Jump to content
Thurston9

Wireless Headphone option for practicing

Recommended Posts

I get that, I'm usually standing when I'm practicing stuff I already know, too. I don't wander too much, though. If Line 6 could use their digital wireless tech for a stereo IEM that would be SWEET. As long as they don't go proprietary with the output of the bodypack, you could use whatever cans you wanted. 

People has asked about them doing this for YEARS now. Hopefully they're on it.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe because I used to play semi-pro, maybe because my first teacher told me to, I almost ALWAYS stand up and move around when I play. And even just sitting down, wires are a PITA. Standing FEELS like Rock'n'Roll! Sitting down feels like sleepy time.

 

Completely agree with this and I'm sick of headphone wires catching on bits of my guitar while I wander about a bit.

 

I also wrote to Sennheiser, after 10 days and a reminder I got this reply:

In regards to your request, we would like to let you know the following information:

Apologies for the long delay, the latency time for these headphones is 21.5 milliseconds.

 

Thank you for being patient.

 

Regards,

Aman Lall

Sennheiser Service Team

 

I think, taking the price into account, (£300) it's not going to work for me, I've tried 21ms on a simple delay block placed in front of a fairly uncomplicated chain and it felt a tad uncomfortable and slightly distracting.  I must admit it was on the cusp, but overall, for the money, it's just not good enough for me personally.  Gutted.  :(

 

-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After some hunting around I found the Steelseries Siberia 800 'Gaming Headphones'. They apparently boast 16-17ms latency and are around half the price of the RS185.  I've seen a few posts on various forums from guitarists saying they're OK for playing, latency wise, so I may give them a go. 

 

Anyone else tried them?

 

-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a pair of Sony MDRRF985RK... $100. They are good enough for practice, and I can't detect any latency. They sound good but not great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Andy1175 - They told me 45ms. I thought that was way more than I was experiencing, but with no practical way to disprove it, I wasn't gonna argue.

 

Then they told you 21.5(.5?)ms, which seems more like my perception.

 

But i'm thinking, if we can get somebody else to ask them, maybe we can get it down to under 10ms, which should be good enough for even the pickiest among us!

 

I may get my free set after all! :D

 

Keep us posted if you try that gaming set.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Andy1175 - They told me 45ms. I thought that was way more than I was experiencing, but with no practical way to disprove it, I wasn't gonna argue.

 

Then they told you 21.5(.5?)ms, which seems more like my perception.

 

But i'm thinking, if we can get somebody else to ask them, maybe we can get it down to under 10ms, which should be good enough for even the pickiest among us!

 

I may get my free set after all! :D

 

Keep us posted if you try that gaming set.

 

    That's a great idea, if we keep at it, we'll end up with negative latency, we'll be able to hear the notes before we play them. bouncing.gif

 

I'll probably get a pair of the Siberia 800s, so yeah, I'll keep you posted.

 

-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a complete novice.  However, for the past 10 months, I have been using my Helix with a Line 6 G30 transmitter and Sennheiser HDR 120 (approx. $120 US) analog signal with (what I read online to be) 1 to 2 ms latency.   Walk all around my very small house and get (what I consider very good sound quality no noticeable latency at all).   I never have to stop to recharge  the headphones (sometimes playing straight through for a few hours).  The only time I get interference is when I'm in the kitchen playing and my wife turns on the microwave or if a mirror gets between me and the headset transmitter or maybe the G30.    I would highly recommend if you are on a budget, don't need to stray more than a room or two away from the headset transmitter and would like minimal latency.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a complete novice.  However, for the past 10 months, I have been using my Helix with a Line 6 G30 transmitter and Sennheiser HDR 120 (approx. $120 US) analog signal with (what I read online to be) 1 to 2 ms latency.   Walk all around my very small house and get (what I consider very good sound quality no noticeable latency at all).   I never have to stop to recharge  the headphones (sometimes playing straight through for a few hours).  The only time I get interference is when I'm in the kitchen playing and my wife turns on the microwave or if a mirror gets between me and the headset transmitter or maybe the G30.    I would highly recommend if you are on a budget, don't need to stray more than a room or two away from the headset transmitter and would like minimal latency.

