Jump to content
YammerUK

Overwhelmed

Recommended Posts

Hi, all

 

I think I've just about got used to my new Helix LT operation. But I'm starting to realise that I have another big hurdle to jump: Models and their usage.

 

As someone who hasn't spent a fortune on pedals, most of the names of the effects models (once 'decoded' to their original trademarks) are still pretty much unknown to me. It's proving difficult to know where to start. I'll give you an example...

 

I wanted to build a preset including a compressor for soloing. I think I counted 5 compressors. They all work differently. Some of them seem to work better after the amp/cab model, and some before. Some of the control descriptions are a bit vague, and some are highly technical. Some of the controls don't seem to do anything, and some models don't seem to work well in any settings.

 

And that's just the compressors!

 

Without having to become an expert in all "62 Amps, 37 Cabs, 16 Microphones, and 104 Effects", is there a guide anywhere to the best use of individual models, and where and how they work best?

 

It's probably a big ask, but I thought I'd try anyway. I saw the helix help website, which helps decodes the funny names, but doesn't go on to give any clues for usage.

 

Any pointers would be greatly appreciated.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once you've decoded the funny names, go to the mfr's website and DL the manual, or google for the original manual.

That won't help with the L6 originals, but learning the real world devices will help you to figure out the originals.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

YMMV, but I would start with an empty patch and an idea of a sound you are looking for. Cycle through amps with no regard for the model being represented until you find one that gets close to your ideal without touching a knob. Do the same for each effect you add. Find a model that gets closest to your ideal.  Don't fret about which model you end up with, and save the knobs for fine tuning.

 

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's really hard to point to specific FX for specific things unless you have an exact tone you're chasing, and even harder for someone without your ears/gear to tell you what is going to work. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Imagine how overwhelmed you would be if you had all the hardware versions of the items that were in the Helix :) 

 

This is my suggestion....

  • Decide on ONE TONE you are after
  • Look online for a rig rundown, or see if others are talking about how to get that tone
  • Setup a similar setup in the Helix.... learn the effects as needed. 

Once you do that 5 -10 times you will start to understand a few differences between similar effects. Over time (and only over time) will the knowledge begin to stick.

IMO: Hearing how it all interacts is the ONLY WAY to understand, no explanations can really do it on their own. 

 

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Noob here, so this is what I suggest.  Pick a song you like/want to play that has FX and see if there is a preset out there for it, and then fiddle with the included FX.  Don't bite the whole elephant at once. Go from known (song/sound you like) to unknown (free range experimentation).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, YammerUK said:

most of the names of the effects models (once 'decoded' to their original trademarks) are still pretty much unknown to me.

 

Further to my post above....

 

If it makes you feel any better, I've been in the business at a pro level for nearly 40 years.... I have little to zero experience with at least half the the amps/cabs/effects included in the Helix.   When I dial in one of those unknowns (to me), I'm no different from you in trying to figure out what it is suppose to be good for :)  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, rd2rk said:

Once you've decoded the funny names, go to the mfr's website and DL the manual, or google for the original manual.

Ah. Good idea. Thanks.

 

11 hours ago, j_hotch said:

YMMV, but I would start with an empty patch and an idea of a sound you are looking for. Cycle through amps with no regard for the model being represented until you find one that gets close to your ideal without touching a knob. Do the same for each effect you add. Find a model that gets closest to your ideal.  Don't fret about which model you end up with, and save the knobs for fine tuning.

That's what I've been doing so far, and it isn't working.

 

11 hours ago, codamedia said:
  • Decide on ONE TONE you are after
  • Look online for a rig rundown, or see if others are talking about how to get that tone
  • Setup a similar setup in the Helix.... learn the effects as needed. 

 

Once you do that 5 -10 times you will start to understand a few differences between similar effects. Over time (and only over time) will the knowledge begin to stick.

IMO: Hearing how it all interacts is the ONLY WAY to understand, no explanations can really do it on their own.

That sounds like a LOT of work. I'm allergic to hard work.

 

10 hours ago, Lone_Poor_Boy said:

Noob here, so this is what I suggest.  Pick a song you like/want to play that has FX and see if there is a preset out there for it, and then fiddle with the included FX.  Don't bite the whole elephant at once. Go from known (song/sound you like) to unknown (free range experimentation).

