Jump to content


Photo

Middle Ground On Rf1 Vs Rf2 Mode


Best Answer dboomer , 26 September 2013 - 09:54 AM

Yes I guess this qualifies as a dilemma.  There are only so many cars you can drive down the freeway at the same time.you may think you  are operating in fairly calm environments, but there really aren't many left.  And of course it's invisable so you can't see it.

 

So RF1 was developed specifically to operate in heavy RF environments filled with Wi-Fi and we almost always win with no problem.  But when you run in RF2 mode you are pretty much just another wi-fi device frequency-wise and have to find clear channels ... just like the wi-fi does.  Wi-fi is it's own built-in problem as it interferes with itself and everyone in your audience with a smartphone is touching the wi-fi used to control mixers.

 

The solution for the sound guys would be to switch over to 802.11N at 5G and shut off their 2.4G.  This is likely already builtin to their routers but they just dont know about it.  That was the audiences cell phones wont hit them either and their network will run twice as fast.

 

So back to your problem ...  You can operate in RF2 mode when you can find enough open space or switch over to RF1 mode.  Now if you know what channel they are operating on you can pick RF1 channels that shouldn't bother them much as long as you are only operating a couple of Line 6 devices. They are probably operating on 1,6, or 11 as these are the only non overlapping wi-fi channels (in the US)

 

ccs-1582879-0-04839800-1376004724.png

You could also use paddles and focus your pickup area, then switch your transmitters to low power in RF1 mode.

Go to the full post


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 mprimus

mprimus

    Just Startin'

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 26 September 2013 - 07:40 AM

So here's the dilemma.  My lead singer/rhythm guitar player and I are running into some pretty severe interference problems.  I use a G90 (upgraded to latest firmware to support RF2 mode) for my bass, he uses a G55 for guitar and XDV75/Crown CM11 for vocals.  I started using the G90 (upgraded from G50) a couple years back and loved using the unit (RF1 mode).  Now that we're using RF2 mode, we're finding the RF2 mode nearly unusable in any kind of civilized area due to high interference.  When doing channel scans, every channel is showing some interference, and the least interfered channels are still resulting in 2-3 bars of red/RF interference, and subsequently we have a range of about 15 feet with our units if we're lucky.  The obvious choice would be to move everything over to RF1 mode, but more and more we're using sound guys with Presonus or Mackie mixers that choose to mix wirelessly via WiFi/tablet.   RF1 blows their network connection up to where they can't do their job. 

 

Just wondering if we tack on the the P180 or P360's might be a solution, rather than just switching over to RF1 and telling the sound guys "tough" on using their wireless capability to mix.  Love our units, just not the wireless range/interference issues.  I thought we were in fairly calm RF environments, but that doesn't seem to be the case. 

 

 


  • 0

#2 dboomer

dboomer

    Line 6 Staff

  • Moderator
  • 2687 posts

Posted 26 September 2013 - 09:54 AM   Best Answer

Yes I guess this qualifies as a dilemma.  There are only so many cars you can drive down the freeway at the same time.you may think you  are operating in fairly calm environments, but there really aren't many left.  And of course it's invisable so you can't see it.

 

So RF1 was developed specifically to operate in heavy RF environments filled with Wi-Fi and we almost always win with no problem.  But when you run in RF2 mode you are pretty much just another wi-fi device frequency-wise and have to find clear channels ... just like the wi-fi does.  Wi-fi is it's own built-in problem as it interferes with itself and everyone in your audience with a smartphone is touching the wi-fi used to control mixers.

 

The solution for the sound guys would be to switch over to 802.11N at 5G and shut off their 2.4G.  This is likely already builtin to their routers but they just dont know about it.  That was the audiences cell phones wont hit them either and their network will run twice as fast.

 

So back to your problem ...  You can operate in RF2 mode when you can find enough open space or switch over to RF1 mode.  Now if you know what channel they are operating on you can pick RF1 channels that shouldn't bother them much as long as you are only operating a couple of Line 6 devices. They are probably operating on 1,6, or 11 as these are the only non overlapping wi-fi channels (in the US)

 

ccs-1582879-0-04839800-1376004724.png

You could also use paddles and focus your pickup area, then switch your transmitters to low power in RF1 mode.



#3 mprimus

mprimus

    Just Startin'

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 26 September 2013 - 10:49 AM

Thanks Don.


  • 0

#4 Digital-sound

Digital-sound

    Iknowathingortwo

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 378 posts

Posted 05 October 2013 - 05:41 AM

Don, does your table indicate which line 6 channel to use, or not to use base don't the WiFi column?
  • 0

#5 dboomer

dboomer

    Line 6 Staff

  • Moderator
  • 2687 posts

Posted 05 October 2013 - 07:09 AM

The table shows which Line 6 RF1 channels will have the minimum interaction when the listed wi-fi channel is in use. So the chart lists L6 channels 1 & 12 will least interfere with wi-fi channel 1. How well this works depends on the relative distances between units and the quality of the wi-fi's receiver to reject out of band signals.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users