 

Thanks for the suggestion, something else to consider.  They seem to have been replaced by the RS120 II, I think they're basically the same but upgraded.  My problem with the RF headphones I tried was hiss, but it sounds like you don't have a problem with that, right?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Andy1175

 

Thanks for the clarification on the updated RS 120 II.  I've had my 120 HDRs for a couple of years.  

 

Once I properly tune into the headset channel that I have my Helix "Phones" output directly connected to, I have not had any problems with hissing unless I get too far away from the headset charger/transmitter (like going outside the house and walking 15-20 feet away).  

 

Please Note: I have two chargers/transmitters for two headsets I own (located in the same room).  One is connected to the television and other is connected to the Helix.  I don't know if this is somehow doubling my signal strength.  I would think not, as each transmitter is broadcasting a different input signal.  In fact, if turned on, I can dial-up the sound coming from the TV on an alternate channel on my headset and listen to TV rather than what I am playing on the Helix (with no cross-talk between the two).

 

The headset will automatically disconnect from the channel if the input signal is silent for about two minutes.  So if you stop playing , you may get startled when your silent signal suddenly becomes a rather loud hiss.  A quick strum of the guitar reestablishes the connection.  

 

I do have one other/different hiss-type issue.  But it only seems to happen with one of the Helix tones that I use called  "Ambient Clean".  I get a faint crackling sound that slowly builds and gets increasingly louder if the signal volume from my playing is not loud enough (or non-existent).   The crackling builds to a point where it sounds like you are frying a pound of bacon.  A quick punctuated strum stops the crackling.  The only way to keep the bacon from frying is to keep the signal volume up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info architector.  I've been a bit put off by some of the reviews of the newer RS120s, a lot of people who had the same ones as you and then bought these new ones, seem to be experiencing some tuning-in and hissing issues, so I think I'll give them a miss, unless I get a chance to actually try them out in a shop.

I spent a few hours yesterday playing with a 17ms delay to try and determine whether I could get used to the Siberia 800s enough to still enjoy playing, I could put up with it if necessary, but it did detract from my enjoyment, so it looks like I'll just have to put up with the wires for now.  Unbelievable really.  :(

 

-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Setup for sennheiser rs 185 rf wireless headphone system.

 

If using the sennheiser rs 185 rf wireless headphone system, what are your suggestions for connecting the left and right RCA jacks from the pedalboard to the wireless transmitter?  Guitar Cable to RCA mono converter. Does this affect latency?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to post a super low-end (and marginal workaround) for the problem, at least just for practicing around the house...  I have a simple little setup just for tinkering and wanted to go wireless for heaphones..  

 

I have the G10 for wireless guitar but the headphones are the problem. 

 

I have a nifty bluetooth transmitter and low latency supported heaphones.. but I had the latency problems like everyone else. It was an interesting experiment playing with the delay...  It was shocking how hard it was..  

 

I dont have the money to get a real solution.. but I have a lot of gadgets laying around..   I was able to utilize an FM transmitter and a tiny Sansa Sport MP3 player (which has FM).   It gets me mobile and I can wear my headphones of choice.    The biggest problem with this kind of thing is that the FM transmitters are susceptible to interference..   but my rig isnt going anywhere..  I was able to find the 'sweet spot' for the transmitter to get the best possible signal..  (noise is always going to be there.. and if you can get it down to a level that can be ignored, you can be relatively happy with such a setup).

 

If you have the parts around to try such a setup you might give it a try. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I purchased the Sennheiser Wireless 185 from Ebay second hand, and connected it to my pedal board after the Trio Band Creator that has a headphone line out. Used you can get a Sennheiser Wireless around 125 so its a great deal and with the open back you still hear ambient noise so your not isolated from the environment. I experienced no latency issues with the Sennheiser.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

20 to 30 ms is getting into slap-back echo territory...way too much to play with (unless you're willing to "learn" how to be terrible ;) ). It'll drive you nuts.

