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Equal Levelling Among Patches?


mirflee
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no... because tone perception changes as the volume changes...

here's how you get them level (kind of, keep in mind its not thye db's that are level just the perception of db's)

set the master at a comfortable level...

then adjust the tone to desired channel volume/drive/etc, and save....

once you've gone through and done this, then the volumes will all go up and down with the master volume, rather than tone by tone.

probably what you were doing anyway... but that's how its done...

basically do not touch the master... adjust and save.

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Still new at this.

I tried using a db meter in my phone, but it wasn't as helpful as just using my ears.

Since cleans will cut through in a band situations better than distortions, it's a matter of doing what someone said in another post: Do the best you can in your living room, tweak during practices or gigs, and make mental notes of what you need to do when you get back home later.

The more I do it the easier it gets.

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what Joe said, thou any solution is a bit time consuming arguous when they could set they levels equal from the factory. Clearly research this is what most users would like, v.s. the 'real' output of modeled amps. Hassle.

Perhaps best described as set up better for recording than live,eh?

Oh, I see why you might want it the way it comes, as it's true to the amps modeled, but redundant a bit when most the floorboards have a volume pedal you could employ for this or edit the models 'like real' for those few who'd want that, rather than make the majority of us have to edit to 'even'.

This would impress customers in the store best too. Model outputs even.

Most prospective buyers have never owned all these amps anyway, and many have never owned a tube amp at all

They have no comparative expectation here, and therefor hits their ears as a "whaaa?" moment

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often times the volume\level of the tone is part of the equation of what the user is intending to go for....

if they leveled them all for rock tones, then the blues guys would complain etc...

so they did it IMO the smart way... did the best for the preset and what they had intended when making it...

and let the users do what they will from there....

besides... the preset are nice to dive right in...

but anyone that is REALLY going to use these things anywhere near their potential will outgrow the presets in no time flat....

i also believe that anyone, even taking a more pedestrian approach... would go to custom tone and download tones with levels all over the place...

so... i don't see an automatic limit doing anyone any good other than to essentially limit the total volume/headroom of the device as a whole.

 

 

what Joe said, thou any solution is a bit time consuming arguous when they could set they levels equal from the factory. Clearly research this is what most users would like, v.s. the 'real' output of modeled amps. Hassle.

Perhaps best described as set up better for recording than live,eh?

Oh, I see why you might want it the way it comes, as it's true to the amps modeled, but redundant a bit when most the floorboards have a volume pedal you could employ for this or edit the models 'like real' for those few who'd want that, rather than make the majority of us have to edit to 'even'.

This would impress customers in the store best too. Model outputs even.

Most prospective buyers have never owned all these amps anyway, and many have never owned a tube amp at all

They have no comparative expectation here, and therefor hits their ears as a "whaaa?" moment

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Jes say'n it might make better marketing sence  to newbs  Anyone having owned some of these modeled amps would more likely appreciate your point but L6 sell more product to relative begnners and techno-hip young'ns that the set in there ways analog/tube purist crowd tending to be either older or more experienced.

L6 musta sold a million spyder amps, but hardly a one to a seasoned 'vet'.

And, I did a lotta reseach before my purchase and this topic was the #1 complaint, sooo.. :P

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Sure enough, there are a lot of volume variable.

If you allow gain and Amp volume to be part of your tone, then the master edit page1 of the amp parameters needs to be 100% and master output volume set at 75-100% or thereabouts from patch to patch. 

Using the mixer on the amp block you can start getting some consistency.

It is true from clean to distortion has to sound right and not equal in volume, so too when an FX is added you don't want the same volume, just a tad more for some and a little more for others.

An SPL meter is not so much needed for this but handy as a reference for one or two main patches amp only patches and full amp and FX. the rest is by ear. 

All FX on and then to a new patch with none or one FX is the tricky part and here the volume controller to foot switch gymnastics can smooth the transition.

Good point about the tonality. True the ear is sensitive to that rasping 2k 

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I had huge problems with this, playing in a cover band where I was using totally different patches in every song and covered a fairly wide variety of styles. Really the only way is to keep tweaking your volume during practice and making sure everyone else in the band is playing at a consistent volume (do NOT let your bassist mess with the mixing board while you're playing!!! cannot emphasize this enough). I tried putting every patch through a peak meter on my computer and working off that, turned out to be a big failure for aforementioned reasons (differential cutting through etc.). I can't really whine about this because this is the caveat of having the amazing capability to emulate so many different guitar sounds using one machine. It just takes a LOT of dedication to achieve a good result.

 

In the future, I've decided to just come up with a basic set of 5-6 tones and build a go-to effects toolbox so that I can just switch into one of those 6 tones and do the rest in stompbox mode. I guess there's a reason so many professionals just work off a single amp but have a forest of stomboxes at their feet.

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