Right. This is something I haven't looked into yet. Where do I go for 3rd party presets like these? Are there dedicated websites? If so, what do you recommend?

 

To be honest, I'm a bit disappointed that Line 6 hasn't got this covered. I mean, they've gone to the trouble, time and expense of creating models for each of these amps and effects, but they haven't documented any of it? Seems hard to fathom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, torgeirthoresen said:

Here's a few useful links, both for help in decoding the funny names and checking out tones from others for inspiration

https://dshowmusic.com/line-6-helix-amp-models/

https://dshowmusic.com/line-6-helix-effect-models/

https://line6.com/customtone/browse/helix/

https://shop.line6.com/marketplace/

 

Thanks!

I actually spotted the 'Customtone' link at the top of the page, after I clicked Submit. Duh!
Is this the main place for presets, or are there other libraries I should know about?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, YammerUK said:

That sounds like a LOT of work. I'm allergic to hard work.


Oh, I see. Obviously so allergic that not only did you miss the link to CustomTone, you also didn’t see the link at the top of the forum in the large black banner with the title:

 

Templates and Tones from L6 Tone made easy classes 

 

If it is too difficult for you to scroll back to the top of this page - here’s the link.

 

https://line6.com/tone-templates/

 

Note: regarding Customtone.

Yes, it is possibly the biggest repository of Helix presets, but be aware that many of them will not sound as you might expect. They may not even come close to the description given for them. Why? Because, unless you have the exact same guitar, string gauge, pick technique and about another million little things that makes each of us unique - it just ain’t gonna happen. Better get used to it, you bought into this digital audio game now you will have to learn how to make it work for you. The users of this forum can usually help out with technical issues, but learning how to fly this thing is a different matter. Experiment - you have noting to lose and everything to gain.

 

Oh, yeah! Be prepared for some hard work.

 

Have fun!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, YammerUK said:

That sounds like a LOT of work. I'm allergic to hard work.

 

IMO... hard work pays off!

 

I guess custom tone downloads will get you going with minimal effort. But you still won't know why something was used, how it works, and why you should use it. You can learn the material or you can download the answers and put blind trust in them. It's your choice!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First off, regarding your idea of using a compressor as a solo boost (which is a pretty valid idea): Did you do it that way in the analog world before buying a Helix? If so, which compressor did you use? There might be one to get you close to the one you've used - but you should know what to look for. Or maybe you've just been reading about this boost method. In that case, try to find out what was used or recommended. Again, there might be an appropriate solution in the Helix. Fwiw, personally, I'm usually using the Deluxe Comp, might as well be because it's the first to pop up in the list (and btw, there's 7 more from the legacy collection...). Fwiw #2, I wish there was a clone of a Diamond Compressor - been using a Mooer clone (Yellow Comp) on my analog board for years and for my boosting needs it was just about perfect and super easy to adjust.

 

Regarding general "procedures", what I was (and still am, even regularly) doing is to just go through the amp models (ok, I'm doing it with other blocks as well, but these are most crucial), using a single general purpose IR (I have some I've shot and mixed myself, could easily share them in case there's interest) and then just check out what the amp models can do, completely regardless of what a) their original intentions and b) their default settings were. I still remember that one of the most excellent jazzy-ish clean tones I've ever gotten from a real amp was through a Marshall JCM 800 combo. Given whatever Marshall's intentions might have been back in the days, it's unlikely they had jazz players in mind. And when it comes to the default settings of any of the Marshall type amps in the Helix, it's as unlikely their creators at Line 6 had that in mind, too. They're doing the very job quite fine in the Helix, though, so there's plenty of things to explore (make sure to check all parameters regarding the gain structure, mainly drive, master and sag, with some models they act extremely different and obviously they all interact with each other).

 

Extra tip: Place a looper at the beginning of the signal chain and record something into it. Makes up for a way better editing experience as the looper is playing your guitar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, datacommando said:


Oh, I see. Obviously so allergic that not only did you miss the link to CustomTone, you also didn’t see the link at the top of the forum in the large black banner with the title:

 

Templates and Tones from L6 Tone made easy classes 

 

If it is too difficult for you to scroll back to the top of this page - here’s the link.

