Jump to content
Bahnzo

Quick question about going direct into amp

Recommended Posts

I want to take my Pod Go to a local jam where I'll be using someone else's amp. I don't have an amp at home to practice or test this on, which is why I'm asking here.

 

I only want/need to use maybe a couple different overdrives and the wah/volume. So please tell me if I have this correct for this sort of setup:

 

In the Pod Go, I'll turn off all the amp and cab blocks and just setup the overdrive and distortion I want. Then: guitar into the Pod Go, and which output do I want to use to the front of the amp? Do I want to use the Main Out/mono or the Amp Out?

 

Also, any tips or things I might want to know about setting up this way? I want to make this as quick as possible to setup. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you only will use distortion or overdrive, then use main out left to front of your amp. But if you want to use time effects and depending which amp you use (if it have loop effect), you would must to hook it up to the pod go by 4CM. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keep it simple. If the borrowed amp has an fx loop, I'd just go into the FX return to use it as a power amp, and let Pod Go and your normal settings do the work. 

 

Otherwise, go through the front, keep the amp clean and your normal patches will still likely be OK.

 

But in case, set up a basic fx only patch with what you need, e.g. a distortion, reverb, light delay, and modulation e.g. phaser or chorus, and I'd set the EQ as a lead boost at the end of the chain. That way you have a simple stomp arrangement to control your tone as you need it.

 

In my view 4 cable is a pain and I honestly don't recommend it. It's hard enough to get everything balanced with your own amp, let alone with a strange rig. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, voxman55 said:

Keep it simple. If the borrowed amp has an fx loop, I'd just go into the FX return to use it as a power amp, and let Pod Go and your normal settings do the work. 

 

Otherwise, go through the front, keep the amp clean and your normal patches will still likely be OK.

 

But in case, set up a basic fx only patch with what you need, e.g. a distortion, reverb, light delay, and modulation e.g. phaser or chorus, and I'd set the EQ as a lead boost at the end of the chain. That way you have a simple stomp arrangement to control your tone as you need it.

 

In my view 4 cable is a pain and I honestly don't recommend it. It's hard enough to get everything balanced with your own amp, let alone with a strange rig. 

 

Ok, some interesting choices I didn't consider.

 

For just going to the FX return on the amp, what output would I use from the Pod Go? The Mono main out? I've read a bunch of stuff about the amp and speaker coloring the sound too much when using the Pod Go's own amp/cab models in conjunction with the physical amp and speaker, so that would worry me a bit in this situation where I need to be plugged in and ready to go ASAP. 

 

I'm probably playing though an older Fender(and I wouldn't be 100% that it even has an FX loop), so I really just wanted to add the Klon to color my sound a little and maybe the Tube Screamer if I needed a more distorted lead. The EQ for lead boost is a good idea tho, I'll certainly give that a try. Thanks. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good question. Line 6 makes this needlessly complicated.

 

By default, the AMP OUT jack is after the speaker sim block. You can change this globally (all presets) in the settings so that AMP OUT is after the amp, but before the cab sim block. This doesn't make sense because a physical amp will have preamp, amp, and speakers. But, that's the way Line 6 engineers decided it should be.

 

You have multiple solutions:

 

1. Far and away the best is 4 cable method, but that requires an amp with effects send/receive.

 

2. Leave the AMP OUT tap spot at default (after speaker) and turn off the amp and speaker sim blocks. If you do this and connect at AMP out, your signal will go through all of the blocks preceding the speaker block, but will not go through any blocks after the speaker sim block. Or, connect to main out and have all the effects in the chain present.

 

3. Change AMP out tap spot to be post AMP block and disable the amp sim block. Your signal will go through all effects preceding the amp block, but none after the amp block. Or, connect to main and have all blocks in signal path.

 

4. Sneaky way: buy a MFM Y 1/4" cable. Jump the go's effects out to effects in using the two male connectors. Use the female on the Y cable to connect to the input of the guitar amp. Put the go's effects send/receive block anywhere in the chain you want (most likely before the amp block). Turn effects send/receive on and remove stomp switch so that you can't accidently turn it off.  This way you get two signals: one with no amp/speaker sim to send to the amp, and another signal WITH amp/speaker simulation to send to a FOH mixer or recording system.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, poodad said:

Good question. Line 6 makes this needlessly complicated.

 

By default, the AMP OUT jack is after the speaker sim block. You can change this globally (all presets) in the settings so that AMP OUT is after the amp, but before the cab sim block. This doesn't make sense because a physical amp will have preamp, amp, and speakers. But, that's the way Line 6 engineers decided it should be.

 

You have multiple solutions:

 

1. Far and away the best is 4 cable method, but that requires an amp with effects send/receive.

 

 

I don't necessarily agree with that statement as an 'absolute'.  It can give good results but it very much depends on what you want to achieve.  It also depends on what FX you use and the type of FX loop. A serial FX loop will usually give better results than eg a parallel loop that might only give you a 70-80% maximum 'mix'.  If you connect a MFX unit into the FX return, you are bypassing the amps input stage and purely using the amp as a 'power amp' which makes using your MFX and set-up much simpler.  It's often just a case of experimentation to figure out what option sounds best for you.  Of course, if you want to use your amps natural distortion then 4-cable is the way to go. The biggest downside of 4-cable is that it's more awkward and 'messier' to set-up, not just needing more cables but also setting up your pedal board or MFX unit in a way that gives you the results you want.

 

There's some good articles here on 4 cable, inc set up details:

 

https://guitargearfinder.com/guides/use-four-cable-method/

https://rolandcorp.com.au/blog/4-cable-method-4cm

https://blog.andertons.co.uk/learn/what-is-4-cabl

 

There's a good video here too, with a line 6 Helix:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...