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Snapshots oder Stomp Mode - what's the difference

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Sorry, but I just don't get it:

As far as I understand the idea behind Screenshots, they are something like different states/charakters/variations of a certain preset.
What you do in stomp mode is more like adding/bypassing certain "ingredients" of a preset.

 

But at the end of they day both approaches control a) the on/off-state of one or more boxes b) parameters of one or more boxes?

 

 

So what's the main difference in practical usage?

 

Thanks!

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They really are fundamentally the same thing with snapshots simple being a bigger, implementation of what's always been available in stomp mode.  Essentially they each have the same DSP limitations of a single preset.

 

I've never felt a compelling need to use snapshots, but that's based on the way I use my Helix in live shows as compared to how others use it.

 

I prefer to tailor my patches to specific songs rather than use generic configurations for clean, crunchy, dirt, heavy....etc across different songs.  But that's also based on the fact that we cover a pretty wide range of material and genres and I use different guitars for different songs.  The pause between patches is irrelevant to me because one song has ended and I'm going to another, so there's dead space anyway.  In my case this keeps my patches very clean as I only assign buttons to things that need to change during that song which is typically very little and my patch name is descriptive of the song I'm playing.  For complex changes involving multiple effects or changes to settings I use multiple assignments that are still just a one button change.  Typically my patches have no more than 3 buttons and most often only one or two which is great for me as I prefer not to tap dance across a bunch of buttons while I'm playing.

 

This is different from many folks that stay closer to a single, or just a few genres.  In their case they might opt for patches that are genre specific but cover a wide range of differences in tone and are more comfortable with a single patch across a lot of songs.  Particularly if there are no guitar changes.

 

In short, the capabilities are no different between the two, but the practical application is more what determines what will work best for you.

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I think the main differentiator is that Stomp mode is changing the Bypass state of a pedal, whereas Snapshot mode actually recalls a State of a pedal (this is in simplest terms). For example, say you had one Stomp switch (in stomp mode) that turns on 2 effects and turns off another. Then, the next stomp switch, you wanted to turn on a different effect, and only turn off 1 of the effects from the previous state. You can't really do that, since you are only affecting bypass state. In snapshot mode, you can completely recall a snapshot of effect/paramaters states.

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A noteworthy difference between the two is that a Snapshot can control up to 64 functions while a Stomp footswitch maxes out at 8. 8 is fine if you're doing fairly simple changes, but if you are getting into manipulating multiple amp and pedal parameters then it goes pretty quick. Another is that while Stomps can only toggle between two values of a parameter, Snapshots have no such limitation and can move a given parameter to as many different values as there are Snapshots configured. I personally prefer Stomp mode for it's simplicity and flexibility, but there are certainly advantages to be had with Snapshots.

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I look at snap shot mode as the ability to have one pedalboard set up in 8 complete different states from simple on off of effects to completely altering the setting of each pedal

 

I appreciate the 1 scene per song and that exactly how I used to work but now I have the choice of say

 

fender plus pedals x 8 permutations on one press of a switch

or bass amp with the same

 

all good to be able to work how you want flexibly

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One way I've been using Snapshots is to have them basically be like switching channels on an amp.  Same pedalboard configuration, but different amp and maybe EQ settings.  It's like having an 8-channel amp.  But then I use Stomp mode to control individual stomp effects, just like a standard pedal board.

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Thanks for your answers. I guess it really depends on how one uses the Helix. For me a supposed knickknack is crucial:

After activating a Snapshot, Helix returns into preset mode (if I want to). That's handy for me and my way of using Helix.

 

 

 

I think the main differentiator is that Stomp mode is changing the Bypass state of a pedal, whereas Snapshot mode actually recalls a State of a pedal (this is in simplest terms). For example, say you had one Stomp switch (in stomp mode) that turns on 2 effects and turns off another. Then, the next stomp switch, you wanted to turn on a different effect, and only turn off 1 of the effects from the previous state. You can't really do that, since you are only affecting bypass state. In snapshot mode, you can completely recall a snapshot of effect/paramaters states.

 

 

As far as I get it, that's not really true. Footswitches in stomp mode can control NOT only the bypass-state of boxes but also different settings?!