 

 

it does sound like quite a lot to me.  I love my G10. if a decent v low latency wireless headphone solution arrives - i'm in though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info architector.  I've been a bit put off by some of the reviews of the newer RS120s, a lot of people who had the same ones as you and then bought these new ones, seem to be experiencing some tuning-in and hissing issues, so I think I'll give them a miss, unless I get a chance to actually try them out in a shop.

I spent a few hours yesterday playing with a 17ms delay to try and determine whether I could get used to the Siberia 800s enough to still enjoy playing, I could put up with it if necessary, but it did detract from my enjoyment, so it looks like I'll just have to put up with the wires for now.  Unbelievable really.  :(

 

-

 

to be frank though -   playing guitar thru the helix on cans - wired or not...   is a little like making love to a woman with not just one condom on but two.

 

hate using cans. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wireless Guitar Practicing: My "Home" rig uses the Line 6 G30 and Sony WH-L600. This is the least expensive pro solution out there. G30 is what it is, you can find the reviews on that in other places, perfect for home use. 

 

The Sony WH-L600 are awesome. Turn off the Theatre mode, Digital 2.4GHz Transmission, Less Than 1ms Latency. "Closed Back" headphone design so only you can hear them. No Receiver Pack Required, built into the headphone. Great Dynamic Range with very little compression. Wide Frequency Response for "Play Along" applications. This is a single channel IEM Solution for under $300, that competes with $1K IEM systems. The only down side is that Line 6 Didn't make it.

 

I've tried so many other headphones out there. All of the Sennheiser RF Solutions (RS175/185) and yes there is an annoying 30ms of Latency, not acceptable for IEM. The low end RF TV monitors all drop out or Compress the Cr@p out of your tone. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, mgeorge_68 said:

Wireless Guitar Practicing: My "Home" rig uses the Line 6 G30 and Sony WH-L600. This is the least expensive pro solution out there. G30 is what it is, you can find the reviews on that in other places, perfect for home use. 

 

The Sony WH-L600 are awesome. Turn off the Theatre mode, Digital 2.4GHz Transmission, Less Than 1ms Latency. "Closed Back" headphone design so only you can hear them. No Receiver Pack Required, built into the headphone. Great Dynamic Range with very little compression. Wide Frequency Response for "Play Along" applications. This is a single channel IEM Solution for under $300, that competes with $1K IEM systems. The only down side is that Line 6 Didn't make it.

 

I've tried so many other headphones out there. All of the Sennheiser RF Solutions (RS175/185) and yes there is an annoying 30ms of Latency, not acceptable for IEM. The low end RF TV monitors all drop out or Compress the Cr@p out of your tone. 


With this font, I thought you were inviting us all to a wedding... :-)

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, mgeorge_68 said:

Wireless Guitar Practicing: My "Home" rig uses the Line 6 G30 and Sony WH-L600. This is the least expensive pro solution out there. G30 is what it is, you can find the reviews on that in other places, perfect for home use. 

 

The Sony WH-L600 are awesome. Turn off the Theatre mode, Digital 2.4GHz Transmission, Less Than 1ms Latency. "Closed Back" headphone design so only you can hear them. No Receiver Pack Required, built into the headphone. Great Dynamic Range with very little compression. Wide Frequency Response for "Play Along" applications. This is a single channel IEM Solution for under $300, that competes with $1K IEM systems. The only down side is that Line 6 Didn't make it.

 

I've tried so many other headphones out there. All of the Sennheiser RF Solutions (RS175/185) and yes there is an annoying 30ms of Latency, not acceptable for IEM. The low end RF TV monitors all drop out or Compress the Cr@p out of your tone. 

 

I couldn't find a spec that listed latency. Got a link?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A repost from another thread as a cheap option:

 

I saw this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uXTZNY5Ta-o

 

and figured for $50 it was worth a shot. Much lower latency than Aptx-LL bluetooth. It actually works well at home in close range, but I can't speak to it in a gig situation. For that I'd probably pony up the $$ for a pro solution. Not the most high fidelity solution for a full mix, and it's mono, and clunky with the unneeded 1/4" plug and no clip, but it's cool to be untethered when practicing. The above caveats regarding 2.4GHz apply. I'd like to see a 5.6GHz version of this, since my cheapo 5.6GHz unit has good range and hasn't given me any interference grief.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi guys. Thanks a lot for all the information gathered in this thread. 

