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TenShiCover

POD UX2 = Poor sound

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google translation: 

 

hello I just ask you to help me because I'm so desperate before exposure My problem is my config 

 

LTD M100 FM / POD UX 2 (black frontage) / home theater 

 

So my worry is that I have a completely rotten sound worthy of a guitar at 50 € 

 

small snippet of sound I get (whether with POD farm / guitar rig / fl studio ...) 

 


 

do you have a solution?

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http://hebergeurfichier.com/download/62b538c1c64d83a4f3f56e6f458ea1d8.html (I just add distortion to show you the sound I no noise or anything at all for you to better understand the problem the noise gate etoufe the buz but still present ) 

 

yes but the sound is clear and clean and no me neither it unusable and full of parasite why? 
 
I do not ask to have a great sound but something decent to just be able to learn

(Here is why I'm looking for me my sound is bad)

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Pretty cool Ten!

 

I think you need to explore the EQ controls if you want to reduce the fizz/buzz.

 

Because it sounds like you are using alot of gain buzz/fizz will be there. Speakers can be a factor too.

 

Take a look here:

 

http://foobazaar.com/podhd/toneGuide/eq

 

Reduce 1400 - 1600 MHZ as a start.

 

\m/ Bill \m/

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"Reduce 1400 - 1600 MHz as a start." I find his or? and the buzz is still present even with the helmet and even I use presets already programmed

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I'm back :)

 

Connect your UX2 and open up Pod Farm and you will be able to adjust the EQ in there for the tone you are working with. The amp models also have EQ controls. Play around with them as EQ can really make the sound happen. Like if you record with your group and find the bass player is drowning you out - you probably have too little mid range (classic V scoop). While the drums' cymbals are using the high range.

 

You still might want to reduce the gain some.

 

-B

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then I understand is that you said to me except that it can not ^^ but the sound is really bad I can not play rock or metal or anything the only clean drinking I'm still adjust each knob or test each effect preset other person I gets no good result it's actually a little late home (France) tomorrow I'll post video picture is for you to understand my problem in more detail thank you anyway for helping me change it myself the french telling me all burn ^^

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Cool - Votre anglais est meilleur que mon français

 

Réduire le gain et utiliser un égaliseur paramétrique à réduire les fréquences supérieures . Jouez avec les différents hz et ajouter un compresseur à . -Par google translate btw :)

 

faire une recherche pour - Glenn Delaune eq trick for the x3  il devrait vous aider dans votre quête de métal

 

-B

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Ce fut à partir d'un ancien article sur votre question . Utilisation de poste et eq avant de réduire les fréquences qui sont à l'origine du sifflement = This was from an old article on your issue. Using post and pre eq to reduce the frequencies which are causing the fizz.

 

I really don't record that much but use the EQs to dial out excess of highs and lows. = Je n'enregistre vraiment pas beaucoup , mais j'utilise les égaliseurs pour composer plus de hauts et de bas .

 

I am sure there others here who can probably explain it better than I can. = Je suis sûr qu'il y d'autres ici qui peut sans doute expliquer mieux que je peux. :)

 

Gardez à elle !

Bill

 

 

How to Make Amp Sims Sound More “Analogâ€

VERSION 11 transparent.png
Created on: Aug 27, 2010 3:36 PM byAnderton-Last Modified: Dec 10, 2010 6:38 PM by Anderton
{C}
This Simple Technique Can Make Amp Sims Sound Warmer and More Organic

 

by Craig Anderton

 

All amp sims that I've used exhibit, to one degree or another, what I call "the annoying frequency." For some reason this seems to be inherent in modeling, and adds a sort of "fizzy," whistling sound that I find objectionable. It may be the result of pickup characteristics, musical style, playing technique, etc. adding up in the wrong way and therefore emphasizing a resonance or it may be something else...but in any event, it detracts from the potential richness of the amp sound.

