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Digital distortion

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Hello! I have a little problem. I hear a faint digital distortion even in some clear tones. I'm using it with a Gibson Les Paul. I trust that only the input or output level is not properly set. I tried to change the input impedance but the situation did not change. Could someone help me? Has anyone had a similar comment?

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Theoretically, you could be clipping at any point in the signal chain. Without knowing what else is in your rig, what you're monitoring with, and what individual blocks you have in the patch, it's gonna be difficult for anyone to help you. Without more info,  the best anyone can suggest is turning off blocks one at a time to see if the symptom goes away... might help to narrow down where it's coming from. Once you find the culprit (if there is one), most, if not all FX blocks will have an adjustable output parameter.

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It's unlikely that you're actually clipping the guitar in, but it's not impossible. Do you have the Input Pad turned on? The test to see if you're actually clipping the input is to go to a blank preset with no blocks in it and play through that. If you hear clipping in that scenario, that would mean you're clipping the input. If not, it means you're probably overloading something in your signal chain. The blocks in a preset don't really clip, but they can be pushed to the point where they overload. It's kind of modeled clipping.

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If that doesn't help, you may have squirrels. No, really, they're a thing. Search here and on the digital and modeling forum on The Gear Page.

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obviously the posts about identifying your set-up and signal chain are the most important thing here, but...

 

How do you know you are hearing "Digital" distortion?

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Such a strange buzzing sound is not like when an amplifier distorts. So an unpleasant voice.

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Yeah, and I noticed it with headphones. So there is nothing else in the chain except the guitar Helix LT and the headphones.
I also tried to replace the headphones. By the way, I noticed AKG headphones, but then I tried the Audiotechnika M50 as well.

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From the manual

 

Quote

27. PHONES Out (12Ω) Connect stereo headphones here; turn the top panel PHONES knob to adjust volume. NOTE: Helix provides plenty of gain for high impedance headphones. With lower impedance headphones, you may notice a bit of distortion if the PHONES knob is turned all the way up. This is normal.

 

 

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Thanks. Then that could be the problem. Although the AT - M50 is a studio headphone, its impedance is not low.
I'm still thinking that the input that has an impedance adjustment option there should be fine for me. Right now it's automatic. Isn't there a recipe for the impedance of a Les Paul guitar pickup set there?

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8 hours ago, ezut said:

Thanks. Then that could be the problem.

 

Then turn down the headphones output volume and see if the buzz goes away and let us know...

 

8 hours ago, ezut said:

I'm still thinking that the input that has an impedance adjustment option there should be fine for me. Right now it's automatic. Isn't there a recipe for the impedance of a Les Paul guitar pickup set there?

 

In the manual - which I recommend reading when you have issues - on page 18 you will find reference to the input In-Z option which can alter input impedance:

 

https://line6.com/data/6/0a020a4010c935bb66a4c0c44f/application/pdf/HX Stomp Manual - English .pdf

 

 

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2 hours ago, BBD_123 said:

 

Then turn down the headphones output volume and see if the buzz goes away and let us know...

 

Yep. Then use the amp blocks master volume to bring the level back up.

 

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14 hours ago, mjc009 said:

Yep. Then use the amp blocks master volume to bring the level back up.

 

Best to use the amp block Channel Volume. The Master Vol controls the amp's power stage and for amps that don't have a master volume IRL it should always be set to 10 and left alone, or you mess up the tone. The Channel Volume sets the output level for the block as a whole without affecting the modeled power stage at all.

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6 hours ago, BBD_123 said:

 

Best to use the amp block Channel Volume. The Master Vol controls the amp's power stage and for amps that don't have a master volume IRL it should always be set to 10 and left alone, or you mess up the tone. The Channel Volume sets the output level for the block as a whole without affecting the modeled power stage at all.

 

The Amp Block's Channel Volume will affect everything downstream, so I prefer to use the Output Block, or a Gain Block right before the Output Block.

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9 minutes ago, rd2rk said:

The Amp Block's Channel Volume will affect everything downstream, so I prefer to use the Output Block, or a Gain Block right before the Output Block.

 

Good point, but what I do to avoid walloping blocks downstream from the amp is to establish something close to unity gain right from the outset. I start with an empty patch, then add the cab block and A/B for parity gain (it's often necessary to increase the cab block output). Then I add the amp block and do the same using amp block channel volume. Once that's done, there's no danger of accidentally blasting anything downstream. Also, most patches tend to come out within hailing distance of each other gain-wise, which is an added bonus :-)

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19 minutes ago, BBD_123 said:

 

Good point, but what I do to avoid walloping blocks downstream from the amp is to establish something close to unity gain right from the outset. I start with an empty patch, then add the cab block and A/B for parity gain (it's often necessary to increase the cab block output). Then I add the amp block and do the same using amp block channel volume. Once that's done, there's no danger of accidentally blasting anything downstream. Also, most patches tend to come out within hailing distance of each other gain-wise, which is an added bonus :-)

 

Best Practice, for sure. I pointed it out because I so often see people recommending the Amp Channel Volume for leveling presets. Just something to be aware of once you've carefully gain staged a preset.

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