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FelixAnger

Wireless receiver and transmitter in the same rack with P180 antennas

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I posted this in another thread, but after seeing no responses checked and saw that the most recent post in that thread was 4 years ago, so I'm posting as a new topic.

 

I was thinking about getting a pair of the p180 directional antennas. I know you recommend placing any wireless IEM transmitters at least a meter away from the Wireless receivers.  Would using the external directional antennas alleviate this problem by moving the reception point multiple meters away, thus allowing me to keep my wireless receiver and IEM transmitter in the same rack, or is the proximity of the receiver and transmitter to one another still a problem even with external antennas placed at a distance?  What about if an external antenna were used on the IEM transmitter as well and placed out of the field of the receiver antennas' coverage?

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My recent experience with XD-V75 receivers is that they receive a sufficiently strong signal to work without any antennas connected at all (1/2 wave or P180) when the transmitter (handheld XD-V75 microphone) is within a few feet of the receiver. In other words, the antenna connector itself acts as an antenna for very short distances.

 

So I would expect that the adjacent IEM transmitter would be seen as interfence by a wireless receiver in the same rack. Can't say for sure because I haven't actually done or tested this - just reporting my experience in observing that a wireless signal is still received by a nearby transmitter even with no antenna connected.

 

EDIT: I have no experience with IEMs but I believe they typically operate in the 600MHz bandwidth while the Line 6 XD-V wireless mics (for which you would be using the P180 antennas) operate in the 2.4GHz bandwidth. So even if the XD-V receiver is picking up the IEM transmission I don't know if it would amount to interference. Others will be more knowledgeable about this.

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A strong transmission on any frequency can be problematic as it can overload the first stage of the receiver circuitry, preventing it from picking up the wanted signal.

When you plug in the (shielded) BNC cable to the remote antennae, you're preventing pickup of unwanted nearby signals; the antenna connector can no longer act as an antenna once something is plugged in to it.

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