I tried the RS120 and the sound quality is really awful even for practicing. 

 

 

So I would like to test the following: I just found this cheap stereo transmitter on Amazon: 

 

https://www.amazon.es/dp/B0875ZDT99/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_EPxjFbAZX8KED

 

My plan is to use them in the reverse way they are designed to, so to send audio from the amp output to the headphones (wired).

 

Basically I'll use G10 os similar from the guitar output to the amp input and this stereo transmitter from the amp output to the receiver on my pocket. There I will connect a small jack female to female adapter to a pair of standard iPhone wired earpods.

 

What do you think of this idea guys? I'll post results in a couple of weeks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/3/2017 at 12:58 AM, jeremyn said:

Pipe organists in a cathedrals and big churches have to deal with it when the pipes are 150' away from the console. They basically have to concentrate on their fingers/feet and ignore (or embrace) the delayed sound coming back to them 150ms later. That leads to slower passages with lots of legato, and tempos that are related to the inverse delay time.

This pretty much nails it, if possibly unintended:

If you're a pro and used to it you can learn to play with high latency, just as you can learn to ride a unicycle, hold your breath for minutes, swallow sharp metal objects etc.

For the non-pros among us, avoid latency. Don't fall into the "if I can't perceive it, it's not there" trap. For a graphic illustration why this mindset is flawed, think of lead poisoning, it's not perceptible until you're, like, 75 % dead :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/13/2020 at 9:48 AM, jester700 said:

A repost from another thread as a cheap option:

 

I saw this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uXTZNY5Ta-o

 

and figured for $50 it was worth a shot. Much lower latency than Aptx-LL bluetooth. It actually works well at home in close range, but I can't speak to it in a gig situation. For that I'd probably pony up the $$ for a pro solution. Not the most high fidelity solution for a full mix, and it's mono, and clunky with the unneeded 1/4" plug and no clip, but it's cool to be untethered when practicing. The above caveats regarding 2.4GHz apply. I'd like to see a 5.6GHz version of this, since my cheapo 5.6GHz unit has good range and hasn't given me any interference grief.

 

I think this is a great approach. There are some perfectly decent, especially just for practicing, wireless setups that can be had inexpensively off Amazon and adapted to this purpose. Just avoid Bluetooth if you don't want latency. Even Bluetooth 5.0 still has perceptible lag. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

For those still searching for the wireless headphones option I add my thumbs up to the guy who introduced the Sony WH-L600's into the mix.

I took a gamble and just got a pair and have to say I'm extremely pleased. They are not that cheap but the sound is really good compared to what I have used in the past. Latency? I can't really discern anything - there may possibly be a tiny amount but nothing that affects your playing.

In the past for practice I used a cheap pair of wireless non digital Sony's but the sound wasn't great. They gave up then I went to a pair of Sennheiser RS120's. These recently failed hence I was looking for another option. The RS120's sound was awful especially for distorted sound and the headphones easily slipped off as they lay flat across you ears.

Glad I found the topic on the forum and got put onto these SonyWH-L600's - I can certainly recommend.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I purchased the Sennheiser RS 185 and connected it to Neunaber Iconoclast, Delay and Reverb are in Stereo and it make silent playing a dream for late night jamming. This follows up to my earlier post from 2017 and I have had this setup for over 2 years now. I tend play with at least a little reverb and delay, even when dry,  I do not hear any latency. I ordered the Boss Wireless Headpnones, through Guitar Center over 7 months ago and they are still on Back Order. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, kringle said:

Thought I'd put these here. The Boss waza-air are headphones specifically designed for guitarists.. These would be the best you can get.  they ain't cheap. but the are the best.

 

https://www.boss.info/us/products/waza-air/

 

I was intrigued by these when they came out...I know there were some initial complaints complaints about the position of the amp "drifting" to one spot in the sound field after a few minutes of use. Perhaps it's something that's since been rectified via a firmware fix? Either way, it's an interesting toy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello there!)