 

https://line6.com/tone-templates/

 

Note: regarding Customtone.

Yes, it is possibly the biggest repository of Helix presets, but be aware that many of them will not sound as you might expect. They may not even come close to the description given for them. Why? Because, unless you have the exact same guitar, string gauge, pick technique and about another million little things that makes each of us unique - it just ain’t gonna happen. Better get used to it, you bought into this digital audio game now you will have to learn how to make it work for you. The users of this forum can usually help out with technical issues, but learning how to fly this thing is a different matter. Experiment - you have noting to lose and everything to gain.

 

Oh, yeah! Be prepared for some hard work.

 

Have fun!

OUCH! That burned.

 

In my defence, I'm only averse to hard work — I can do it if I absolutely really have to.

Also in my defence — "customtone" doesn't ooze self-explanation. I clicked it out of curiosity after my first post this morning, but I'm trying to avoid reading the entire Line 6 website by asking for pointers. I'd rather be playing with the Helix, which I'm finding to be awesome. I did read some of the FAQs and pinned posts, honest.

 

Thanks for the link to the famous guitarists' rigs (helpfully labelled "tone templates"). That is quite useful, although I could do with David Gilmour telling me what the knobs do too. That was a joke, by the way.

 

Kool Lazy Keith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, YammerUK said:

OUCH! That burned.

 

In my defence, I'm only averse to hard work — I can do it if I absolutely really have to.

Also in my defence — "customtone" doesn't ooze self-explanation. I clicked it out of curiosity after my first post this morning, but I'm trying to avoid reading the entire Line 6 website by asking for pointers. I'd rather be playing with the Helix, which I'm finding to be awesome. I did read some of the FAQs and pinned posts, honest.

 

Thanks for the link to the famous guitarists' rigs (helpfully labelled "tone templates"). That is quite useful, although I could do with David Gilmour telling me what the knobs do too. That was a joke, by the way.

 

Kool Lazy Keith

 

Hi, again, Keith,

 

I wasn't being scathing and meaning what I said as a nasty dig - it was more by way of a reality check. I never cease to be amazed by people who spend a large chunk of cash on a piece of digital wizardry and then, and only then, realise that the thing doesn't play itself or turn you into Joe Satriani. It takes work, and yes, you "absolutely really have to".

 

I wonder how many people have bought a Keeley Dark Side Pedal after seeing the cool demo videos, then when they got home realised that it doesn't come pre-loaded with skill and talent to the level of a certain Mr David Gilmour. Why does David Gilmour sound like that? Maybe because he is David Gilmour, there isn't another.

 

Practice messing around with stuff until it sounds good, or a sound you really like and develop that. You can't really hurt a Helix (LT) they're real tough and if you screw up the presets a simple reload or reset works. It's not like the real world hardware were you could essential fry a stack of expensive equipment by plugging in the wrong thing. 

 

Remember -   Always work on a copy - play with it and have fun.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, SaschaFranck said:

First off, regarding your idea of using a compressor as a solo boost (which is a pretty valid idea): Did you do it that way in the analog world before buying a Helix? If so, which compressor did you use? There might be one to get you close to the one you've used - but you should know what to look for. Or maybe you've just been reading about this boost method. In that case, try to find out what was used or recommended. Again, there might be an appropriate solution in the Helix. Fwiw, personally, I'm usually using the Deluxe Comp, might as well be because it's the first to pop up in the list (and btw, there's 7 more from the legacy collection...). Fwiw #2, I wish there was a clone of a Diamond Compressor - been using a Mooer clone (Yellow Comp) on my analog board for years and for my boosting needs it was just about perfect and super easy to adjust.

 

I started playing electric guitar in the late 70s, and that was the way I've always done it: "Sustain" pedal first. When I built my first multi-effects unit, it went first. When I've subsequently bough multi-effects units, the compressor came at or near the start of the signal chain. I just assumed that was the way it's done.

 

My first sustain pedal was an electronics kit, it boosted the signal as the volume fell, until a threshold was reached and then it cut out gracefully. My bought MFX units were made by Boss (BE-5, ME-70, ME-80). I've never actually bought or used a compressor pedal.

 

Actually, I noticed that many of the factory presets use the LA Studio compressor - after the amp/cab. I've been adding this (with default settings) to my custom presets because I like the way it gives the sound a professional polish.

