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mileskb

My Experience Unboxing my JTV-89F

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Hi,

  I was going to do a video, but in the long run I'm glad I didn't cause after a lot of wow, nice, cool, neat.. there was WTF !!!!  and Geeez!!!

 

  • The fit and finish of the guitar itself is great.  First impressions (although I have held one before) are things like nice build, nice paint, nice features.  I think I may even like the Tremolo as it feels a bit nicer than a standard Floyd Rose and I'm a Kahler guy.
     
  • It was boxes nicely, the "soft case" is actually pretty nice, not what I expected at all.  I like the everything was packed.
     
  • I'm glad I purchased the Variax cable separately.  The little piece of...  well nevermind.  I'm glad I bought a decent cable.

 

Now for the fun.... not..

 

  1. So I plugged it in....   Right off the bat, the 5-Way switch is flakey as all get out.  I tried spraying some tuner cleaner from the front, and although there was some improvement...  I ended up opening up the back.   After I got that working, I starting going through the models and noticed the rotary switches were not engaging all the tones either... so with the back off I sprayed tuner cleaner in any switch and worked them well.   That "seemed" to clear things up... we'll see.
     
  2. So I got to playing, and noticed it needed a serious setup.  No neck relief, bridge too high, etc..  Not sure what the deal is there.  Easy enough to fix, but for $1000+ I kinda expect playable out of the box even if not "my" setup.
     
  3. So I installed necessary software and checked out the interface and decided to get the latest firmware update.  Ran Monkey and it sees the Variax, asks to update, do I wanna keep patches... (tried both yes and no options)  and after a few moments it fails asking to check that I didn't disconnect anything.  I thought it might be because I was going through the Helix, but when I just used the USB interface, it recognizes the interface but not the Variax.  So that's where that sits.   I just like to keep things up to date, and that's not working at the moment.

 

Bottom Line

 

I like the guitar.   After waiting many months for the funds to happen, I'm a little disappointed that I have to fuss with it to make it work.  Also while the guitar itself feels solid, the Variax controls and 5-way seem... well... cheap.   Looking at the parts, they look proprietary, but they sure don't look like they are designed for heavy duty use.   It looks like if I have to, I can replace the 5-way, but the other switches don't look like anything I'd be able to upgrade.  I'm sure they'll be fine, just expected a little more "precision."   If this was a $3000- 4000 guitar, I'd be downright pissed.  

 

Well that's all I have for now.   I'm excited to have it. Can't wait to create my first custom guitar which will be to imitate my BC Rich Bich 10 string.  I wish I didn't have to break out the toolkit on a new guitar to make it playable.

 

If anyone has any thoughts on updating the firmware...  I'd appreciate the input.

 

 

 

 

 

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Figured out the update, just needed to plug in a 1/4" jack. 

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[*]So I got to playing, and noticed it needed a serious setup. No neck relief, bridge too high, etc.. Not sure what the deal is there. Easy enough to fix, but for $1000+ I kinda expect playable out of the box even if not "my" setup.

While there's no excuse for faulty switches on brand new instrument (Yay quality control!), I learned not to expect playable out of the box a long time ago... from anything, no matter how much you've paid for it, or who's selling it to you. But especially not from an instrument you're buying sight unseen via the internet. Who knows how many planes, trains, and automobiles it's been on, (under no doubt delightful environmental conditions) to get to your front porch? Even guitars you buy in a retail outlet are rarely if ever in playing condition on day one... they've either been hanging on the wall for some indeterminate period of time being poked at by children in between periods of collecting dust, or they're rotting in the stock room in a box. My buddy's wife surprised him with an Ernie Ball EVH signature model for Xmas...the "US Platinum" version, a $3K guitar. The neck had so much back-bow, it looked like Captain Hook's prosthesis.

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While there's no excuse for faulty switches on brand new instrument (Yay quality control!), I learned not to expect playable out of the box a long time ago... from anything, no matter how much you've paid for it, or who's selling it to you. But especially not from an instrument you're buying sight unseen via the internet. Who knows how many planes, trains, and automobiles it's been on, (under no doubt delightful environmental conditions) to get to your front porch? Even guitars you buy in a retail outlet are rarely if ever in playing condition on day one... they've either been hanging on the wall for some indeterminate period of time being poked at by children in between periods of collecting dust, or they're rotting in the stock room in a box. My buddy's wife surprised him with an Ernie Ball EVH signature model for Xmas...the "US Platinum" version, a $3K guitar. The neck had so much back-bow, it looked like Captain Hook's prosthesis.