I've been looking for a wireless solution for wireless guitar playing at home for a very long time. I have a audio interface Behringer U-Phoria UM2. I connect a guitar to it via a wire and headphones via a wire and use the ASIO driver. The total latency from touching the string to the sound output to the headphones (taking into account the processing by plug-ins) is 10-12 ms, which, according to most, is the limit of the acceptable latency for monitoring your playing.
 

To wirelessly send the signal from the guitar to the interface, I found a solution, this is Yamaha THR or Boss Katana Air with built-in receivers and their proprietary transmitters for guitars that do not have a latency, but there is only a JACK connector for monitoring output.
 

I never found a solution for wireless signal reception from the audio interface. Radio systems are too expensive (starting at $ 400) and bulky + you need to hang a radio receiver for headphones on a guitar strap (which is not very convenient for me). There are also Bluetooth headphones, but they need a Bluetooth receiver that is inserted into the computer's USB connector (which does not suit me, since I use an audio interface with a jack connector). Recently I found for myself Jack-Bluetooth an audio transmitter that allows from audio interfaces through the Jack, to translate the signal to bluetooth headphones, but the question remains, how big is the latency there? And are there such headphones (earbuds, earplugs), complete with a branded Jack-Bluetooth transmitter, for minimal latency?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bluetooth was never intended for real-time monitoring of musical instruments... it was designed for phone calls and passive listening. My advice is just live with wired headphones... it's really not that difficult to do, and it's far less of headache than trying to jury-rig Bluetooth device(s) into a setup something that might yield barely acceptable latency, if you're lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Arararasha said:

Recently I found for myself Jack-Bluetooth an audio transmitter that allows from audio interfaces through the Jack, to translate the signal to bluetooth headphones, but the question remains, how big is the latency there?

You can measure the latency yourself. All you need is a mic and some software to visualize a recording. Put the mic very close to the headphones, then pick a note on the guitar while recording. Then you can take a look at the beginning of the wave form and get the time both signals are shift. Add the time for the acoustic wave traveling through the air from your guitar to the mic (3ms/m) and you got the latency.

This should be easy with just a phone and an app. Or a laptop with a DAW or Editor like Audacity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We rehearse remotely using Jamulus (5 piece band) and that involves about 35-40 ms latency, we got used to it pretty quickly as the alternative was not to rehearse together at all so I guess your acceptance of latency you  personally find acceptable with wireless headphones.is always going to be a trade off.

 

I did try the RF Sennhiesers a few years ago and the hiss got annoying, went back to wired but with a braided headphone extension cable and nice 250 ohm headphones for home, works fine for me ! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Schmalle said:

You can measure the latency yourself. All you need is a mic and some software to visualize a recording. Put the mic very close to the headphones, then pick a note on the guitar while recording. Then you can take a look at the beginning of the wave form and get the time both signals are shift. Add the time for the acoustic wave traveling through the air from your guitar to the mic (3ms/m) and you got the latency.

This should be easy with just a phone and an app. Or a laptop with a DAW or Editor like Audacity.

That's what I did, but I wrote that I measured the total latency and it was 10-12 ms. Now I want to be wireless, because hardwired… to self-destruct...
If you know what I mean)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK guys!!! I just win this question! Just search for "wireless analog headphones" on amazon or sameOK guys!!! I just win this question! Just search for "wireless analog headphones" on amazon or same. And you will found it, not laggy as f@ck bluetooth standart, but another more faster same 2,4 ghz wifi standart analog transmitor with jack/trs connection without any latency! Sennheiser they did it for a long time, even 10 - 15 years ago to watch TV, it's strange that no one began to miss out on so many useful developments!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Arararasha said:

OK guys!!! I just win this question! Just search for "wireless analog headphones" on amazon or sameOK guys!!! I just win this question! Just search for "wireless analog headphones" on amazon or same. And you will found it, not laggy as f@ck bluetooth standart, but another more faster same 2,4 ghz wifi standart analog transmitor with jack/trs connection without any latency! Sennheiser they did it for a long time, even 10 - 15 years ago to watch TV, it's strange that no one began to miss out on so many useful developments!