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One footswitch in stomp mode can control the bypass state of up to 8 blocks simultaneously, and can also have up to 64 controller assignments.  So you can toggle between two very different settings of an amp, for example, with a footswitch while simultaneously toggling the state of an overdrive, reverb, etc.  Snapshots can set the bypass state of every block, but I think are still limited to 64 controller assignments.  But it's a 8-state system instead of the 2-state system you get with a single footswitch.

 

I'm not sure if you can assign to single block's bypass state to multiple footswitches, and if you can it would lead to weirdness.  The footswitch would toggle the current state, not necessarily turn the block "on" or "off".  So the history of what you stomp on would matter.  A snapshot, on the other hand, will put everything into a known state.

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One footswitch in stomp mode can control the bypass state of up to 8 blocks simultaneously, and can also have up to 64 controller assignments....

Are you certain on this? I'm under the impression that a Stomp switch is limited to 8 commands total. While I'm not at my Helix right now to verify before typing,  I'm pretty certain I have patches where a Stomp switch controls only parameters, no bypasses, and still maxed out at 8...

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I mis-spoke.  Each preset can have 64 controller assignments.  I'm not in front of my Helix, either.  It could be that a each footswitch has a limit of 8 "things" it can control, through some combination of bypass and parameters.

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Thanks for your answers. I guess it really depends on how one uses the Helix. For me a supposed knickknack is crucial:

After activating a Snapshot, Helix returns into preset mode (if I want to). That's handy for me and my way of using Helix.

 

 

 

As far as I get it, that's not really true. Footswitches in stomp mode can control NOT only the bypass-state of boxes but also different settings?!

 

Yes, your last statement is correct.  It's not just bypass or on/off states but also parameter manipulation as well.  Since it's a stomp all the things that were affected by the stomp will be returned to the initial state when the stomp is disengaged.

 

It really does boil down to how you use your Helix and that varies from person to person.  I think it's worth knowing both systems since if the only thing you know is a hammer everything starts to look like a nail.  It's nice to have the ability to use either.

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Thanks for your answers. I guess it really depends on how one uses the Helix. For me a supposed knickknack is crucial:

After activating a Snapshot, Helix returns into preset mode (if I want to). That's handy for me and my way of using Helix.

 

 

 

As far as I get it, that's not really true. Footswitches in stomp mode can control NOT only the bypass-state of boxes but also different settings?!

 

Yes, you're correct. I was trying to give the simplest example in what sets them apart

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Although there are no rules, there might be some useful conventions for preset, snapshot and stomp configurations.

 

Presets: useful when there are significant changes in the configuration needed for a particular genre, set, or song. Presets can use different blocks and block configurations. Basically you can change anything. But loading presets takes some time. You can have 4 to 8 presets selectable at a time without pressing the bank buttons. There is some delay in switching presets and no effect tails. So use them between songs or within songs that have distinct sections that don’t require fast switching.

 

Snapshots: useful when there are significant changes to many prameters of blocks in a preset for a particular guitar model, tuning, or section of a song. You can’t change the content or layout of the blocks, but you can change their parameters. There are 4 to 8 snapshots directly available from footswitches within a preset. Use the Mode button to get to snapshot mode. Snapshots change immediately and retain effect tails. So use them within a song for different sections that require immediate changes.

 

Stomp: useful when there are a limited number of block states or min/max values that need to be change, usually to control effects within a snapshot or patch. You can have 4, 8 or 10 stomp switches at a time. Changes are immediate and tails are retained. Use them to control effects or tones like amp channel switching within a song section.

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Thanks again! Much clearer to me now. 

 

Wouldn't it be great to be able to switch between Snapshots (let's say 1 and 2) by pressing on the active preset footswitch again?

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What are snapshots?