 

Yeah, I guess my expectations are high.  I've only purchased 3 other "new" guitars in the past 15 years and two were custom shop guitars so they came out of their cases playing themselves... I just needed to grab on and go for the ride.  The most recent was a an Ovation Adamas, they are gone over by several people at the factory before they leave.  

 

Never really thought about it, but another vote for "used" guitars is if they were indeed "used" by someone, than they are probably at least playable.  At least that's been my experience.  I rarely get a used guitar that isn't playable.  May have other issues, usually that's why I'm buying it... but almost always playable.

 

In any case...  A plus for the JTV-89F, is that it's pretty easy to setup.   Ended about 3/8's turn on the Truss rod, and about 1.5 turns down on the bridge height screws and no buzz or dead notes and nice action up and down the neck.  

 

The verdict on the 5-position is still out as I still had to mess with it today, blew more cleaner into it and cleared up...   We'll see if that lasts..   It doesn't feel mechanically faulty..  I may just take it off and soak it in cleaner and blow it out real well.     That's probably what it really needs :(

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So I spent a bit of time with Mr. 5-Position Switch...   Not sure if it was that nearly ALL of the blade solder points were cold, or that neither pickup ground was actually in the circuit board (just buried in solder, or that at least 1/2 the pickup leads were cold joints as well... or.... the switch has a mechanical issue...   

 

Actually I'm thinking less mechanical and more still cleaning the gunk out... but I re-soldered or more correctly ACTUALLY SOLDERED (not just applied lump of solder to wire) and things seem to be perking up.  

 

What got me here was I was playing with Workbench and noticed it was only intermittently switching into the #2 positions selection, mostly it would switch and the new model with flash on the screen for a second, and then it would return to whatever was in the #1 position.

 

So I decided I was going to give the switch a real good cleaning by taking it out, making sure all joints were proper, etc..

 

As soon as I moved the switch, the ground lead from the neck pickup fell off.  Turns out just the tip was touching solder so any movement and that's all she wrote.  I also notices most all of the pins from the blade into the board were loose... I actually only noted a few and that was good enough to break our the soldering iron.  As I hit each joint, the solder collapsed and surrounded the pin like they should.  I'm pretty sure they were all cold joints.   I checked the two connectors on the backside of the board, the leads on one were loose in the solder.

 

So essentially... I touched up all points.  The leads from the neck pickup had to be pulled, completely finished again and put back in.  

 

I'm guessing this guitar just slipped right by QC...  I'm glad I have the skills and tools, but not happy I had to use them.   If the switch has any further issues I'll just replace it, but it may be fine now.   We'll see.

 

Talk about mixed emotions.

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As soon as I moved the switch, the ground lead from the neck pickup fell off.  Turns out just the tip was touching solder so any movement and that's all she wrote.  I also notices most all of the pins from the blade into the board were loose... I actually only noted a few and that was good enough to break our the soldering iron.  As I hit each joint, the solder collapsed and surrounded the pin like they should.  I'm pretty sure they were all cold joints.   I checked the two connectors on the backside of the board, the leads on one were loose in the solder.

 

Well now part 2 and hopefully the last part....

 

I should have done this when the switch started having issues.  I removed it, removed all the pickup leads, most were just stuck into the solder.  I opened up the switch and well, it's a pretty cheap part.   There was a "glaze" (not lubricant) on the contacts and the way it mounts to the circuit board, any pressure on the switch can cause one or more of the pins to break their solder connection.   Also the two connectors from the Volume and Tone controls, they are just an accident looking for a place to happen.

 

Bottom line..

1.  Cleaned switch contacts and pulled up on tabs to add a little more pressure. reassembled.

2.  Re-soldered all pickup leads to board, each one goes through board now and soldered properly.

3.  Removed the "connectors" for the Volume and Tone pot, cut and trimmed leads and soldered directly to board

4.  Put assembly back into guitar and re-heated/set each of the pole tabs where the switch connects to the board.

 

Result... no more dropouts, no more noise, and I swear it overall sounds better.

 

I can't believe they used crimp connectors (and not very good ones) going from the Volume and Tone pots to the board.  I can't figure out why they would even do that because as far as I can tell, they were permanent connectors, so it's not like they were making it modular.  

 

Just got done playing random stuff switching between pickups and modelling etc etc.. without issue... finally.