 

If only! From Amazon (Artiste and other similar):

 

These wireless 2.4GHz RF headphones work with a low-latency supported RF transmitter for minimum audio delay 32-40ms (human ear undetectable) for an advanced audio experience. Wireless stereo headphones ideal for watching TV, gaming or PC.

 

That's way too much latency.

It's pretty much the same as the Sennheiser RS185 (which I have).

 

If you've found some that SPECIFY 10ms or less, post an actual link.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, rd2rk said:

32-40ms (human ear undetectable)

 

 

 

Lol... sure, if you're deaf.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, cruisinon2 said:

 

Lol... sure, if you're deaf.

Heh. To be fair, the marketing of these is usually around syncing audio to video, so that folks on their sofas don't get a delay when watching movies. And for that it's fine. But for playing instruments? ick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, jester700 said:

Heh. To be fair, the marketing of these is usually around syncing audio to video, so that folks on their sofas don't get a delay when watching movies. And for that it's fine. But for playing instruments? ick.

 

Yup... that's the problem. Re-purposing tech for activities other than those for which they were designed often fails miserably, lol. All of these solutions are fine for passive music listening, movie watching, and phone calls... for these applications a 40ms delay is of no consequence. But for real-time monitoring of a musical instrument that same 40ms (if you're lucky) is an eternity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, rd2rk said:

 

If only! From Amazon (Artiste and other similar):

 

These wireless 2.4GHz RF headphones work with a low-latency supported RF transmitter for minimum audio delay 32-40ms (human ear undetectable) for an advanced audio experience. Wireless stereo headphones ideal for watching TV, gaming or PC.

 

That's way too much latency.

It's pretty much the same as the Sennheiser RS185 (which I have).

 

If you've found some that SPECIFY 10ms or less, post an actual link.

 

Where you found about 32-40 ms? Its not bluetooth, its wi-fi standart, so its have about 3-5 ms latency max... 802.11b,  802.11g or  802.11n, I don't know for sure,  but the latency is the same as on your wireless gamepad from consoles or a laptop with a smartphone connected to a wifi router, it does not increase much compared to a wired connection.
P.S.: I starting hear latency in about 8-10ms... Check it when at the same time I played direct monitoring (DI signal) and listened to the output from the DAW.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Arararasha said:

Where you found about 32-40 ms? Its not bluetooth, its wi-fi standart, so its have about 3-5 ms latency max... 802.11b,  802.11g or  802.11n, I don't know for sure,  but the latency is the same as on your wireless gamepad from consoles or a laptop with a smartphone connected to a wifi router, it does not increase much compared to a wired connection.
P.S.: I starting hear latency in about 8-10ms... Check it when at the same time I played direct monitoring (DI signal) and listened to the output from the DAW.
 

 

That was cut and paste from the mfr's own description on Amazon.

 

Here's cut and paste from Sennheiser support's response to my query about the RS185:

 

Latency occurs in all wireless headphones however the technology being used to create the wireless signal does affect how much latency is caused. For example a Radio Frequency (RF) model (like an IEM monitoring system) has a latency of approximately 3 m/s whereas an 8-FSK digital model (like the RS 165/RS 175/RS 185) has a latency of approximately 45 m/s. Usually the delay (even at the 45 m/s level) is not discernible and hence goes unnoticed when watching TV, but can produce an echo effect if being used in conjunction with wired or RF microphones/ instrument connections

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just noticed a 2.4GHz wireless guitar transmitter/receiver setup on the market. This one's stereo and has 3.5mm stereo plugs, plus the plugs fold up. This might be a decent bet for the "cheapo home grown IEM" thing. I might try one. 12ms latency. Not pro gear, for sure - cheap & cheerful.

 

There are a few rebadges of it. This one's $40 US, and nobody's complained that it doesn't play with active pickups yet:

https://www.amazon.com/LEKATO-Wireless-Transmitter-Receiver-Rechargeable/dp/B08FDQ2VHW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...