 

This article includes audio examples from Avid’s Eleven Rack and Native Instruments’ Guitar Rig 4, but I’m not picking on them – almost every amp sim program I’ve used has at least one or two amps that exhibit this characteristic. It also seems like an unpredictable problem; one amp might have this “fizz†only when using a particular virtual mic or cabinet, but the same mic or cabinet on a different amp might sound fine.

 

Normally, if you found this sound, you'd probably just say "I don't like that" and try a different cabinet, amp, or mic (or change the amp settings). But, you don't have to if you know the secret of fizz removal. All you need is a stage or two of parametric (not quasi-parametric) EQ, a good set of ears, and a little patience.

 

BUT FIRST...

Before getting into fizz removal, you might try a couple other techniques. Physical amps don’t have a lot of energy above 5kHz because of the physics of cabinets and speakers, but amp sims don’t have physical limitations. So eEven if the sim is designed to reduce highs, you’ll often find high-frequency artifacts, particularly if you run the sim at lower sample rates (e.g., 44.1kHz). One way to obtain a more pleasing distorted amp sim sound is simply to run the sim at an 88.2kHz or 96kHz sample rate.

 

Another option is removing unneeded high frequencies. Many EQs offer a lowpass filter response that attenuates levels above a certain frequency. Set this for around 5-10kHz, with as steep a rolloff as possible (specified in dB/octave; 12dB/octave is good, 24dB/octave is better). Vary the frequency until any high-frequency “buzziness†goes away.

 

Similarly, it’s a good idea to trim the very lowest bass frequencies. Physical cabinets—particularly open-back cabinets—have a limited low frequency response; besides, recording engineers often roll off the bass a bit to give a “tighter†sound. A quality parametric EQ will probably have a highpass filter function. As a guitar’s lowest string is just below 100Hz, set the frequency for a sharp low-frequency rolloff around 70Hz or so to minimize any “mud.â€

 

There is more but you get the idea.

 

Harmony Central had the full version but the link is a 404 :(

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I understand that I have to use an EQ but I do not understand why those with the same adjustment that a person youtube or original presets I obient that were horrible and last question you talk about gold kHz I do not see or that is?

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Tones will almost always sound different between people. Your hands are different from theirs, your equipment is different (pickups, strings, etc...) so any setting is really just a starting point.

 

I was telling how I get rid of the ''fizz/fuzz'' but you are going to have to sit down and build the patches then edit the recordings in your DAW.

 

The UX2 stock presets are not that good just use them as a starting point. You can download user patches from Customtone and adjust them. It would probably help to see how the patches are built.

 

-B

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the good I have tested everything without any result but really every setting possible impossible to get good sound in the video as always no matter the setting, so I followed your advice

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I tried out a few setting in PodFarm 2 prior to another crash (this computer is dying btw).

 

Gate on->Compressor (dial in enough to squash volume dynamics and bump sustain)->paraEQ (two downward spikes at the low and high end - gentle bump in the mid)-> tube screamer (gain ¬ 25%, drive ¬ 40%, tone ¬ 2pm)-> digital delay (¬224 ms on time, pretty low in the mix)-> soldano100 (gain ¬ 70, tone - sart all pointed up)-> 4x12 with gt75 (on axis mic - default choice I think) -> para EQ (two spikes pointed up to bost lows and highs back - moderate mids)->reverb (not really needed - low in the mix if used)->out.

 

I used an ESP F-200/emgs so it is bass heavy and gives a good chunk with palm muting. Love ESPs btw. :)

 

It sounded ok in Audicity for a quick hack job but there is alot of other things going on in those vids to me (cab impulses, DAW magic, double tracking, etc.). I am not qualified to help much for DAWs as I don't use them much except for rough tracks for band ideas.

 

PodFarm is good but with more knowledge of whatever DAW you are using you can take it further. I usually run an X3 or XT into Audacity or Reaper (if I need more drum options).

 

Hope this helps,

Bill

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