 

As for legacy compressors — mind=blown. I hadn't even spotted those yet!

 

47 minutes ago, SaschaFranck said:

Regarding general "procedures", what I was (and still am, even regularly) doing is to just go through the amp models (ok, I'm doing it with other blocks as well, but these are most crucial), using a single general purpose IR (I have some I've shot and mixed myself, could easily share them in case there's interest) and then just check out what the amp models can do, completely regardless of what a) their original intentions and b) their default settings were. I still remember that one of the most excellent jazzy-ish clean tones I've ever gotten from a real amp was through a Marshall JCM 800 combo. Given whatever Marshall's intentions might have been back in the days, it's unlikely they had jazz players in mind. And when it comes to the default settings of any of the Marshall type amps in the Helix, it's as unlikely their creators at Line 6 had that in mind, too. They're doing the very job quite fine in the Helix, though, so there's plenty of things to explore (make sure to check all parameters regarding the gain structure, mainly drive, master and sag, with some models they act extremely different and obviously they all interact with each other).

 

Yes, I've sort of being doing that already, though I probably haven't experimented enough with the more esoteric amp settings (must try Sag). I haven't even tried replacing cabs. I'm totally blown away by the amp simulations, and just playing with the factory settings has been a joy.

 

I've built up a few presets using basic pedals and different amps, just to get me started. And I've been assigning one footswitch to adjusting amp gain/volume, for a dirty alternative.

 

I've done a similar thing with a Marshall model (can't remember which right now - poss J45), which sounds great with the gain turned right down. The jumped super lead has given me hours of fun, recreating my youth.

 

47 minutes ago, SaschaFranck said:

Extra tip: Place a looper at the beginning of the signal chain and record something into it. Makes up for a way better editing experience as the looper is playing your guitar.

 

Genius. Great idea. Saves growing an extra pair of arms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, datacommando said:

I wasn't being scathing and meaning what I said as a nasty dig - it was more by way of a reality check. I never cease to be amazed by people who spend a large chunk of cash on a piece of digital wizardry and then, and only then, realise that the thing doesn't play itself or turn you into Joe Satriani. It takes work, and yes, you "absolutely really have to".

 

I used to work in IT Support, and "I read manuals so you don't have to". I've read the LT manual, and have nearly finished the second read. It's just a shame there isn't more info on the individual models. Like I said, they went to all the trouble of creating the models, a bit of documentation would have been a cool addition. Being lazy is great, because it forces you to come up with easy ways to do complicated and laborious tasks. Let's face it, who likes reinventing the wheel? Not me.

 

34 minutes ago, datacommando said:

I wonder how many people have bought a Keeley Dark Side Pedal after seeing the cool demo videos, then when they got home realised that it doesn't come pre-loaded with skill and talent to the level of a certain Mr David Gilmour.

 

You mean it doesn't?!!

 

34 minutes ago, datacommando said:

You can't really hurt a Helix (LT) they're real tough and if you screw up the presets a simple reload or reset works. It's not like the real world hardware were you could essential fry a stack of expensive equipment by plugging in the wrong thing. 

 

Remember -   Always work on a copy - play with it and have fun.

 

Coming from the Boss ME gear, I was a little surprised how easy it is to overwrite the factory presets. So, yes, once I'd reloaded the factory presets after updating the firmware to 2.82, I made a backup, and copied the ones I liked best to a new setlist.

 

I had to google how to restore factory presets, when I suspected that the firmware update hadn't actually done it. It turned out I was right, so it was a good thing I looked. Is it easy to restore the factory presets without wrecking any new custom presets, or is it a full backup and restore kinda process?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SaschaFranck said:

Regarding general "procedures", what I was (and still am, even regularly) doing is to just go through the amp models (ok, I'm doing it with other blocks as well, but these are most crucial), using a single general purpose IR (I have some I've shot and mixed myself, could easily share them in case there's interest) and then just check out what the amp models can do, completely regardless of what a) their original intentions and b) their default settings were.

 

I forgot to say that IRs are something I haven't even begun to look at. And, to be honest, I don't really understand them. They seem to be something to do with micing the cabs, but the cab models already seem to have parameters for that. I'll get to that, once I've mastered the 4,512 models.