 

And yes.. I likely blew the warranty, but no way was I going to send it back for who-knows-how-long just for them to do what I initially did (cleaned the switch) just to have returned it and have it fail.   This way, I know it's solid and I can trust it.

 

Sheeesh....  

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Well now part 2 and hopefully the last part....

 

I should have done this when the switch started having issues. I removed it, removed all the pickup leads, most were just stuck into the solder. I opened up the switch and well, it's a pretty cheap part. There was a "glaze" (not lubricant) on the contacts and the way it mounts to the circuit board, any pressure on the switch can cause one or more of the pins to break their solder connection. Also the two connectors from the Volume and Tone controls, they are just an accident looking for a place to happen.

 

Bottom line..

1. Cleaned switch contacts and pulled up on tabs to add a little more pressure. reassembled.

2. Re-soldered all pickup leads to board, each one goes through board now and soldered properly.

3. Removed the "connectors" for the Volume and Tone pot, cut and trimmed leads and soldered directly to board

4. Put assembly back into guitar and re-heated/set each of the pole tabs where the switch connects to the board.

 

Result... no more dropouts, no more noise, and I swear it overall sounds better.

 

I can't believe they used crimp connectors (and not very good ones) going from the Volume and Tone pots to the board. I can't figure out why they would even do that because as far as I can tell, they were permanent connectors, so it's not like they were making it modular.

 

Just got done playing random stuff switching between pickups and modelling etc etc.. without issue... finally.

 

And yes.. I likely blew the warranty, but no way was I going to send it back for who-knows-how-long just for them to do what I initially did (cleaned the switch) just to have returned it and have it fail. This way, I know it's solid and I can trust it.

 

Sheeesh....

$1000...unreal... and you were upset about the set-up, lol ;)

 

It's things like this that drive me to Warmoth to build my own guitars...been wanting a Tele lately. For the same, if not less money, I'll get something that's almost guaranteed to be prettier than anything Fender will sell me (unless one is willing to pay exorbitant prices and go the "Custom Shop" route), and I won't have to wonder if the guy who assembled it was asleep at the wheel. I couldn't care less what it says (or doesn't say) on the headstock...I want a functional instrument, and to know that my money wasn't spent on something that I then have to pull apart and fix. If I'm doing the work anyway, might as well do it from the get-go.

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.......

 

And yes.. I likely blew the warranty, but no way was I going to send it back for who-knows-how-long just for them to do what I initially did (cleaned the switch) just to have returned it and have it fail.   This way, I know it's solid and I can trust it.

 

Sheeesh....

 

Of course, what you experienced shouldn't happen. It's fortunate that you have the skill and knowledge to fix things yourself.

 

I think you should open a support ticket and point them to this thread. Not because it will necessarily help you but it may help Line 6 identify and correct some production issues so that future purchasers may not have to experience what you did. And who knows - you may even get an extended warranty out of it in case something else goes wrong.

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For the same, if not less money, I'll get something that's almost guaranteed to be prettier than anything Fender will sell me (unless one is willing to pay exorbitant prices and go the "Custom Shop" route)

 

From what I've seen, total cost of ownership on Warmoth-casters spikes when resale time comes.  At that point, the brand matters a lot more.  I know a lot of folks say "but I'll never sell this" but eBay and Reverb might say otherwise.

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From what I've seen, total cost of ownership on Warmoth-casters spikes when resale time comes.  At that point, the brand matters a lot more.  I know a lot of folks say "but I'll never sell this" but eBay and Reverb might say otherwise.

 

Been buying a selling used guitars for years.  I think brand only matters if you are buying NEW, and then, all bets are off for the future as the market it fickle.  On a used guitar, you can usually sell it for what you paid for it.    There are not many things you buy, use for a few years, even make money with it, and then sell it for the same as you paid.  Most any decent guitar, regardless of what's on the headstock will enable you to do that.

 

Now if we're talking "investment" that's a whole nother topic, that frankly makes no sense to me.   Why anyone would pay $1000's of dollars for a "brand name" even a custom shop model, when they can get a guitar build on spec by a luthier for likely less, that is in every way better than what could possibly come out of any "brand" custom shop.   

 

I am so grateful that Leo Fender and Les Paul or in the bigger sense Fender and Gibson did what they did oh so many years ago...  but I wouldn't own either unless it was one heckuva deal that I could flip quickly.

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From what I've seen, total cost of ownership on Warmoth-casters spikes when resale time comes.  At that point, the brand matters a lot more.  I know a lot of folks say "but I'll never sell this" but eBay and Reverb might say otherwise.

