for acoustic would be counter-productive, and if you are going for the best results possible, not only potentially harder to use, but also more frustrating.

 

I can eq an instrument in less than 30 seconds on just about any board, or in this case in Helix.

Good tip and I am very familiar with parametric EQs and that method and have been using it for years; still has not helped me achieve tonal bliss for acoustic guitar on the Helix yet. For now, I am going to continue to essentially use the Helix as I have been to switch to my acoustic when required with a little EQ, compression, reverb, chorus (now and then), delay thrown in for extra flavor, and a footswitch boost for leads. Perfectly usable this way just think there might be room left yet for the Helix to cater a bit more to the acoustic. As I have stated in jest before as I doubt it will ever happen, just make a preset and add whatever is required to emulate what the Yamaha AG Stomp did as Line6 is now a Yamaha company. I may not know exactly what the Helix needs to perfect an acoustic sound but I know it when I hear it and the AG Stomp had that mojo.

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What do you possibly need that the Para EQ can't already do, though? Seriously?

 

 

Its quite possible one needs nothing more.   Except maybe the way knobs on such a customised EQ tuned to acoustic guitars might just make it a little easier to do minor tweaks for more treble, more mid, more low-end  in a manner suited to acoustic guitars that a generic Para-EQ  might not- or just involve more time to tweak - more expertise even - with EQ-ing such guitars that  non-studio engineers might take a bit of training to get to. 

 

But in essence i agree.  It would be more about usability - getting to good acoustic sounds - quickly.

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I'm also curious about how different EQ-circuit topologies or pure-dap algorithms might effect this whole EQ question. 

 

For example ( and this has been discussed before i think ) there are zero-phase-shift  DSP algorithms available if one does pure DSP type EQ - whereas different kinds of DSP models of conventional analog filters, baxandall etc etc introduce some element of phase-shift.   And some affect phase-shift to different extents dependent on the frequency. 

 

Dunno.

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I think what he's proposing is a set of presets designed to optimize the sound of specific types of guitars.  Certainly it can be done manually with the Para EQ but having helpful presets from which to start wouldn't hurt.

 

 

correct.

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Btw, don't know if anyone else encounters this issue when using an acoustic with the Helix but one of the main reasons I would like to see preamps/amps catered to acoustic is that I find the gain structure to be lacking when I don't use one. When I try to use the one existing tube mic pre or an amp like the Jazz Rivet it helps with the gain structure but also introduces frequencies I find less than pleasing that then have to be EQ'd out. Yes I can crank up the gain on the compressor, EQ, or output block but it would be nice to have some more gain and EQ flexibility via a preamp or amp specifically targeted to getting a great acoustic sound. The EQ on good acoustic amps tends to be catered to the needs of an acoustic guitar. The frequency bands, Q, cut/boost, etc. are not the same as the EQ on electric guitar preamps/amps. One additional note, an acoustic preamp/amp also allows you to have a 'Drive' parameter that is usually more gentle than the one found on an electric guitar amp and catered to give you a bit more grit or punch with your acoustic sound without making it sound thin and brittle.

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I agree, although I've been able to tame the quack with EQ alone rather successfully...

 

...that said, stick a really great IR in there and all the problems are solved at once. With a few of the 3 Sigma ones, I don't even need to do any eq dips more than about 2 - 5 db...

 

I agree that taming the quack is absolutely doable with EQ, but retaining the woodiness while taming the quack is quite another challenge - even when using really good IRs. Again, I believe it comes down to dynamic control of certain frequencies and both EQs and IRs are static filters that won't be able to really effectively reduce the problem as well as a really good multi band compressor.

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We have the vintage tube mic pre or whatever it's called. All ya need.

 

Get a free IR or buy the ones from 3 Sigma.

 

Use some para EQ.

 

A teeny bit of studio comp.

 

Add your verbs and delays if you must.

 

But, I stress that if you want a natural sound, put the IR first (it represents the miked guitar, so it should be first in the chain), then the mic pre, then the EQ and the comp last. I bet you it'll sound better than any acoustic preamp you've ever used.

Hi Peter, sound very interesting to me what you suggested.

 

I have a JTV89 and a Yamaha RGX721GD, considering I'm playin' them through a Peavy Classic 50 all valve power amp and a Laney 2x12 cab, the acoustic sim from JTV is ok for me (refining sound with EQ and COMP) , but I tried the Yamaha with different IRs and found no way to sound acoustic-like.

 

I will try your signal chain but I'm asking myself why I didn't think that by myself cause it's a very logical path for emulating acoustic sound using IR and an electric guitar   :)  :)  :)

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I agree that taming the quack is absolutely doable with EQ, but retaining the woodiness while taming the quack is quite another challenge - even when using really good IRs. Again, I believe it comes down to dynamic control of certain frequencies and both EQs and IRs are static filters that won't be able to really effectively reduce the problem as well as a really good multi band compressor.

 

Multi band compressors rock, what a great tool! I always use them when mixing live sound if available.

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We have the vintage tube mic pre or whatever it's called. All ya need.

 

Get a free IR or buy the ones from 3 Sigma.

 

Use some para EQ.

 

A teeny bit of studio comp.

 

Add your verbs and delays if you must.

 

But, I stress that if you want a natural sound, put the IR first (it represents the miked guitar, so it should be first in the chain), then the mic pre, then the EQ and the comp last. I bet you it'll sound better than any acoustic preamp you've ever used.

 

I will have to give this a try. It would never have occurred to me to set up the components in my signal chain in this order.

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