 

BTW, when I unboxed the LT, I noticed a couple of IRs were loaded. But, after I updated the firmware to current, and reloaded the factory presets, the IRs were gone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, YammerUK said:

Actually, I noticed that many of the factory presets use the LA Studio compressor - after the amp/cab. I've been adding this (with default settings) to my custom presets because I like the way it gives the sound a professional polish.

 

+1

 

IMO... that compressor is magic. It is meant to replicate an LA-2A found in most studio's which is applied to a recorded track. That's why you find it near the end of the chain... it puts a shine on the finished part or as you say, "a professional polish". 

 

Another great option for this within the Helix is the "3 Band Comp". In the studio world this is "multi-band compression", where the lows/mids/highs are compressed with separate settings. This prevents the low end energy from squeezing the high end at the same time. 

 

I often tell people that are after a specific tone they heard and can't quite get there... not just those with a Helix, but with boards and amps as well. "The magic they are often missing is the studio compression"...it is a sound most are actually very familiar with, they just don't realize it. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just play around with it.   Best advice for tone search I've found, especially when it comes to modelling: "if it sounds good, it is good".  Explore the details, but don't get hung up on them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, YammerUK said:

I started playing electric guitar in the late 70s, and that was the way I've always done it: "Sustain" pedal first. When I built my first multi-effects unit, it went first. When I've subsequently bough multi-effects units, the compressor came at or near the start of the signal chain. I just assumed that was the way it's done.

 

In case you really want a boost (as in also boosting the gain/drive), quite obviously you're good to go with a compressor in front of the amp.

I sometimes place them between a drive pedal and the amp, though, so the drive pedal's drive remains as dynamic as it is with the compressor only smashing the amp a little bit.

 

Quote

Actually, I noticed that many of the factory presets use the LA Studio compressor - after the amp/cab. I've been adding this (with default settings) to my custom presets because I like the way it gives the sound a professional polish.

 

Quite a valid thing to do in case you're after that "polish". Not exactly a traditional boost, though.

I usually don't go for post-amp compression as I like to keep as much of the amp dynamics intact. But that's pretty much related to the fact that I'm mainly a live player, for such purposes it's often better to have pretty "raw" sounds. Back in my rack days I even had a dbx 160 post preamp, sounded great when playing alone - but uhm, the greatest sound improvement in a band context has been the moment when I actually switched it off.

 

Quote

As for legacy compressors — mind=blown. I hadn't even spotted those yet!

 

Yeah, you should check them out, apart from the Boost Comp, none of them has more than 2 parameters, which makes adjustements a breeze.

 

20 minutes ago, YammerUK said:

I forgot to say that IRs are something I haven't even begun to look at. And, to be honest, I don't really understand them. They seem to be something to do with micing the cabs, but the cab models already seem to have parameters for that. I'll get to that, once I've mastered the 4,512 models.

 

Well, IRs are basically used instead of the cab models (they represent a certain "fixed" cab/mic combination). Some people find them to be more useful than the onboard cab models, myself included - but I highly recommend to stick with the internal cabs as long as you're happy because there's no deeper rabbit hole than the IR one (there's literally gazillions of them around and each week there's a new kid on the block, possibly causing you to rebuild all your precious presets and what not...). Personally, I gotta say that I only manage to deal with IRs because I'm kinda with them ever since they became a viable option for recording purposes (like around 10-12 years ago), plus I also created my own IRs (another rabbit hole you don't want to get into) because that's exactly what's satisfying my nerdy obsessions. I'm pretty sure that I could/would get away fine with the internal cabs in case I wouldn't have that longtime experience with IRs already.

 

Anyway, I still recommend to check out amps without changing cabs - at least those within a certain tonal range. Fool around with the amp+cab blocks until there's something you like, have a look at the cab settings, then replace the amp+cab block with separate blocks for each. Sometimes (even rather often) just changing the cab will do a lot more than changing the amp (at least as long as the amps are somewhat comparable), so changing amps and cabs at once all the time might introduce too many parameters.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, YammerUK said:

Right. This is something I haven't looked into yet. Where do I go for 3rd party presets like these? Are there dedicated websites? If so, what do you recommend?