 

 

Ahh...the "Harley Davidson vs. every other bike on the planet" argument....let me save you the suspense, I've got 2 Suzuki's.  ;)

 

The only thing I care less about than what's on the headstock, is re-sale value. We're not talking about a Stradivarius here...Like my rides, I don't buy instruments as investments. I buy them to use, and I'm certainly not going to spend more money on something that I don't genuinely want, merely because the rest of the world has swallowed the advertising hype and decided that it's "better". Nor because it might be worth a few extra bucks if and when I choose to sell it. The ones that I end up parting with, I get whatever I get...if I make some money back, great. If not, oh well...

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Now if we're talking "investment" that's a whole nother topic, that frankly makes no sense to me.   Why anyone would pay $1000's of dollars for a "brand name" even a custom shop model, when they can get a guitar build on spec by a luthier for likely less, that is in every way better than what could possibly come out of any "brand" custom shop.   

 

 

 

Not to mention the fact that there's barely anything "custom" about "Custom Shop" guitars anyway. A few extra colors to choose from, perhaps different pickup options, but that's about it. And the funniest part of it all is that there are already 10,000 other "custom" guitars out there just like the one you ordered....a Strat is a Strat, except for the ones they manage to con you into paying an extra grand for because it's "special".

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The only thing I care less about than what's on the headstock, is re-sale value. We're not talking about a Stradivarius here...Like my rides, I don't buy instruments as investments. I buy them to use, and I'm certainly not going to spend more money on something that I don't genuinely want, merely because the rest of the world has swallowed the advertising hype and decided that it's "better". Nor because it might be worth a few extra bucks if and when I choose to sell it. The ones that I end up parting with, I get whatever I get...if I make some money back, great. If not, oh well...

 

 

Good to hear.  I'm pretty tired of the poor guys who wonder why the partscaster they paid $1200 sells for a couple hundred less than a used Strat that originally cost about the same as their no-name.

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I'm pretty tired of the poor guys who wonder why the partscaster they paid $1200 sells for a couple hundred less than a used Strat that originally cost about the same as their no-name.

I'm sure it's exhausting.

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I'm sure it's exhausting.

not nearly as tiresome as snarky people who think I'm advocating for purchasing brand name stuff as opposed to reminding them about the longer term implications of going generic.

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not nearly as tiresome as snarky people who think I'm advocating for purchasing brand name stuff as opposed to reminding them about the longer term implications of going generic.

A lousy diet, no exercise, and too much booze and cigarettes have long term implications. Guitars don't have any implications at all...they're just things.

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Back to the original topic. Perhaps I have just been lucky in the fact that every single Variax I have purchased via Sweetwater has shown up very well setup and only needed minor adjustments (both the JTV89F and 59 were a little low on the action for my personal preference) this also includes a VAC700 which showed in perfect playability. Your experience with the 5 position switch alone would have me fairly upset. I would have leaned toward returning the guitar but can understand if (like in your case} being more hands on instead of waiting for a replacement. I can't say whether its Sweetwater's involvement and the way they prep their guitars prior to shipment (Just got and Epiphone Les Paul Custom from them that was brilliantly set up) has to do with it, but I highly suspect it dies. Sounds like you may have gotten a JTV that had been sitting around for awhile. I am in love with mine and I hope all of these issues are worked out to your satisfaction.

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Back to the original topic. Perhaps I have just been lucky in the fact that every single Variax I have purchased via Sweetwater has shown up very well setup and only needed minor adjustments (both the JTV89F and 59 were a little low on the action for my personal preference) this also includes a VAC700 which showed in perfect playability. Your experience with the 5 position switch alone would have me fairly upset. I would have leaned toward returning the guitar but can understand if (like in your case} being more hands on instead of waiting for a replacement. I can't say whether its Sweetwater's involvement and the way they prep their guitars prior to shipment (Just got and Epiphone Les Paul Custom from them that was brilliantly set up) has to do with it, but I highly suspect it dies. Sounds like you may have gotten a JTV that had been sitting around for awhile. I am in love with mine and I hope all of these issues are worked out to your satisfaction.

 

I wouldn't think the "store," any store, should be the one responsible for the guitar being playable, but the more I research the topic, the more I realize that at the very least not-setup is the norm.

