Jump to content
Maidlife

Low-high cut also on reverb block?

Recommended Posts

Hi, after a month of getting frustrated trying to find the tone I want, I started to use low and high cuts on the CAB and just WOOOW, that was all I needed, specially for a Mesa amp/cab that has so much bad freq, but then I realized that the  reverb block also has a low/bass pass filter, which I’m turning off since it comes with a default setting that cuts the lows and highs...so I have two questions.

 

1) why do we have a low high pass filter in the reverb if we are already cutting from the cab block? - for those who use real cab because they don’t need a cab block? 

 

2) if I set the low cut at 110hz and high at 8.0khz on the cab block, makes it any sense to cut it again on the reverb block at the same freq or for exameple at 100hz 9.0khz? If that freq are already being filtered on the cab block 

 

thanks in advance. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you misunderstand what the cuts do on the reverb (and delays).  These are EQ only on the bounced sound - not the main signal.

Think this way - you have an echo with just one repeat.  The initial note is not affected, but the repeat is.

It is common to want the delayed sound to be less bright than the original note - it makes for sweet sounding delay and helps repeats blend into the sound.

It has nothing to do with the overall cuts which affect everything.

Incidentally, if 8KHz works well for you then fine, but the idea of cuts on the cab block is to simulate speaker response, and it would not be unusual to have a cut at 5Khz - so don't feel worried that it looks like you are throwing away too much of your sound spectrum - it's all outside a bright sounding guitar anyhow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, rvroberts said:

I think you misunderstand what the cuts do on the reverb (and delays).  These are EQ only on the bounced sound - not the main signal.

Think this way - you have an echo with just one repeat.  The initial note is not affected, but the repeat is.

It is common to want the delayed sound to be less bright than the original note - it makes for sweet sounding delay and helps repeats blend into the sound.

It has nothing to do with the overall cuts which affect everything.

Incidentally, if 8KHz works well for you then fine, but the idea of cuts on the cab block is to simulate speaker response, and it would not be unusual to have a cut at 5Khz - so don't feel worried that it looks like you are throwing away too much of your sound spectrum - it's all outside a bright sounding guitar anyhow.

Thank you so much! It was so good explained :) have a nice day!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another thing is that High/low cut in the reverb block really matters when in a full mix.

 

Low frequency build up is easy to accomplish with just instruments without any reverb, or delay.  Now when you have a sustained, or repeated sound (like reverb, or delay) that increases that frequency build up.

 

This can create frequency masking, and muddying up your mix real quick. For instance you don't want your bass guitar combating with the reverb from your kick drum, or the low end rumble from the reverb of guitars. (tightening up these sounds gives the rest of the instruments more room to sit in the mix)

 

The Helix wasn't made soley for only guitarists. It was also made for the recording musician, and even mixing/audio engineers. That is why it has the interface that it has. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Lachdanan0121 said:

Another thing is that High/low cut in the reverb block really matters when in a full mix.

 

Low frequency build up is easy to accomplish with just instruments without any reverb, or delay.  Now when you have a sustained, or repeated sound (like reverb, or delay) that increases that frequency build up.

 

This can create frequency masking, and muddying up your mix real quick. For instance you don't want your bass guitar combating with the reverb from your kick drum, or the low end rumble from the reverb of guitars. (tightening up these sounds gives the rest of the instruments more room to sit in the mix)

 

The Helix wasn't made soley for only guitarists. It was also made for the recording musician, and even mixing/audio engineers. That is why it has the interface that it has. 

Ooooh Thanks for the additional info!! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everybody has written very helpful information.

I just want to add that in live music, I generally use only the plate reverb, with a very low mix, and anyway I use aggressive tone cuts (of the reverb) around 200Hz and 3kHz; in my opinion it is much better this way to avoid any harsh sound, and it also reduces the muddiness and confusion that the reverb can add on top of the natural reverb of the place where you play. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...