 

Well, name a song or five and we could possibly steer you to some.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, YammerUK said:

You mean it doesn't?!!


I’m still waiting for my free Nelson Mandela!
 

9 hours ago, YammerUK said:

I had to google how to restore factory presets

 

Here ya go - free cut out and keep.

 

Reset Options

 

Helix Floor/LT

Button Combination

Description

2

LED light Fun

3 & 4

Test Mode

5 & 6

Global reset

7 & 8

Reset setlists to factory, Keep IRs

8 & 9

Reset setlists to factory, Clear IRs

9 & 10

Reset setlists to factory, Global reset, Clear IRs

10 & 11

Upgrades existing presets to latest format

11 & 12

Clear current preset

5 & 12

Clear setlists, clear IRs, Return system settings to default

6 & 12

Safe boot mode

To use Reset Options:

  • Power off the Helix
  • Hold the desired button combination
  • Power on the Helix
  • Release the button combination

Please note: Buttons are numbered from top left to bottom right.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OP wrote: "..I wanted to build a preset including a compressor for soloing.." I know it was just an example and maybe because of the tonal characteristics, but it got me thinking about the  theme  'boosting for solos' and feeling happy as there are so many ways to do it!

 

My many years with multi-effects (my first was Zoom 9002 in 1990 and in my digital excitement I sold many legendary stomp boxes from the 70s, sigh.. It still works, though!) have thought me that there is no one recipe. And therefore it is also very difficult to give definitive answers. And that is actually the beauty of it!

Some times it so so great to have everything pre-programmed and have it happening with single step, some times it is so much fun to get back to the basics with just using guitar's volume and tone pots and mic selections. Occasionally I get the 'let's go back to real tube amps and analog pedals' fever, but after some fooling around with my collection I return to the digital world.  But enough babbling, here are some of my findings that I remind myself from time to time. In no particular order:

  • Try try & try! then try some more! The Great Jason Sadites demonstrates this in his videos when he goes like '..how would it sound if I just max this thing here? Or if I set it real slow? How about the next thing, if I max that..!' Well, he already knows what he is doing, but encourages you to try!
  • Before you notice have have learned quite a bit of what you like, what does what and how to get to your destination either the fast way or via the scenery route. It may sound silly, but while random moves sometimes provide real diamonds, systematic approaches increase your gems faster. Mostly this is 'just work', but what a fun work it is! Try things, break the rules, learn from others, read stories, watch videos..
  • Remember that you do not have the same limitations you have had with non-digital, non-programmable gear.
  • Learn how the human ear behaves - sensitivity to frequency ares & volume (Fletcher-Munson) etc. Fine tune tones and do volume matching and set your boosts at playing volume. Understand, that what sounds fine in headphones in low volume & alone may not make you heard in gig level volumes and when the whole band is playing.
  • That being said, you ears are yours and so is your taste, gear and playing touch. Preset from another will not sound the same for them and you. It may sound better or worse, but most likely not the same. Not even if they made with Variax and Helix and played through Powercab. You put in your Helix and play your Variax and through your Powercab - maybe close but no cicar, sometimes not even a cheap plastic imitation. An easy way to be reminded of this is to play the gear of the other guitarist in the same band and make him play your gear & presets and neither of you will sounds the other. If you do, well, that's worrying..
  • Avoid complexity - keep it clean and simple in the beginning and grow along the way - if and as needed. Keep asking 'why', particularly if you find yourself using several eq blocks making severe equalization, particularly manipulating  the same frequency ranges in many places, cutting somewhere in the chain and boosting them back elsewhere.
  • Learn to understand and control your gain structures - I know it is a matter of taste and depends your style of playing an music style. Personally, I often find that people easily use 'too much' gain and stack gain again and a-gain (pun intended). At the same time, do realize that sometimes that's the way to achieve what you are after.
  • For the most of your patches try to be consistent in how you build them. Helps a lot in maintaining , changing and using them as copy-templates for  both generic and song specific use. Otherwise it is very easy to get lost and forget which button / expression pedal did in which preset.
  • Speaking of consistency, learn the concept of unity gain. I tend to do my patch templates with each block being at unity gain to avoid clipping and to be consistent. Then, after that, deliberately set your boost using a selected means. Guitar's volume control, compressor at beginning, drive pedal level, amp channel volume, eq in the chain, volume pedal in the chain, output block at the end of the chain - depends on the application. If you are only looking for a 'clean' boost, then you could use  +3-6db boost at the end part of the chain. If you not only want to boost but change the characteristics of the tone then it might be better to do it  in the chain before the amp. Control assigns and snapshots are very very powerful - it is so easy to set you lead tone - with the boost!
  • Do not use the global EQ as your tone shaping tool, look for other tools instead and things per patch/preset. Especially so if you tailor some of your presets to acoustic / bass / kb or use parallel paths for other inputs, be it microphones or whatever.
  • Be versatile and use several tones intentionally. If the music you play permits and why would it not? You are in charge of the experience. Personally, I get uncomfortable numb for bands playing the whole gig with just one sound and no dynamics in volume. Weave sound-mat together, do not just race to make noise and fill the spectrum.
  • Tweak, but remember to play.

