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kennyhickey

Headphone volume knob

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New Helix user here. When using the Helix with headphones should the headphone volume knob be set all the way up and the volume be adjusted from the output ‘block’ (not sure is that’s the correct term) and/or the amp block. I’m finding that I havie to increase the output block levels to get a decent volume when the headphone volume knob is at 12 o’clock ish. I know I could increase the headphone volume knob level, just wondering what the consensus is. I’m using Beyerdynamic DT 770 250ohm which sound good, I tried several different cans before settling on these. Thanks.

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Just turn the volume knob till it is loud enough. 

Different cans have different loudness due to different ohms. So there can not be a "consensus". 

Just turn it up and be glad. 

 

Of course you should make sure that you don't peak you signal anywhere but that is another question. 

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The reason I’m asking is that I recall.reading in a different thread that when using the Helix without headphones the main volume knob should be set all the way up,for some reason. Wondering if the same applies  with the headphone volume knob. 

 

Trust me, I am happy with this awesome piece of gear.

 

Many more dumb questions  to come. : )

 

thaank for for the reply.

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Yeah, but if you read this entire forum, you will see tons of ideas of where the volume knobs should be for the perfect tone... Don't trust any of them (including me)... Just use your ears... 

There is no difference and the output is plenty loud that you not HAVE to set the volume at max... 

Congrats on your cool gear! 

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4 hours ago, kennyhickey said:

The reason I’m asking is that I recall.reading in a different thread that when using the Helix without headphones the main volume knob should be set all the way up,for some reason.

 

If it makes you feel any better, doing that never made any sense to me... if your master volume is dimed all the time, you have no headroom. If you need a little more volume, then what? In a live situation, you can't go combing through every patch you're gonna use that night to boost the output blocks. I use an L2T as a floor monitor, and the master volume on that thing is at the back, facing the floor... not exactly convenient to get at,  if need a boost. I leave the L2T's master volume around noon, and I rarely have to have Helix's master volume much past 10 or 11 o'clock....any more than that and I'll blow myself into next week. 

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2 hours ago, cruisinon2 said:

 

I rarely have to have Helix's master volume much past 10 or 11 o'clock....any more than that and I'll blow myself into next week. 

^This. Any time I creep past 10 o'clock I tend to get clipping. Besides volume can be controlled in so many different ways with the Helix there is no "Wrong" way to go about it. Just get the thing to a workable level for your ears and play with the eq and outputs within that spectrum. If you hear clipping, back down the master and fiddle with the output or build a boost as a parameter setting. If all sounds well then crank the master knob until you hit the sweet spot for your cans. Also impedance is important. Make sure you are using cans with a high enough resistance.  I personally don't get good volume out of any cans under 200 ohms. Any less and the helix drives them way overboard to the point of sounding dull and quiet.  So that's a factor. 
The point is, there are many right ways to find volume, not really any wrong ones. Just watch for clipping, check your ohms, and use you ears. 

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6 minutes ago, homegrownbuddy said:

^This. Any time I creep past 10 o'clock I tend to get clipping. Besides volume can be controlled in so many different ways with the Helix there is no "Wrong" way to go about it. Just get the thing to a workable level for your ears and play with the eq and outputs within that spectrum. If you hear clipping, back down the master and fiddle with the output or build a boost as a parameter setting. If all sounds well then crank the master knob until you hit the sweet spot for your cans. Also impedance is important. Make sure you are using cans with a high enough resistance.  I personally don't get good volume out of any cans under 200 ohms. Any less and the helix drives them way overboard to the point of sounding dull and quiet.  So that's a factor. 
The point is, there are many right ways to find volume, not really any wrong ones. Just watch for clipping, check your ohms, and use you ears. 

 

I've never owned high impedance cans...I'm using AKG 701's at present, which are all of 55 ohms. I'm direct monitoring from a Focusrite interface, and the only time I've ever had any clipping is if I was also listening back to recorded tracks from the DAW, and those output levels were a little too hot... but I can crank the final headphone out on the Focusrite to a point where the volume will become unpleasant long before clipping sets in. I suppose if one were to use really crappy, super low impedance cans or ear buds, clipping may be more of an issue at lower volumes, but its never been a problem for me. 

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I too have a set of BeyerDynamic DT 770 (250 Ohms @ 96dB/Mw), and a set of Sony MDR-V6 (60 Ohms @ 106dB/mW), and a set of Shure SE530 IEMs (36 Ohms @ 119dB/mW). With the Helix Floor they each sound good but distinct, and the Headphone knob is set to a different preferred position with each to attain the same perceived SPL. So long as you are otherwise not clipping the signal in your Helix Signal Chain, the headphone volume knob is strictly for monitoring. Until the Helix has some method of onboard metering indication, the best you can do is connect a board or other device with meters to monitor your levels. If you have Helix Native software it has Input and Output metering displays, but is also very dependent on the level settings of your Interface input device, and your hosting VST or DAW software. Overall, it is always best to follow your ears. 

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