 

The switch...  that can happen.    More annoyed at the design of the switch than anything else.  I get the "mass production" aspect, but putting crimp connectors to hold the Volume and Tone leads seems... well.. silly..   Maybe in a perfect world ok... but with everything else soldered onto that board, adding at least 6 points of failure not to mention signal loss and noise, doesn't seem prudent.   Since I soldered the connection, it feels kinda like a new guitar...   a new switch at least.  The has a positive feel and no drops or cut outs if you wiggle it or bump the guitar.

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Back to the original topic. Perhaps I have just been lucky in the fact that every single Variax I have purchased via Sweetwater has shown up very well setup and only needed minor adjustments (both the JTV89F and 59 were a little low on the action for my personal preference) this also includes a VAC700 which showed in perfect playability. Your experience with the 5 position switch alone would have me fairly upset. I would have leaned toward returning the guitar but can understand if (like in your case} being more hands on instead of waiting for a replacement. I can't say whether its Sweetwater's involvement and the way they prep their guitars prior to shipment (Just got and Epiphone Les Paul Custom from them that was brilliantly set up) has to do with it, but I highly suspect it dies. Sounds like you may have gotten a JTV that had been sitting around for awhile. I am in love with mine and I hope all of these issues are worked out to your satisfaction.

Part of the problem lies with the fact that one man's "brilliantly set-up" is another's "ridden hard and put away wet". Guitar players are crazy. We like things the way we like them, and everything else sucks.

 

Now I like dealing with Sweetwater... they're very pleasant, responsive if you have a problem, and will often work with you on prices, if possible. I've purchased two guitars from them over the last couple of years. Both were playable... were they exactly how I like everything, so that I didn't have to touch a thing? Hardly. But that doesn't mean it's anybody's fault. What they actually do (or don't do) before they ship is anyone's guess... but let's assume for the moment that someone actually is going over each instrument with a fine toothed comb. Even so, it's not as though there's some form to fill out asking how you like your set-up...so the guy doing it is just guessing where you like your action, neck relief, etc. And more likely than not, every guitar he's working on is getting the exact same treatment. If that happens to be your cup of tea, great...glowing reviews of his set-up skills shall flow like wine. If not, you'll be unhappy. Either way it's all guesswork.

 

Then factor in things like shipping conditions...buy a guitar in the middle of winter, and have it shipped to Fargo. After it spends a week in a half-dozen freezing trucks, any and all set-up work done beforehand will be 100% out the window.

 

Point is, given the staggering list of variables involved, if you're happy with a guitar's playability out of the box, that's wonderful, but it's mostly dumb luck...

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Part of the problem lies with the fact that one man's "brilliantly set-up" is another's "ridden hard and put away wet". Guitar players are crazy. We like things the way we like them, and everything else sucks.

 

Now I like dealing with Sweetwater... they're very pleasant, responsive if you have a problem, and will often work with you on prices, if possible. I've purchased two guitars from them over the last couple of years. Both were playable... were they exactly how I like everything, so that I didn't have to touch a thing? Hardly. But that doesn't mean it's anybody's fault. 

 

There is a far cry from, and I thought I was pretty clear... between "not setup for me" and not playable.  Interestingly... it was in tune...  which I thought odd.   Maybe the neck just hadn't settled yet and it pulled, but it was pretty flat.  

 

This is actually common when the guitar is assembled without letting the neck age.  The accounting folks HATE to see necks and bodies on racks for weeks not making money...  I know one company that would actually hide the racks (the racks were on wheels)  when the folks from corporate would come around.  "Why are those parts just sitting there??!!!!... that's inventory!!!  Get those assembled !!!" etc etc..  

 

Music123 gave me a great deal on a new guitar.  The firmware was only missing the latest update for the Shuriken, so it was fairly new.  Not sure when actually built.  Sweetwater is a great place too for customer service.  

 

The switch, well kinda reminds me of my Victory motorcycle.  Now Vic was made in the USA, all metal parts... turn signal stems, headlamp bucket, mirrors, fenders, all metal... except one part.  They call it a "cheese wedge" and it was actually a cover on the side of the engine with the logo.  Arguably the most seen and identifiable part on the bike with it's unique design element, and it was made of plastic.    The 5-position switch in this guitar reminds me of the cheese wedge.  I swear this is one of the best built guitars I have seen.  Certainly on par with Ibanez, Schecter and others.   I am a guitar seller's worst nightmare as I go over the guitar wearing a magnifier lamp like jewlers wear on their head.  It has NO flaws anywhere.    In fact the rest of the circuit and parts, even the actual circuit board used by the switch with the three resistors in the layers... top notch... really..   Then they threw on a less than top quality switch and used connectors in the first part of the signal path.    Just seems odd.   I'm guessing most people would never notice, and I guess that's the point.  Had mine not had an issue, I would not have noticed either.

