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Axxxeman

One for the specialists: frequency split or filter

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Folks, I got a special problem. I am a guitarist (mostly rhythm guitar) and since several months our band cannot find a good bassist. I am considering the following idea:

  • signal path A should go by 4cm into the amp (standard guitar amp)
  • signal path B is used to produce a bass sound (octaver, compressor, bass amp simulation --> directly into FOH)

Problem is: I would want only the low notes of the guitar going into the bass signal path to not mudden the bass sound up. So I would need some filter that is letting through only the notes I play on the low E- and A-string in the range of little more than an octave. Meaning, every note that is played, that is higher than let's say f# should be filtered out. So I still could play chords, while signal path B would only process single line bass notes. That's about the idea.

 

My question is: Can that be realized with a Helix and if so ... HOW?

 

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IME experience with this, without a split pickup like a Roland or Variax, there really isn't a way to do this really cleanly like you're suggesting. Any harmonic information before your filter/split that reaches into the cutoff is going to be present, so even if you're technically fretting outside the range of your split/cutoff overtones/undertones may still be present and will be amplified by your "bass" rig. The only time this really works the way its intended for me (again, you may have better luck) is with single-note lines and just turning the bass rig signal chain off when I don't want any muddy/octave stuff. 

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13 minutes ago, Axxxeman said:

My question is: Can that be realized with a Helix and if so ... HOW?

 

 

Nope. To the best of my knowledge, no such device exists. You can't cherry pick specific notes to be routed to one path, but not the other. 

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Get a Variax and set the pitch of the E and A strings an octave down...

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Well, I am no expert, but I heard that it is possible to set an EQ in a way that a standard recording is turned into a karaoke version by just filtering out the voices' frequencies. If this is possible, filtering out deep notes should be possible, too, shouldn't it? I just have no idea how to set an EQ like this ...

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4 minutes ago, Axxxeman said:

Well, I am no expert, but I heard that it is possible to set an EQ in a way that a standard recording is turned into a karaoke version by just filtering out the voices' frequencies. If this is possible, filtering out deep notes should be possible, too, shouldn't it? I just have no idea how to set an EQ like this ...

There's usually a lot more going on than a simple EQ filter (phase filtering, dynamic frequency dependent compression) in those karaoke mixes, and if you've ever used an automated one that takes album recordings and makes them into karaoke versions, there is ALWAYS some leak from the lead vocal unless its a really old stereo recording with no spatial FX on the vocals. You could theoretically have a hard LP filter with an extreme slope set at 500Hz (or wherever you deem it necessary), but its going to require a very careful touch to get it so fill in bass frequnecies and not sound strange. I see quite a few two-piece bands with a guitarist simulating a bass/guitar rig, but they're usually doing a on/off thing and playing single note lines where they need the bass and guitar to match up, or just dealing with the muddiness that comes from playing chords into an octave pedal. A multi-output pickup is the ideal solution. 

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Well, a multi-output signal is no option at the moment. But I will try a low pass filter, combined with an EQ to see whether that can get me anywhere. Thanks!

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