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helix sound test


Dazzer40
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Just got myself Helix LT  very happy with it but I have noticed and the same goes for the hd500-  I like the sound better using headphones , I can't say the sound is bad using my studio monitors because its not its just to me  it sounds better with my headphones . I have tried to understand why !  is it because they are closer to my ears and I can hear more  detail in the sounds , Is it because the volume is much lower , ? again I don't know but if I could replicate that sound on to my studio monitors I would be very happy . SO I was wondering if anyone else feels this way and had better success with studio monitor setups ?

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It's different. You are probably turning the monitors to a reasonable volume, and more volume means more presence.

How will you be using your Helix? If for recording, imho, headphones is actually not horrible. Studio monitors is better.

 

If live, you should tweak your patches at gig volume through something as close to the PA you'll be using as possible. FRFR is good for this.

 

Are you making your own patches or just using stuff built-in and found on the web. IF the latter, I URGE you to try making your own.

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A lot really depends on the headphones and the studio monitors.  If you have smaller studio monitors that may sometimes be the difference.  Placement of the studio monitors an also be a factor.  Make sure you follow the guidelines that are published in your manual for placement.

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There are 2 factors - one is the sound source and the other is the volume.

Google fletcher munson curve.  This fact that perceived frequency response varies with volume might be part of what you are hearing.

The other part is that guitar amps do not produce very low or high frequencies - this is a really good thing for guitar tone, and very important for distortion.  What sounds like "creamy" distortion as reproduced by a guitar amp sounds like a harsh buzzing when run through a full range speaker system.

You might also find the different reproduction systems and that volume curve are what is giving you a harsher sound through your monitors.

Most people here find they cut everything below 100Hz and above maybe 5500Hz to get back that creamy quality.  It also makes clean and apparently very hifi tones sound rounder and nicer.

Maybe this will help?

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There are 2 factors - one is the sound source and the other is the volume.

Google fletcher munson curve.  This fact that perceived frequency response varies with volume might be part of what you are hearing.

The other part is that guitar amps do not produce very low or high frequencies - this is a really good thing for guitar tone, and very important for distortion.  What sounds like "creamy" distortion as reproduced by a guitar amp sounds like a harsh buzzing when run through a full range speaker system.

You might also find the different reproduction systems and that volume curve are what is giving you a harsher sound through your monitors.

Most people here find they cut everything below 100Hz and above maybe 5500Hz to get back that creamy quality.  It also makes clean and apparently very hifi tones sound rounder and nicer.

Maybe this will help?

 

a lot of what your saying makes sense I will be trying a few things out in order to get a better sound , at the moment   I use my helix at home so I don't need it too loud , other than making my own basic patches I am some what a novice at this tech  and I haven't a clue what you mean by cut  100hz /  5500HZ ?  

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Then take the easy approach for now - go to global EQ and you will see there is a low cut and a high cut that you can enable - you will see that the values can be adjusted for frequency and cut in dB.  What I'm suggesting is you adjust the frequency of the low cut to 100Hz (that's hertz the way you measure frequency - if you see A440 on a tuner - 440Hz is the frequency of A). then you cut it 24dB - it's the other adjustment you can make.  Then you adjust the high cut to 5K or a bit more and again cut it by say -24dB.

You will then have a graph for your global EQ that looks like a flat top hill.  That's a good place to start.  You might find that a little lift somewhere on one of the other ranges - maybe 2K (2K=2000Hz) - gives you nice presence - have a bit of an experiment.

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