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cboshdave

Leveling out volumes between patches...

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I am enjoying getting to know my hd500x.  I am looking for suggestions on how to level out the various patches though.  I get one set and try to switch quickly from one to another but one is REALLY loud and another is soft.  What is the best way to control the levels?  

 

I know the immediate answer is volume.  But to clarify, the volume ranges are just different.  I am just guessing here, but do I need to go to the Mixer section and change the decibel setting to make it right (level with the others)?  

 

One more question about levels.  if I have a "lead" in the song, what is the best way to boost the volume range with a toggle switch?  i realize the foot volume is a good answer here.  But are there other "tricks"?  I am looking for interesting/different options.

 

I have also noticed that some people label their toggle switches.  is this because they try to put similar functions on the switch between patches?  i.e. Reverb on/off, distortion on/off.  

 

I know there are probably a hundred answers to these questions.  Just looking for some thoughts.  Thanks!!

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I am enjoying getting to know my hd500x. I am looking for suggestions on how to level out the various patches though. I get one set and try to switch quickly from one to another but one is REALLY loud and another is soft. What is the best way to control the levels?

 

I know the immediate answer is volume. But to clarify, the volume ranges are just different. I am just guessing here, but do I need to go to the Mixer section and change the decibel setting to make it right...

There's really no mystery to leveling patch volumes. If A is louder than B, then turn A down, or B up...or vice versa, whatever floats your boat. The individual channel volumes or the mixer block (or both) can be used. And yes, some amp models are inherently louder than others...somewhat annoying, but it is what it is.

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Put the POD into A,B,C,D mode. Level and Mixer volumes are programmable. Once you get the sounds you like, start adjusting those and saving while you tap the different presets using a FBV foot switch. You can assign one foot switch to turn on a Studio/EQ block that just boosts level. That can be used for leads. Well, there's one way I do it. Yes, there are a hundred+ other ways across these forums...

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The question of normalizing volumes between presets comes up often.

 

First, go through the loud presets, look at what FX are programmed... and their settings. If you're new to this, it will help you learn what each effect does and how the various parameters affect the overall sound. There's a learning curve, but it's worth it. For example, loud presets will likely have high gain amp models with the drive and volumes turned up, and heavy distortion FX, etc. Softer presets will have "tamer" amps, lower drive settings, and milder FX with parameters turned down.

 

Everyone has their own approach to this. Here are some suggestions:

 

1. Group loud presets together; that way you'll avoid nerve-jangling surprises.

2. Do the same for soft presets.

3. If you find some presets are too loud, adjust amp settings or change amps, modify FX parameters or switch FX, etc.

4. If you find some presets are too soft, reverse the process used in #3.

5. Once you've got the presets within a roughly comparable volume range, you can then "fine-adjust" the on-board drive and volume level knobs for each preset and save the settings.

6. You can also use a second expression pedal dedicated to volume (I use an EX-1) for even more control, and for blasting solos... BUT that requires putting a Volume/Pan link in the effects chain.

Note: I find the "either/or" scenario of combining volume & wah in one pedal is limiting.

 

Finally, you can set up a "gig system" on your board: for example, saving rhythm or ambient tones in A & C with your lead/solo tones in B & D. (That strategy is used in the Firehawk FX.) By switching from A to B you can go from rhythm to solo instantly. Of course, you'll still need the volume pedal to bring things up or down depending on the mix.

 

Hope this gives you a few ideas.

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There are some wild variances in volumes from amp to amp and from full amp models to Pre amp only models.

I have found that the Master in the DEP is linked to the amp and it's DEP. So turning amp volumes up and down

don't have the same effect of changing the tone as turning the master.

The mixer block is where you balance one to another saving each.

Download a free VU meter for your DAW and put the HD into it. http://www.tb-software.com/TBProAudio/mvmeter.html

This way you can start with any patch and just get the amp model showing a decent average in dbvu.

You then turn on FX and off to balance those and finally with all on or most depending on the purpose of the patch.

Also, if going in and out via HD 's USB turn off the listen or monitoring function as it will create a time shift phase issue.

All you are doing in the DAW is checking the peak levels and VU plugin to make it easier.

You can also open EDIT up and do the tweaking in there.

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