Imagine you have eight pet octopuses, all slithering around your amp and pedalboard. Instead of tap-dancing on your pedals (and accidentally stepping on a tentacle), you shout "Okay, gang—here's the verse... now!" and your octopuses turn some pedals on, turn other pedals off, and tweak all your amps and pedals' knobs to make the best possible settings for your song's verse, all seamlessly with spillover delay and reverb trails. Then you shout "Ready for the chorus... now!" and your octopuses instantly tweak everything for your song's chorus. The only thing your octopuses can't do is rearrange your pedalboard or swap out an effect or amp for a different one.

pI6R1Zu.jpg

Each preset can have up to 64 parameters assigned to Snapshots; hence, eight octopuses with eight tentacles each. The octopuses can remember eight separate groups of on/off statuses and setting tweaks per preset (say, for your verse, chorus, solo, overindulgent noise segue, etc.); that is, Helix has eight snapshots per preset. Each of the eight snapshots in Helix stores and recalls the state of certain elements in the current preset, including:

  • Effect Bypass—The bypass (on/off) state of all processing blocks (except Loopers)
  • Parameter Control—The values of any parameters assigned to controllers (up to 64 per preset) To make a parameter Snapshot-controllable, PRESS AND TURN the parameter's knob. The value will appear white and in brackets. To remove Snapshot control, hold BYPASS and press the parameter's knob. The brackets will disappear.
  • Command Center—The values of any instant commands and the on/off states of any toggle commands assigned to switches (such as Amp Control messages)
  • Tempo—The current system tempo, if "Global Settings > MIDI/Tempo" > Tempo Select is set to "Per Snapshot." (By default, it's set to "Per Preset.")

Depending on how you set them up, snapshots can act as eight variations of the same tone, eight drastically different tones, or any combination thereof—all within the same preset. In many cases, a single preset's snapshots may accommodate all the various tones required for a song.

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1 hour ago, Digital_Igloo said:

What are snapshots?

Imagine you have eight pet octopuses, all slithering around your amp and pedalboard. Instead of tap-dancing on your pedals (and accidentally stepping on a tentacle), you shout "Okay, gang—here's the verse... now!" and your octopuses turn some pedals on, turn other pedals off, and tweak all your amps and pedals' knobs to make the best possible settings for your song's verse, all seamlessly with spillover delay and reverb trails. Then you shout "Ready for the chorus... now!" and your octopuses instantly tweak everything for your song's chorus. The only thing your octopuses can't do is rearrange your pedalboard or swap out an effect or amp for a different one.

pI6R1Zu.jpg

Each preset can have up to 64 parameters assigned to Snapshots; hence, eight octopuses with eight tentacles each. The octopuses can remember eight separate groups of on/off statuses and setting tweaks per preset (say, for your verse, chorus, solo, overindulgent noise segue, etc.); that is, Helix has eight snapshots per preset. Each of the eight snapshots in Helix stores and recalls the state of certain elements in the current preset, including:

  • Effect Bypass—The bypass (on/off) state of all processing blocks (except Loopers)
  • Parameter Control—The values of any parameters assigned to controllers (up to 64 per preset) To make a parameter Snapshot-controllable, PRESS AND TURN the parameter's knob. The value will appear white and in brackets. To remove Snapshot control, hold BYPASS and press the parameter's knob. The brackets will disappear.
  • Command Center—The values of any instant commands and the on/off states of any toggle commands assigned to switches (such as Amp Control messages)
  • Tempo—The current system tempo, if "Global Settings > MIDI/Tempo" > Tempo Select is set to "Per Snapshot." (By default, it's set to "Per Preset.")

Depending on how you set them up, snapshots can act as eight variations of the same tone, eight drastically different tones, or any combination thereof—all within the same preset. In many cases, a single preset's snapshots may accommodate all the various tones required for a song.

giphy.gif

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5 hours ago, Digital_Igloo said:

What are snapshots?

Imagine you have eight pet octopuses, all slithering around your amp and pedalboard. Instead of tap-dancing on your pedals (and accidentally stepping on a tentacle), you shout "Okay, gang—here's the verse... now!" and your octopuses turn some pedals on, turn other pedals off, and tweak all your amps and pedals' knobs to make the best possible settings for your song's verse, all seamlessly with spillover delay and reverb trails. Then you shout "Ready for the chorus... now!" and your octopuses instantly tweak everything for your song's chorus. The only thing your octopuses can't do is rearrange your pedalboard or swap out an effect or amp for a different one.

pI6R1Zu.jpg

Each preset can have up to 64 parameters assigned to Snapshots; hence, eight octopuses with eight tentacles each. The octopuses can remember eight separate groups of on/off statuses and setting tweaks per preset (say, for your verse, chorus, solo, overindulgent noise segue, etc.); that is, Helix has eight snapshots per preset. Each of the eight snapshots in Helix stores and recalls the state of certain elements in the current preset, including:

