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With A Podhd500x - Computer Speakers Or Monitors?

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I have my PODHD500X under my desk and play through some Logitech computers speakers using the headphone jack. Since they are powered speakers with a sub woofer, it actually sounds pretty good. I am guessing that using an adapter from 1/4" to mini plug (headphone out) is not the best signal/sound possible.

 

Question: I was wondering if using the 1/4 outputs into powered monitors would be a noticeable improvement? I have a space issue and the new LT3 Line6 speaker is too pricey for me. Just wondered if any other players use the POD into speakers or powered monitors and what kind?

 

Thanks for your tips. B)

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Monitors all the way. I've come across very few computer speakers that I felt came anywhere near what most monitors will. You can get a fairly inexpensive monitor(s) that will get good results but as they are so subjective to the individual I will refrain from naming any brands. Now u decide active or passive.

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Great, I appreciate the feedback. I was thinking some 5 inch powered. I saw a few decent brands in the $149 a pair range that are giving me GAS.

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I know of no powered monitors in that price range that produce accurate results with the clear midrange crucial for getting your presets to sound correct recorded, and through quality full range systems.  Upgrading to inaccurate monitors is just not worth the money.  Phase/time alignment and DSP frequency compensation is really the way to go.  At ~$380 shipped, the Equator D5's are the best bang for buck going.  Although they have the option, balanced XLR's are not necessary for short cable runs.

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OP didn't actually mention recording/mixing, so upgrading to 'inaccurate' monitors could be exactly what they need, as long as it's an improvement over their existing kit. Changing to 1/4" outs will avoid the impedance imbalance issues you'll get using the 1/8" out, so you should notice an improvement, as long as the monitors aren't really rubbish.

 

I use 5" monitors myself, but my KRKs are in a similar price range to the Equators mentioned above so they won't be much use to you. There are certainly some pretty decent budget 5" monitors about though - Google is your friend.

 

Get an idea of what might be decent, then find out who stocks what locally - in that price range sound quality can be a matter of personal taste.

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I know of no powered monitors in that price range that produce accurate results with the clear midrange crucial for getting your presets to sound correct recorded

 

Strange, I've got the Yamaha HS5 (the successor to the HS50M) and the complaints I've seen are always for the lows and highs, never for the mids...

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Thanks for all the input so far!

 

I have a couple tube amps that I can plug into if need be, and am looking for something to fit on my desk. I rarely record anything that's why I never mentioned it. Just wanted to improve the output and figured a medium set of monitors would be better than computer speakers. As far as mids, I play in dropped tunings/heavy metal and mids are barely on, so I'd avoid Equator D5s if they have more mids, as I want less. I play live with mids on between 0 & 1.

 

My assumption is the 1/4 to 1/8 mini plug adapter I use through the headphone jack into computer speakers are no doubt robbing some sound quality and not stereo. I saw some JBLs and Mackie monitors  in the $149 range that I think may sound better. If it's noticeably better, I'm happy. I guess the question is what is noticeably different to what I have now, the powered computer speakers. I am hoping it will sound at least 33% better than the jury ridged speaker setup I have now, which would make me a buyer.

 

I just need to get a pair from GC (30 day no questions asked refund), plug them in a test the playback tone against the other speakers. :rolleyes: B)

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For roughly the money you mentioned, you could get some great headphones, and maybe a monitor simulation headphone amp. There are computer plugins that simulate monitors as well. You can get quite accurate mixes that translate very well to real speakers. If you are set on inexpensive passive monitors, consider the Tannoy Reveals for comparison.  I've also heard that Warfdale makes some great inexpensive passive monitors.  Otherwise, read on.

 

The HS5's were the monitors to beat in the low price range. They may incorporate phase-aligned crossovers and/or be time-aligned. Yamaha does not specify, so I doubt it. They're also in the same price range as the Equator D5's. The DSP correction essentially puts the D5's in a next generation category. They also have a 60-day money back policy. The price just went up to $400/pair...my bad. Check out the on-line reviews in Mix, SOS and EM Magazines.

 

Crossover overlap distortion is an issue in multiple speaker enclosures. D5's don't have more midrange. They have clearer midrange than other speakers in the ~1-3kHz region due to the phase-aligned crossover and the physical time and position alignment. 1-3kHz is mostly within the critical hearing range (2-4kHz), and is the most significant region concerning guitar tone definition -- as well as for many other vocal-range instruments. If something is off in that region, the sound can easily be harsh, edgy, "phasey", or just ill-defined. Guitar amp tone stack midrange is centered around the ~500Hz region, so it's not the same thing at all. The D5 single point source coaxial design is also better for stereo image accuracy with a wider sweet spot in a close-field setup.

 

Ted Keffalo (formally of KEF and Event), is a major mover in the audio world...and a master of all time and space (pun intended). ;) I have the Event ALP5 time/phase-aligned 5" monitors -- the last model Ted designed when at Event. The highs are essentially flat/even and sweet. Bass response is outstanding for the size: -3dB at 53Hz, just like the D5's -- more typical of an 8" monitor. The highs and bass are the more obvious aspects people hear when comparing monitors. The D5's reportedly have non-colored highs provided by a non ear-fatiguing silk dome tweeter. They also have the lowest in class bass-extension -- probably just like my ALP5's, but clearer due to the DSP correction.

 

No speaker is near as flat as manufacturer FR graphs would indicate. The response is commonly smoothed out to 1/3 octave -- meaning the many variances occurring inside those 1/3 octaves are not represented. The only way to compensate for those variances is with DSP correction specifically designed for the speaker. DSP filtering has developed to the point in recent years of being virtually transparent with no audible artifacts.

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Okay, so I'm convinced that it's best for me to stay with what I have, I'm not into spending more than I paid for the POD, if I need better tone, I can plug into my MarkV or H&K amps. Thanks for saving me $$

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Sorry if what I wrote was overwhelming.  The important thing to be aware of is how the Xover in your speaker affects the response in the overlapping range.  Some passive Xover designs have flatter response than others.  You can probably get some passive speakers that are very good in that respect for under $200.  No reason you have to get active speakers if you have a decent amp.  This article shows the response of some common passive Xover designs:  http://sound.westhost.com/ptd.htm#s2

 

The response of the design in fig. 8 would be best for your application, because the variance is small, and a slight compensating boost around 1.5kHz on your part would not be hard on the audience's ears like a larger boost between 2.5-3kHz would be.  So, check out the Xover frequency point and design of whatever passive speakers you consider.  Maybe look into some Warfedales.  Something with the drivers aligned to the same distance from the listener might be worth considering as well.  My brother got a decent old pair of 2-way JBL home listening speakers with an 8" woofer and silk dome tweeter for $5 at a yard sale.  They aren't good for close-monitoring because of the distance between the drivers, but they are fantastic for what he paid for them. 

 

Whatever you get, you'll want to elevate them off the surface of your desk up to ear level to minimize treble slurring reflections and bass/mid coloring.  Keep them several inches away from the back wall as well.  If you set them on either side of a PC screen, I'd place them so the inside edge of the cabinets are flush with the screen surface.  I also drape a thick towel over my desk when mixing.  If there is a wall right behind your head, you should probably hang something on it to damp hi frequency reflections as well.  Acoustically treating your room is usually not necessary for close-field monitoring.

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