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danshibz

Guitar and Vocals live through POD HD500x

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Okay, so I've been using the pod for guitar effects for some time now. I use it for all modulation, delay, verb and then go straight into my head. I don't use models live.

Because of this, I have plenty of DSP left (especially on the 500x) and I want to put it to use by adding effects to my vocals.

 

The inputs are very straight forward, and I understand the internal signal routing aspect totally, so I know how to keep these two signals separate.

 

Problem is, I need an unbalanced output to go to the amp and a balanced out to go to FOH for the vocals. The unbalanced outputs automatically sum to mono so I can't use one of each without sending vocals to my amp!

 

I could use both unbalanced outs and use a DI for the vocals (seems like a TOTAL waste of a good DI and I'd rather use it elsewhere) OR I use both balanced and "unbalance" the signal going to the amp.

I'm pretty handy with a soldering iron so I can make the cable, but I need to know whether to short the cold pin to ground or leave it open. I definitely don't want to fry anything.


Can someone help me figure this out?

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How about plugging in a mono 1/4" jack into unbalanced right output (going no where) and another mono 1/4" into the left going to your amp? Wouldn't that keep the left & right separate so you can still use the stereo XLR outputs?

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How about plugging in a mono 1/4" jack into unbalanced right output (going no where) and another mono 1/4" into the left going to your amp? Wouldn't that keep the left & right separate so you can still use the stereo XLR outputs?

+1 to pfsmith0.  Exactly right... or switch to just the right 1/4 out.  Only the left sums to mono...

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+1 to pfsmith0.  Exactly right... or switch to just the right 1/4 out.  Only the left sums to mono...

 Hi radatats - on my HD500 the 1/4 out jacks are labelled L/MONO and R/MONO.  I thought that this meant that if you use just the L or just the R out that it gets summed to mono, but if you use both then you get just the L or just the R from each one.    I have not double checked to see if that is true and wondered whether you had actually double checked and found that in reality only the L out will sum to mono.   I read my HD500 pilots guide and it does not clarify what happens when you only use one of the 1/4 outs.  Thanks.

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Wow, interesting.  I have always heard it was only the left that sums but I don't see anything in the manuals.

 

I am not at home this week so I can't test it.  Maybe you can confirm?

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Wow, interesting.  I have always heard it was only the left that sums but I don't see anything in the manuals.

 

I am not at home this week so I can't test it.  Maybe you can confirm?

I tested it out, and I can confirm that you can use either L or R to get a summed MONO mix.  If you use both then you get a stereo mix with just L and just R out of each respective output.

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I tested it out, and I can confirm that you can use either L or R to get a summed MONO mix.  If you use both then you get a stereo mix with just L and just R out of each respective output.

 

thanks, I learned something today!  so if you want that mono signal, use a dummy jack on the other side...

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So just plugging a jack to nowhere will keep the summing from happening, but still allow me to take a right signal (lets say) from the unbalanced ts out and a left signal from the balanced xlr out? That would be ideal, since I wont have to worry about high/low impedance issues.

Plugging a jack with no connection on the other side still leaves the circuit open though. Would I need to plug in a jack that shorts the live signal to ground? (connect the tip to the sleeve connections on the inside of the jack with a copper wire jumper)

I guess I'll just try plugging a cable in and see what happens, I don't want to short the audio signal to ground if I don't have to. Plus, I know doing that wouldn't harm an analog circuit, but I know squat about digital and like I said I'd hate to fry something!

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So just plugging a jack to nowhere will keep the summing from happening, but still allow me to take a right signal (lets say) from the unbalanced ts out and a left signal from the balanced xlr out? That would be ideal, since I wont have to worry about high/low impedance issues.

 

Plugging a jack with no connection on the other side still leaves the circuit open though. Would I need to plug in a jack that shorts the live signal to ground? (connect the tip to the sleeve connections on the inside of the jack with a copper wire jumper)

 

I guess I'll just try plugging a cable in and see what happens, I don't want to short the audio signal to ground if I don't have to. Plus, I know doing that wouldn't harm an analog circuit, but I know squat about digital and like I said I'd hate to fry something!

you don't need a special plug.  just plug a spare guitar cable in going to nothing. that prevents the 1/4's from summing to mono.

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I thought the summing happened based on the last pedal in the block chain. If it's a mono pedal, both R & L would be the summed signal, if it's a stereo pedal, then R & L would be the appropriate channel. Is that not correct?

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I thought the summing happened based on the last pedal in the block chain. If it's a mono pedal, both R & L would be the summed signal, if it's a stereo pedal, then R & L would be the appropriate channel. Is that not correct?

 

that is also correct.  If you place a mono effect last in your chain the signal going to both the left and right outputs, XLR and 1/4, will be identical and mono.  If you have a stereo effect last then separate left and right signals will go to the outputs.  Additionally, the 1//4 outs will sum to mono if you only use one of them.  If you use both they will maintain their stereo signals.  The XLR's do not have that capability and always carry separate left and right signals.

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A plug is male and a jack is female? Even though jack is a male name?

The male is called "Jack plug", the female "Jack socket".

"Jack" is the type of connector, "plug and socket" the gender.

And that's it.

 

As far as Jack Daniel's, you'd rather plug it in the guitar-layer's mouth tahn in the guitar socket (you would get no sound!!). :P

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