 

And I guess it's a statement that even after the switch issue, and being surprised at lack of setup... I really really love this guitar.   It's very lightweight.   at least a lot lighter than anything else I have that's electric.  I love the neck and because of this guitar I'm going to sand the neck on my other main guitar.  I love the feel of the not-gloss neck.   And now that I have the switch fixed...  it's a pleasure to play.    

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There is a far cry from, and I thought I was pretty clear... between "not setup for me" and not playable. Interestingly... it was in tune... which I thought odd. Maybe the neck just hadn't settled yet and it pulled, but it was pretty flat.

 

This is actually common when the guitar is assembled without letting the neck age. The accounting folks HATE to see necks and bodies on racks for weeks not making money... I know one company that would actually hide the racks (the racks were on wheels) when the folks from corporate would come around. "Why are those parts just sitting there??!!!!... that's inventory!!! Get those assembled !!!" etc etc..

Yeah, it's awesome when the bean counters are in charge. Everything always turns out so well...

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Yeah, it's awesome when the bean counters are in charge. Everything always turns out so well...

 

Said no one ever !!!!!  LOL    well I guess you just did..  :)

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Said no one ever !!!!! LOL well I guess you just did.. :)

One of my old man's many pearls of wisdom was this: "Everyone rises to the level of their own incompetence"...the theory being that if you're genuinely good at something, you'll probably be stuck doing that thing forever, because your skill is making someone middle management drone look good, and if they let you rise to the next rung on the ladder, that person might actually have to start begging productive on their own. On the other hand, if you're just inept enough to be dangerous (but not quite lethal), you'll be repeatedly promoted so that your current boss can be rid of your stupidity. This is how CEO's are born...;)

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One of my old man's many pearls of wisdom was this: "Everyone rises to the level of their own incompetence"...the theory being that if you're genuinely good at something, you'll probably be stuck doing that thing forever, because your skill is making someone middle management drone look good, and if they let you rise to the next rung on the ladder, that person might actually have to start begging productive on their own. On the other hand, if you're just inept enough to be dangerous (but not quite lethal), you'll be repeatedly promoted so that your current boss can be rid of your stupidity. This is how CEO's are born... ;)

 

That's a corollary on The Peter Principal.

 

"In an organizational structure, assessing an employee's potential for a promotion is often based on their performance in the current job. This eventually results in their being promoted to their highest level of competence and potentially then to a role in which they are not competent, referred to as their "level of incompetence". The employee has no chance of further promotion, thus reaching their career's ceiling in an organization."

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One of my old man's many pearls of wisdom was this: "Everyone rises to the level of their own incompetence"...the theory being that if you're genuinely good at something, you'll probably be stuck doing that thing forever, because your skill is making someone middle management drone look good, and if they let you rise to the next rung on the ladder, that person might actually have to start begging productive on their own. On the other hand, if you're just inept enough to be dangerous (but not quite lethal), you'll be repeatedly promoted so that your current boss can be rid of your stupidity. This is how CEO's are born... ;)

Saw this effect directly while working for the Department of the Army as a civilian.  Usually if a manager was pretty incompentent basically the only way to solve the problem was to promote them out of the position and get them out of the way.  Sad but true.

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Completely off topic... but in my field when I was in the Navy we used to envy our counterparts in the Air Force.   In the Navy we'd start as operators, then once good at that become techs, then once almost good at that became analysts, get that just about figured out and become senior analyst, and then supervisors essentially never seeing what you were trained for again.

 

The AirForce...  If you came in as an operator... 20 years later... best damn operator there was.  Came in as analyst... 20 years later... best damn analyst there ever was...  

 

The Airforce folks envied the fact that we got to grow and change, we envied them because they got to excel in their field.   

 

By the way... I heard from the Support Ticket I created.   Nothing to report really.  Basically told me I shouldn't have fixed it myself cause of warranty, but thanks for letting them know about the issue.   What I expected.

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Basically told me I shouldn't have fixed it myself cause of warranty, but thanks for letting them know about the issue. What I expected.

Lol... you really should be ashamed of yourself. ;)

 

And you know what'll come of it? Nothing. It'll be filed under "Gee, that's the first time we've heard about this problem"...

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Lol.. If they are using any 1/2 decent call tracking software (and it seems they are) it's recorded weather they like it or not. :)

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