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Martijn21

The volume range of a power amp

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Greetings, 

 

I'd like to play my POD HD500 through my 4x12 cab and I read that I need a power amp for that. 
The ideal situation for me would be to have the option to play at bed room volume for home use, but still be able to go loud enough for live situations.
There are amps like the Peavey 6505 Mini Head that have wattage switches that could work for me, but I'd like to use the amp simulation of the Pod HD500.

I have no experience with power amps, so I'm wondering what volume ranges a regular power amp has and if there are power amps that provide capabilities that are similar to those of a mini head.

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if you have a 4x12, you have a power amp, otherwise your cab doesn't work

you may be calling it a head, but it is a power amp. it is just a power amp that is "flavoured". 

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what exactly is "bedroom" and "live" volume. 

For 30 years, I used 1 amp with 1 volume. It wasn't a tube amp. It wasn't a 4x12. It was a 65 watt solid state combo with a 1x12. 

 

Do what you gotta do to get your tone, and then let the PA and monitors do the rest. 

 

 

And, if you are in a tiny, little, thin-walled apartment and can't play at 3am because of your neighbors - you aren't going to be concerned with tone, so it doesn't really matter if it sounds pretty or not. 

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1 hour ago, Martijn21 said:

but I'd like to use the amp simulation of the Pod HD500.

 

Truth is, if you are trying to get "true tone", you should also skip your guitar cab because it will also color the tone.

Skip the amp. Skip the cab. Get a sterile system that lets you hear the Pod as it was designed. 

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2 hours ago, Martijn21 said:

Greetings, 

 

I'd like to play my POD HD500 through my 4x12 cab and I read that I need a power amp for that. 
The ideal situation for me would be to have the option to play at bed room volume for home use, but still be able to go loud enough for live situations.
There are amps like the Peavey 6505 Mini Head that have wattage switches that could work for me, but I'd like to use the amp simulation of the Pod HD500.

I have no experience with power amps, so I'm wondering what volume ranges a regular power amp has and if there are power amps that provide capabilities that are similar to those of a mini head.

 

You're over thinking it. Anything can play at bedroom volume, so forget about that. If you need to be heard over a drummer, as a general rule go with anything 50W and up if it's a tube amp, and 200W or more if it's sold state... and bear in mind that these are very general numbers. I've played through 15W tube amps that could melt concrete, and 200W solid state amps that were "loud enough", but didn't have a tremendous amount of headroom left at typical stage volumes.

 

Just make sure the impedance ratings match, and don't worry too much about it. In 25+ years of gigging, I've never had a situation where I had wrung every last decibel out an amp, but still couldn't be heard. You're not trying to fill a stadium with noise from one amp and a 4x12... almost anything that's readily available to Joe Average will be sufficiently loud.

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16 hours ago, pianoguyy said:

if you have a 4x12, you have a power amp, otherwise your cab doesn't work

you may be calling it a head, but it is a power amp. it is just a power amp that is "flavoured". 

Well, I had a Preavey 6505+ Amp with a 5150 4x12 cab. I sold the amp, but I couldn't sell the cab for a price I wanted. It has Sheffield speakers, which a lot of people don't like. So you're right my cab doesn't work right now. And I was curious if I could get it to work with my Pod.

 

16 hours ago, pianoguyy said:

what exactly is "bedroom" and "live" volume. 

For 30 years, I used 1 amp with 1 volume. It wasn't a tube amp. It wasn't a 4x12. It was a 65 watt solid state combo with a 1x12. 

 

Do what you gotta do to get your tone, and then let the PA and monitors do the rest. 

 

And, if you are in a tiny, little, thin-walled apartment and can't play at 3am because of your neighbors - you aren't going to be concerned with tone, so it doesn't really matter if it sounds pretty or not. 

What I mean with bedroom volume is that I can just play comfortably at home and not disturb the cat, dog and girlfriend "too" much. I now play on a solid state behringer combo with 2 speakers and 30w. Which volume wise is very doable. But this was definitly NOT possible with my peavey 6505+. I just was not able to turn it down enough. 

 

16 hours ago, pianoguyy said:

Truth is, if you are trying to get "true tone", you should also skip your guitar cab because it will also color the tone.

Skip the amp. Skip the cab. Get a sterile system that lets you hear the Pod as it was designed. 

 

Good point. Dragging a 4x12 around sucks and I can of course use the PA and monitors. If I play at home and adjust my tone to my cab and turn off cab simulation live, I have a different tone, which is going to happen in a different environment anyway but I'd like to avoid as much as possible. So that's probably the best choice. But I can't help myself and be curious as to what the cab sounds like to be honest. 

Thanks for the input Pianoguyy, much appreciated. 

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16 hours ago, cruisinon2 said:

You're over thinking it. Anything can play at bedroom volume, so forget about that. If you need to be heard over a drummer, as a general rule go with anything 50W and up if it's a tube amp, and 200W or more if it's sold state... and bear in mind that these are very general numbers. I've played through 15W tube amps that could melt concrete, and 200W solid state amps that were "loud enough", but didn't have a tremendous amount of headroom left at typical stage volumes.

 

Just make sure the impedance ratings match, and don't worry too much about it. In 25+ years of gigging, I've never had a situation where I had wrung every last decibel out an amp, but still couldn't be heard. You're not trying to fill a stadium with noise from one amp and a 4x12... almost anything that's readily available to Joe Average will be sufficiently loud.

Well, I used to play this cab with a Peavey 6505+ 120w. It did a great job with a full band, but at home I could not get the volume down enough to not bother the neighbours. But I realize now you mention it, I have a 30w solid state combo that can play just fine at home, but can go extremely loud if necessary. 

Thank you for yout reply, it definitly gave me something to think about. 

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17 hours ago, pianoguyy said:

Get a sterile system that lets you hear the Pod as it was designed. 

After thinking about it, this sounds very interesting to me. I'd like to have my own system instead of relying on the PA and having a sterile system gives me complete control. But what exactly is a sterile system? I know a power amp doesn't color the sound, but a cab always does right? 

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2 hours ago, Martijn21 said:

But what exactly is a sterile system? 

 

Studio monitors, and/or a FRFR PA speaker or monitor wedge.

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for educational use: 

https://www.sweetwater.com/insync/411-frfr-speakers/

https://blog.andertons.co.uk/learn/what-is-an-frfr-speaker-cabinet

 

 

If you are looking for "bedroom volume", get yourself a set of those $20 computer speakers. 

You know that they are loud enough to hear but won't disturb anyone. Plus, they won't break the bank (assuming your don't already own them). 

On the down side, they aren't FRFR (they are full range but lack the flat-response). So, tone creation is not advised. Also, at that volume, tone creation is not advised. 

 

And then it boils down to what to do live and in the studio (and at home when you aren't limited in volume). 

Me, knowing what I know, having access to what I have, I go ampless. I run direct. But, since not everyone is me - 

I would recommend using the XLR to go direct to the pa. That means that your "personal amplification device" needs to accept the 1/4" jacks. 

 

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Studio monitors, and/or a FRFR PA speaker or monitor wedge.

 

*also keyboard amps. personal pa systems (aka, pa on a stick). some acoustic guitar amps can be flat response but they lack full range. 

 

 

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Thank you for the replies!

The articles you mentioned are very informative as well. 

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