  • Effect Bypass—The bypass (on/off) state of all processing blocks (except Loopers)
  • Parameter Control—The values of any parameters assigned to controllers (up to 64 per preset) To make a parameter Snapshot-controllable, PRESS AND TURN the parameter's knob. The value will appear white and in brackets. To remove Snapshot control, hold BYPASS and press the parameter's knob. The brackets will disappear.
  • Command Center—The values of any instant commands and the on/off states of any toggle commands assigned to switches (such as Amp Control messages)
  • Tempo—The current system tempo, if "Global Settings > MIDI/Tempo" > Tempo Select is set to "Per Snapshot." (By default, it's set to "Per Preset.")

Depending on how you set them up, snapshots can act as eight variations of the same tone, eight drastically different tones, or any combination thereof—all within the same preset. In many cases, a single preset's snapshots may accommodate all the various tones required for a song.

This has got to be included in the next Helix User Guide!

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19 hours ago, Digital_Igloo said:

What are snapshots?

Imagine you have eight pet octopuses, all slithering around your amp and pedalboard. Instead of tap-dancing on your pedals (and accidentally stepping on a tentacle), you shout "Okay, gang—here's the verse... now!" and your octopuses turn some pedals on, turn other pedals off, and tweak all your amps and pedals' knobs to make the best possible settings for your song's verse, all seamlessly with spillover delay and reverb trails. Then you shout "Ready for the chorus... now!" and your octopuses instantly tweak everything for your song's chorus. The only thing your octopuses can't do is rearrange your pedalboard or swap out an effect or amp for a different one.

pI6R1Zu.jpg

Each preset can have up to 64 parameters assigned to Snapshots; hence, eight octopuses with eight tentacles each. The octopuses can remember eight separate groups of on/off statuses and setting tweaks per preset (say, for your verse, chorus, solo, overindulgent noise segue, etc.); that is, Helix has eight snapshots per preset. Each of the eight snapshots in Helix stores and recalls the state of certain elements in the current preset, including:

  • Effect Bypass—The bypass (on/off) state of all processing blocks (except Loopers)
  • Parameter Control—The values of any parameters assigned to controllers (up to 64 per preset) To make a parameter Snapshot-controllable, PRESS AND TURN the parameter's knob. The value will appear white and in brackets. To remove Snapshot control, hold BYPASS and press the parameter's knob. The brackets will disappear.
  • Command Center—The values of any instant commands and the on/off states of any toggle commands assigned to switches (such as Amp Control messages)
  • Tempo—The current system tempo, if "Global Settings > MIDI/Tempo" > Tempo Select is set to "Per Snapshot." (By default, it's set to "Per Preset.")

Depending on how you set them up, snapshots can act as eight variations of the same tone, eight drastically different tones, or any combination thereof—all within the same preset. In many cases, a single preset's snapshots may accommodate all the various tones required for a song.

I will add that (and not to disagree with the expert here), that if you set up your preset with enough DSP space, you CAN simulate switching amps and/or effects.  I have several presets where I use a "Fender-ish" amp on my clean snapshots and a Marshall or Litigator or Boogie amp for the dirty snapshots.  I even have one that uses a Tweed Bassman for Snapshot 1 and 2 ( clean and crunch) and switches to a Dual Amp set up using a Mesa MkIV and Plexi in stereo for Snapshots 3 and 4 (overdrive and lead on Snapshots 3 and 4).   

It requires using two of something (amps, pedals, etc) and having one just plain "OFF" on the snapshots you're not using it for and then "ON' for the ones that you are using it for.   The other "version" of the pedal or amp will then switch "ON" when the first one is "OFF", etc... 

So it IS possible, you just don't typically have enough DSP to do this AND have a lot of effects blocks as well - but it makes for a wonderful preset that can get you through an entire gig, if you want.

The other cool thing about changing parameters in general, is that we have access to parameters via Helix that you could never do on-stage with a pedal or amp.  Example - Amp "Bias" and similar controls... some pedals, like the "Kinky Boost" (an EP Boost model) you can turn on or off the "bright" switch... on the real pedal, you would be taking the pedal apart and switching DIP switches inside the pedal to make that change (or having two pedals on your board set up differently).   

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