Let your mileage differ. .Otherwise we would only be and have copies and that would be boring.

 

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, datacommando said:

Reset Options

 

Helix Floor/LT

Button Combination

Description

2

LED light Fun

3 & 4

Test Mode

5 & 6

Global reset

7 & 8

Reset setlists to factory, Keep IRs

8 & 9

Reset setlists to factory, Clear IRs

9 & 10

Reset setlists to factory, Global reset, Clear IRs

10 & 11

Upgrades existing presets to latest format

11 & 12

Clear current preset

5 & 12

Clear setlists, clear IRs, Return system settings to default

6 & 12

Safe boot mode

To use Reset Options:

  • Power off the Helix
  • Hold the desired button combination
  • Power on the Helix
  • Release the button combination

Please note: Buttons are numbered from top left to bottom right.

 

That looks like what my googling found. I never tried the "LED light fun". Maybe I should.

 

Q1. Is the Helix supposed to come with IRs pre-installed? Mine had 2 out of the box, but these disappeared after I reloaded the factory presets.

Q2. Does "reset setlists to factory" wipe any/all non-factory presets?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A1. No - there are no IRS pre-installed. The fact that you had some means your Helix is not brand new; someone used it to install those IRS. The factory reset properly removed them.

 

A2. Yes, as well as removing all IRS and restoring all Global Settings to their default values.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Correction: A2 above is not always the case. As you see in your previous post there are options about IRS and Global Settings when you choose to reset the setlists to factory.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, YammerUK said:

That looks like what my googling found. I never tried the "LED light fun". Maybe I should.

 

Q1. Is the Helix supposed to come with IRs pre-installed? Mine had 2 out of the box, but these disappeared after I reloaded the factory presets.

Q2. Does "reset setlists to factory" wipe any/all non-factory presets?

 

Hi Keith,

 

LED fun is a lovely for about, oh... 3 seconds it's just one of those things that programmers do - because they can.

 

Anyhow, as noted by "silverhead" in the posts above, someone must have had your LT out of the box and loaded those IRs because they don't get shipped like that normally. I would be asking questions of the vendor. When I bought mine from Dawsons, way back in November 2015, they were in short supply in the UK, so they explained that it was an "opened box" but never used. Seem the guy bought it and when he got back home his wife was not best pleased. Oops!

 

Also, as you should be able to tell from the list of Reset Options (above), in most cases IRs are cleared (wiped) during reset, but holding FS 7&8 will keep them while doing a Factory Reset.

 

One other thing to note is, when you load a preset that you have downloaded from CustomTone when you next restart your LT it may go in to the routine of displaying "Rebuilding Presets" on the screen. This is normal, especially if you have loaded an older preset that hasn't been previous optimised to the current firmware of your unit.

 

Even though the sun may be shining in Manchester - stay inside and mess with your toy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/13/2020 at 8:10 PM, YammerUK said:

I wanted to build a preset including a compressor for soloing. I think I counted 5 compressors. They all work differently. Some of them seem to work better after the amp/cab model, and some before. Some of the control descriptions are a bit vague, and some are highly technical. Some of the controls don't seem to do anything, and some models don't seem to work well in any settings.

 

For the benefit of anyone coming here with a similar question, I found this video, which goes on a bit, but covers the Helix compressors in depth.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...