Jump to content

Jtv-69 Neck Finish - Glossy Vs Matte


Recommended Posts

Hello.  I have an older JTV-69 that I bought used (not sure year, but probably when they first came out), and the neck finish is on the glossy side (maybe more like semi-gloss).  From playing a new model JTV-69, I noticed that the neck finish is very matte, almost feeling like bare wood.  I much prefer the feel of the older neck with the glossy finish.

 

Does any one know when Line 6 switched finishes? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello.  I have an older JTV-69 that I bought used (not sure year, but probably when they first came out), and the neck finish is on the glossy side (maybe more like semi-gloss).  From playing a new model JTV-69, I noticed that the neck finish is very matte, almost feeling like bare wood.  I much prefer the feel of the older neck with the glossy finish.

 

Does any one know when Line 6 switched finishes? 

 

Can't say for sure, but they may not have changed anything. That satin finish doesn't last long. Oils and perspiration from your hands will literally polish it for you over time. Every guitar I've had with a satin finish neck [as opposed to a heavy, polished laquer] has been like that. Had mine little more than 2 months, and even in that short time, just from daily use the neck now looks and feels much different than it did out of the box...more of the "glossy" feel that you describe. Difference can easily be seen comparing the neck to the back of the headstock, which isn't getting handled at all. Don't even have to touch it...it's easily visible. So if the used one you bought was played a lot, it doesn't surprise me that it feels different from a newer guitar.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

make sure you do not get any of the steel wool inside the guitar. I'm sure it can short circuit it if you do.

 

I suppose it could...if wou wedged an entire pad of the stuff in next to your switches and pots, but I don't think the little shavings pose much of a risk. I've been using ultra fine steel wool to get crud off of fretboards and to smooth the backs of necks for years, and never gave it a second thought....unless you have the pickguard or backplates off at the same time, it's nearly impossible to screw anything up. And even then you're using it on the neck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

typical guitars wouldnt like be too bothered... but the variax has a circuitboard etc that could easily end badly...

 

I suppose it could...if wou wedged an entire pad of the stuff in next to your switches and pots, but I don't think the little shavings pose much of a risk. I've been using ultra fine steel wool to get crud off of fretboards and to smooth the backs of necks for years, and never gave it a second thought....unless you have the pickguard or backplates off at the same time, it's nearly impossible to screw anything up. And even then you're using it on the neck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

make sure you do not get any of the steel wool inside the guitar. I'm sure it can short circuit it if you do.

 

I suppose it could...if wou wedged an entire pad of the stuff in next to your switches and pots, but I don't think the little shavings pose much of a risk. I've been using ultra fine steel wool to get crud off of fretboards and to smooth the backs of necks for years, and never gave it a second thought....unless you have the pickguard or backplates off at the same time, it's nearly impossible to screw anything up. And even then you're using it on the neck.

the point is moot because i read the post as if he wanted a smooth matte finish, instead of glossy. like i said, i need to start wearing glasses when i read this forum

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You short circuit a regular guitar it'll just start buzzing or not making sound most likely.

 

You short circuit a computer system and you can possibly fry or damage components that are getting voltages that they're not supposed to. This can result in it not working properly or not working at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You short circuit a regular guitar it'll just start buzzing or not making sound most likely.

 

You short circuit a computer system and you can possibly fry or damage components that are getting voltages that they're not supposed to. This can result in it not working properly or not working at all.

I don't think anyone is arguing that short circuits are a good thing, and I'm sure its possible to produce them by shoving metal stuff inside the guts of a Variax. However, I maintain that unless one is truly spastic, an incredible slob, or deliberately trying to ruin the guitar, using a little steel wool on the neck with no exposed electrical components poses near zero risk to the guitar. If not, then perhaps mine will fry one day...but I seriously doubt it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you're surely correct... but "near zero" is not the same as "zero"

it's just always good to be aware, that's all.

 

I don't think anyone is arguing that short circuits are a good thing, and I'm sure its possible to produce them by shoving metal stuff inside the guts of a Variax. However, I maintain that unless one is truly spastic, an incredible slob, or deliberately trying to ruin the guitar, using a little steel wool on the neck with no exposed electrical components poses near zero risk to the guitar. If not, then perhaps mine will fry one day...but I seriously doubt it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...