Jump to content
steelstringer

3 amp blend?

Recommended Posts

I have really been enjoying the tones that I am getting when blending 2 different amp models together. Is there a way to blend 3, or am I getting too greedy now? What would the routing look like if this is possible? Btw, my setup is using all Helix amp models/effects direct to my mixer. Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes it is, just split your signal through 2 amp from input a, and even 2 other amp on input b. You can route your signal any way you want on Helix, but you will run out of DSP power fast with 3 4 amp. Also, your sound is really shape by your cab Sim, and it take a lot of DSP. So you are better keeping some DSP for impulse or cab block. Try to build two paralle single cab block per amp with a little room reverb, almost nothing , for one cab. It can be twice the same cab with different mic. I think you will achieve a way bigger sound with more cab block than amp block.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the feedback, Gritch. My goal is to blend two different overdriven amps and one clean/chorus-y amp. Right now, my two favorite patches are a Park/interstate zed blend and a Park/Roland blend, so I am trying to get the best of both worlds. It's pretty awesome that the Helix provides these possibilities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Question: If I use this kind of approach, then I choose a guitar input for both paths 1 and 2. I have read on this board that this often causes an unprocessed , dry guitar signal that negatively affects the tone of the patch. Is this true?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Question: If I use this kind of approach, then I choose a guitar input for both paths 1 and 2. I have read on this board that this often causes an unprocessed , dry guitar signal that negatively affects the tone of the patch. Is this true?

 

That's only true if you actually create a path for unprocessed guitar to get through.  Then it will get through.  But there are no "bugs" in this regard, no.  Those users just weren't paying close attention.  It's really important to analyze your signal path so you understand what is going where.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's only true if you actually create a path for unprocessed guitar to get through. Then it will get through. But there are no "bugs" in this regard, no. Those users just weren't paying close attention. It's really important to analyze your signal path so you understand what is going where.

That makes sense. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have done a few similar patches. Obviously DSP is the main thing. I have one I am very fond of where I run two paths with regular amps and effects, then a third path for a clean overtone. I do not put any amp on that path, just a IR or cabinet some Reverb and delay.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've done it. Get past 2 amps and it all became mush for me.

agreed! even 2 amps fully wet gets kinda lost... my BEST experience has been wet/dry... one amp path clean and wet with effects, and a second path set barely dirty/ edge of breakup, and dry

 

it creates a great stereo effect

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

agreed! even 2 amps fully wet gets kinda lost... my BEST experience has been wet/dry... one amp path clean and wet with effects, and a second path set barely dirty/ edge of breakup, and dry

 

it creates a great stereo effect

Cool idea. I'll give it a shot later tonight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have spent some time lately creating patches with varying amp blends, and the advice on this thread was super helpful. Thanks for the input. The sad reality, however, hit me when I compared these very "busy" presets to some of my older, simplistic ones with one amp and 2 irs. The simpler presets sat better in the mix (live mix, I mean).

 

The amp blends sound awesome, but they're a little cluttered sounding to me. They aren't as crisp and defined as one nicely dialed in amp. Of course, my ears might say otherwise the next time I turn on the Helix (that happens to me frequently).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have spent some time lately creating patches with varying amp blends, and the advice on this thread was super helpful. Thanks for the input. The sad reality, however, hit me when I compared these very "busy" presets to some of my older, simplistic ones with one amp and 2 irs. The simpler presets sat better in the mix (live mix, I mean).

 

The amp blends sound awesome, but they're a little cluttered sounding to me. They aren't as crisp and defined as one nicely dialed in amp. Of course, my ears might say otherwise the next time I turn on the Helix (that happens to me frequently).

Yes, there is a HUGE difference in building presets that sound fantastic when playing solo at home, and one that will sit in a mix with a band. I think most forum members that are integrating multiple modeling systems or VSTs, and filling up their presets with dozens of effects are trying to achieve solo home tones. Sometimes they can be utilized in a recording, but usually when there isn't much else going on in the other tracks. Don't get me wrong, I do the same thing at home just experimenting with the capabilities/concepts, but my live in the mix presets are much different for me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...